Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Chang SR, Kobetic R, Triolo RJ. Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Chang SR, Kobetic R, Triolo RJ. Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications."— Presentation transcript:

1 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Chang SR, Kobetic R, Triolo RJ. Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications for motor system neuroprostheses after paralysis. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2014;51(9):1339–52. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications for motor system neuroprostheses after paralysis Sarah R. Chang, BS; Rudi Kobetic, MS; Ronald J. Triolo, PhD

2 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Chang SR, Kobetic R, Triolo RJ. Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications for motor system neuroprostheses after paralysis. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2014;51(9):1339–52. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Aim – Examine biomechanics of stand-to-sit (STS) maneuver in nondisabled individuals and individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) who use implanted neuroprostheses. Relevance – STS maneuver involves eccentric contractions of quadriceps, which is difficult to achieve with stimulation alone and presents unique challenges to lower-limb neuroprostheses.

3 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Chang SR, Kobetic R, Triolo RJ. Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications for motor system neuroprostheses after paralysis. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2014;51(9):1339–52. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Method Participants performed at least 5 STS maneuvers. – Nondisabled: Performed STS at preferred comfortable pace while keeping hands on walker. – SCI using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS): Performed STS utilizing their preprogrammed, open-loop FNS pattern. Biomechanics of STS were described and compared: – Impact forces, upper-limb forces, vertical acceleration at impact, knee and hip kinematics.

4 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Chang SR, Kobetic R, Triolo RJ. Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications for motor system neuroprostheses after paralysis. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2014;51(9):1339–52. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Results When using open-loop ramp down stimulation pattern for sitting down, SCI subjects’ upper-limb forces, vertical acceleration of sacrum at impact, and sitting impact forces were greater than those of nondisabled controls.

5 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Chang SR, Kobetic R, Triolo RJ. Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications for motor system neuroprostheses after paralysis. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2014;51(9):1339–52. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Conclusion Results indicate that additional interventions are needed to: – Better control descent. – Minimize impact. – Gently transition from standing to sitting to achieve more natural movement and reduce injury risk.


Download ppt "This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Chang SR, Kobetic R, Triolo RJ. Understanding stand-to-sit maneuver: Implications."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google