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Monday 25 February 2013. Community values Expectations Bureaucratic needs Nature of business Technology Community awareness Internationalism Pace of.

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Presentation on theme: "Monday 25 February 2013. Community values Expectations Bureaucratic needs Nature of business Technology Community awareness Internationalism Pace of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Monday 25 February 2013

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3 Community values Expectations Bureaucratic needs Nature of business Technology Community awareness Internationalism Pace of change Ensure that you have an explanation and examples for each reason listed above!

4 Formal methods – actions through the formal structures of government or parliament such as a government law reform body e.g. VLRC; ALRC; Parliamentary committees, Royal Commissions, boards of inquiry etc. Informal methods – Individuals (petitions, letter-writing, speak to MPs); groups (interest groups, e.g. Amnesty Intl; industry groups, e.g. Business Council of Australia; professional groups e.g. Victorian Bar).

5 Lobbying (direct approach) Petition Media Submissions Demonstrations Civil disobedience Political action Court action See page of textbook **Ensure you can explain each method and discuss its strengths and weaknesses. In particular, petitions, demonstrations and using the media are mentioned specifically in the VCAA Study Design.**

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9 Visit the Victorian Law Reform Commission at

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14 Established in 2001 by the Victorian Law Reform Commission Act 2000 (Vic) Independent, government-funded body Role: Investigate legal issues and make recommendations Process: Conduct consultations with the community Mostly initiated by the attorney-general – issues to be investigated outlined in a ‘reference’ Can make recommendations for minor legislative changes without a reference Reports recommendations to the attorney-general A-G tables reports in Parliament WHY?

15 From the VLRC website: “The Victorian Law Reform Commission is an independent, government-funded organisation that develops, reviews and recommends reform of Victoria's state laws.” “The Commission has a charter to consult with the community and advise the Attorney-General on how to improve and update Victorian laws.” **Note: The VLRC does not change the law. It can only make recommendations for changes in the law to Parliament. It is only Parliament that can change the law, through the legislative process.**

16 Answer Questions 1-8 Aim: To understand the role of the VLRC and the processes used to assess the need for a change to the law by looking at a specific case study.


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