Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Sponge: Set up Cornell Notes on pg. 29 Topic: 11.6 The Diencephalon and Brainstem Essential Question: On the picture provided, please describe the major.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Sponge: Set up Cornell Notes on pg. 29 Topic: 11.6 The Diencephalon and Brainstem Essential Question: On the picture provided, please describe the major."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sponge: Set up Cornell Notes on pg. 29 Topic: 11.6 The Diencephalon and Brainstem Essential Question: On the picture provided, please describe the major functions of the parts of the inner brain Thalamus Hypothalamus Midbrain Pons Medulla Oblongata 2.1 Atoms, Ions, and Molecules 11.6 The Diencephalon and Brainstem NOTEBOOKS DUE WEDNESDAY!!!! 415 pts Brain Labeling Quiz on WEDNESDAY too.

2 2 Diencephalon located between cerebral hemispheres and above the brainstem

3 3 Diencephalon Thalamus Hypothalamus

4 4 Diencephalon Thalamus gateway for sensory impulses heading to cerebral cortex receives all sensory impulses (except smell) channels impulses to appropriate part of cerebral cortex for interpretation Hypothalamus maintains homeostasis by regulating internal activities Heart rate/ blood pressure Body temp/ Control of hunger/ bodyweight Pituitary gland/growth Sleep/wakefulness links nervous and endocrine systems

5 5 Structures in the region of the diencephalon are also important in controlling emotional responses: Limbic System: Controls emotional experience and expression and can modify the way a person acts, producing feelings such as fear, anger, pleasure, and sorrow Reacts to life-threatening upsets By causing pleasant/unpleasant feelings about experiences it guides behavior that may increase the chance of survival Interpret sensory impulses from the receptors associated with the sense of smell Ex: the smell of baking cookies reminds you of you mother

6 Diencephalon Video 6

7 7 Brain Stem

8 Pg. 28 The Brainstem Midbrain Pons Medulla Oblongata

9 9 Brain Stem Three Parts 1.Midbrain Pons Medulla Oblongata Please get out 3 colors Color code picture to match notes

10 10 Midbrain Between diencephalon and pons Join lower parts of brainstem and spinal cord with higher part of brain Contains reflex centers that move the eyes to view something as the head turns, move head to hear sounds more distinctly, and controls reflexes that maintain posture

11 11 Pons Between medulla oblongata and midbrain Relays nerve impulses to and from medulla oblongata and cerebrum Helps regulate rate and depth of breathing

12 12 Medulla Oblongata Enlarged continuation of spinal cord Conducts impulses between brain and spinal cord Contains cardiac (heart rate), vasomotor (blood pressure), and respiratory control centers (rate, rhythm, and depth of breathing) Contains various non-vital reflex control centers (coughing, sneezing, swallowing, vomiting) INJURIES HERE ARE OFTEN FATAL

13 Pg. 28 The Brainstem Midbrain Pons Medulla Oblongata PICTURES of FUNCTIONS PICTURES of FUNCTIONS PICTURES of FUNCTIONS

14 14 Notebook Check on Wednesday!!!

15 Sponge: Set up Cornell Notes on pg. 31 Topic: 11.5 Reticular Formation and the Cerebellum Essential Question: NO EQ!!!! 2.1 Atoms, Ions, and Molecules 11.5 Reticular Formation and the Cerebellum NOTEBOOKS DUE TOMORROW!!!! 415 pts Brain Labeling Quiz on TOMORROW !!!!

16 16 Reticular Formation Complex network of nerve fibers scattered throughout the brain stem Arouses cerebral cortex into state of wakefulness without this stimulation, the cortex remains unaware of stimulation and cannot interpret sensory info or carry on thought processes Decreased activity leads to sleep!

17 17 Types of Sleep Slow Wave non-REM sleep person is tired restful dreamless reduced blood pressure and respiratory rate ranges from light to heavy alternates with REM sleep Rapid Eye Movement (REM) “paradoxical” sleep some areas of brain active heart and respiratory rates irregular dreaming occurs Normal sleep results from decreasing activity of the reticular formation

18 18 Pg. 30 Sleep Disorders What are some sleep disorders you may have heard of? Sleep Apnea Sleep Walking Narcolepsy Insomnia Night Terrors Sleep Talking

19 19 Insomnia: Inability to fall or remain asleep (10% of population) Narcolepsy: Abnormal REM sleep causes EXTREME daytime sleepiness ( % of population) Sleep Apnea: Upper airway collapses repeatedly during sleep, blocking breathing. Snoring and daytime sleepiness Parasomnias: Sleepwalking, sleep talking, and night terrors. (<5% of children )

20 20 Sleep paralysis: Inability to move for up to a few minutes after awakening or when falling asleep Sleep paralysis is a feeling of being conscious but unable to move It occurs when a person passes between stages of wakefulness and sleep During these transitions, you may be unable to move or speak for a few seconds up to a few minutes. Some people may also feel pressure or a sense of choking. Sleep paralysis usually occurs at one of two times. If it occurs while you are falling asleep, it's called predormital sleep paralysis. If it happens as you are waking up, it's called postdormital sleep paralysis. As you fall asleep, your body slowly relaxes. Usually you become less aware, so you do not notice the change. However, if you remain or become aware while falling asleep, you may notice that you cannot move or speak. Many people that experience sleep paralysis are struck with a deep sense of terror, because they sense a menacing presence in the room while paralyzed—sometimes referred to as the intruder. The emergency response activates in the brain when individuals wake up paralyzed and feel vulnerable to attack. This helplessness can intensify the effects of the threat response well above the level typical to normal dreams; this could explain why hallucinations during sleep paralysis are so vivid.

21 21

22 22 Cerebellum Cerebellum: Integrates sensory information concerning position of body parts Coordinates skeletal muscle activity Maintains posture Receives sensory impulses from receptors in muscles, tendons, joints, and the eyes and ears Damage to the cerebellum may result in tremors, inaccurate movements, loss of muscle tone, loss of equilibrium

23 The Brainstem and Cerebellum Videos 2m41s 2m12s 23

24 24 Major Parts of the Brain

25 25 Review: A Closer Look at the Brain Video (5m23s)

26 26 Notebook Check Tomorrow!!!


Download ppt "Sponge: Set up Cornell Notes on pg. 29 Topic: 11.6 The Diencephalon and Brainstem Essential Question: On the picture provided, please describe the major."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google