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Presentation by John Winterdyk Director, Centre for Criminology and Justice Research Mount Royal University Calgary, Alberta, CANADA Adjunct professor:

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Presentation on theme: "Presentation by John Winterdyk Director, Centre for Criminology and Justice Research Mount Royal University Calgary, Alberta, CANADA Adjunct professor:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Presentation by John Winterdyk Director, Centre for Criminology and Justice Research Mount Royal University Calgary, Alberta, CANADA Adjunct professor: St. Thomas Un, Un. of Regina and Polytechnic of Namibia Sept. 22, 2011 Sept. 22, /9/2015ESC - Sept /11 1

2  What is the Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice Research (CCJR)?  What theoretical model/assumption?  Why is the CCJR involved in supporting social interventions designed to prevent offending?  How is the CCJR attempting to bridge the implementation gap?  How can the CCJR share and expand it scope and relationship internationally?  What lessons learned/to share? 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /112

3 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /113

4  The CCJR – why? ◦ Established Jan ◦ unique ◦ funding ◦ Staff  Students, network of advisory/consultants ◦ Project scope ◦ Political quandary – Omnibus Bill (Sept. 20/11) 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /114

5  Types: ◦ Primary – individual and family levels factors (parenting skills) ◦ Secondary – strategies/techniques to address RISK factors (police hot spots; social programs – D. Olds prenatal) ◦ Tertiary – after crime occurs (post 9/11 and border security, airport screening)  Addressing offences vs. offending  Addressing protective and risk factors ◦ The multiplicity and diversity of the risk factors  SROI 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /115

6  Individual ◦ Prior history ◦ Drugs and/or alcohol ◦ Limited education ◦ Mental health ◦ (Violent) victimization ◦ Low/poor self-control…impulsive  Peer group ◦ Interaction with other delinquents ◦ Street socialization ◦ Friends who use drugs and/or are involved in gang activities 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /116

7  School ◦ Poor performance, low aspirations, poor teacher role models…  Family ◦ Unstable home environment, drugs/crime in the family, extreme economic deprivation…  Community ◦ Notable social disorganization…drugs, DV, gangs, etc. 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /117

8  Protective factors ◦ Positive attitudes, values or beliefs /positive self-esteem ◦ Conflict resolution skills ◦ Good mental, physical, spiritual and emotional health ◦ Success at school / steady employment / stable housing ◦ Good parenting skills ◦ Strong social supports ◦ Community engagement ◦ Problem-solving skills ◦ Positive adult role models, coaches, mentors ◦ Healthy prenatal and early childhood development ◦ Good peer group/friends /social network ◦ Availability of services (social, recreational, cultural, etc.) 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /118

9  a principles-based method for measuring extra- financial value  UK roots around 2006 (NL also active) ◦ BENEFITS: Communication; more effective decisions; focus on the important; investment mentality; clarity of governance ◦ LIMITATIONS: not everything can be monetized; over- reliance; intensive first time; some outcomes (self- esteem) cannot be monetized 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /119

10  Safe(r) Communities  “brings together provincial & municipal governments + law enforcement agencies + community groups + the business sector + social agencies to ensure Alberta remains a place where we are all free to live, work and thrive.” ◦ 9 prov. ministries! ◦ $60+ million over 5 years (SCIF) ◦ Seed money to the CCJR ◦ Community hearings ◦ Report and 32 recommendations  Gang reduction, safe communities, youth at risk  Shift to prevention and engage communities 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /1110

11  15+ projects  Topics range from: ◦ Human trafficking – better service and support ◦ Identity theft – ◦ Bullying - ◦ Domestic violence – ◦ Youth gangs – ◦ Dating violence –  Current projects: ◦ Teen courts – viable alternative? ◦ Homelessness – impact of by-laws ◦ Human trafficking – ◦ PACT – police and mental health ◦ Building Bridges ◦ Domestic violence 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /1111

12  !total cost of crime per year $47 billion CDN  1993 Bob Horner report on Crime Prevention ◦ 1% of CJS budget per year towards CP over five years ◦ 5% of budget after 5 years…reality!  1996 report by NCPC (National CP Council) ◦ The evidence is conclusive that the most effective way to prevent crime is to:  ensure healthier children,  stronger families,  better schools, and;  more cohesive communities.  Crime prevention through social development (CPSD) is a sound investment. 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /1112

13  Evidence-led practice  Integration  Partnerships  Responsive to local communities  Measurable results 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /1113

14  School age children/youth (multiple risk factors): ◦ S4 Project – Start Smart Stay Safe – police, schools boards, & community partners. A strength based model …build ‘resilience’  universal  Aboriginal and Northern communities ◦ 3% of pop. 20+% offender population  Drugs, gangs, homelessness, etc.  foreigners  ‘Newcomers’ – anomie, opportunity, education…numerous risk factors  Priority crime issues: youth gangs, drug-related crimes, homelessness, transnational crime 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /1114

15  Bridging linkages between government, NGOs, CJS agencies – link evidence based research to programs/capacity building  Avoiding ‘displacement’ effect ◦ collective  International collaboration… “we’re all dealing with the same thing” ◦ Invest in social development/opportunity  Incorporating SROIs into evaluations  Avoiding “death by project”… strategies to help sustainability of the successful programs  Thank you!  please visit us 5/9/2015ESC - Sept /1115


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