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Diverse Learners CoP: Building Schoolwide Systems of Positive Behavior Support: Part II: Secondary Prevention Facilitator: Donna Lupatkin Guest: Howard.

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Presentation on theme: "Diverse Learners CoP: Building Schoolwide Systems of Positive Behavior Support: Part II: Secondary Prevention Facilitator: Donna Lupatkin Guest: Howard."— Presentation transcript:

1 Diverse Learners CoP: Building Schoolwide Systems of Positive Behavior Support: Part II: Secondary Prevention Facilitator: Donna Lupatkin Guest: Howard S. Muscott, Ed.D. NH Center for Effective Behavioral Interventions and Supports Date: June 1, 2009

2 Goals for Today 1.To learn about the fundamental assumptions and beliefs behind the secondary prevention or targeted system of PBIS 2.To learn two of practice features of the secondary prevention or targeted system of PBIS – early identification and Teacher Check, Connect and Expect.

3 Agenda 1.Welcome and Introductions 2.Brief Overview of PBIS and Primary Prevention 3.Secondary Prevention Features –Early Identification Teacher and Parent Referral Indicators and Cut Scores Systematic Screening –Teacher Check, Connect and Expect 4.Final Discussion 5.Let’s Party! Celebration of our CoP Experiences

4 Meet Howard Muscott

5 Howard’s Background Howard Muscott is director of the New Hampshire Center for Effective Behavioral Interventions and Support, a statewide technical assistance and training network aimed at promoting positive and preventive school discipline systems and improving the emotional well-being of all children. Howard has more than 30 years of experience in education ranging from preschool through high school and higher education. He has been a special education teacher and principal at three schools for students with disabilities. He recently retired as professor of education from Rivier College where he directed the Undergraduate Special Education program and the graduate program in Emotional and Behavioral Disorders for 15 years.

6 PBIS is a systematic framework for improving valued social, emotional, behavioral and learning outcomes for children in K-12 schools. PBIS uses a broad set of evidence-based systemic and individualized strategies to effectively prevent and respond to problem behavior. PBIS is a strategic approach in which collaborative teams use effective group processes and data-based decision-making to achieve desired outcomes. Muscott & Mann (2007) What is PBIS?

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8 Primary Prevention: Universal Approaches 9. Data-Based Decision Making 3. Schoolwide Expectations for All Locations 2. Communication with Staff and Families 7. Responding to Problem Behavior 5. Teach Expectations in Locations 6. Recognize Students for Exhibiting Expected Behaviors 1.Universal TeamUniversal Team and Processes Muscott & Mann (2006) DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES 4. Classroom Management 8. Systematic Screening

9 Features of Secondary Prevention

10 Secondary Prevention Targeted Approaches A Function-Based Perspective 2. Data-Based Decision Making 4. Early Identification and Referral Processes 3. Communication with Staff and Families 6. Targeted Group Interventions 7. Functional Assessment Muscott & Mann (2007) DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES 5. Teacher Check, Connect, Expect Universal Primary Prevention SAU/District-wide Administrative Team 1. Targeted Team and Processes 8. Behavior Support Planning

11 A 3-Tier Approach Level 2, secondary prevention, is aimed at the roughly 5-10% of students considered at risk for developing behavioral disorders or mental illness These students enter school with significant risk factors and are usually unresponsive to universal prevention strategies alone.

12 A 3-Tier Approach The goal is two-fold: –To decrease opportunities in which high-risk behaviors might be fostered –To establish effective and efficient prosocial repertoires that would increase their responsiveness to primary interventions Secondary interventions must be structured to meet needs of at-risk youth such as group interventions that target areas of student need such as substance abuse, depression/suicide, and antisocial behavior

13 Secondary Prevention Targeted Approaches A Function-Based Perspective 4. Early Identification and Referral Processes Muscott & Mann (2007) DATASYSTEMS PRACTICES

14 Methods of Early Identification to Targeted Team 1.Teacher or Parent Referral Rivka: No formal form or system 2.Cut Scores on Key Behavioral Indicators 3.Systematic Screening

15 Using Data to Identify Students at Risk

16 Multiple Gate Screening Stage 1 involves teacher nomination and rank ordering of students along two dimensions of behavior disorders – internalizing & externalizing. Stage 2 requires that teachers complete the BASC- 2 Behavioral Emotional Screening System for each of the nominated students. Students whose elevated scores exceed the established cut off are candidates for Stage 3. At Stage 3, the student is referred to the appropriate school-based team to determine additional diagnostic assessments and appropriate interventions.

17 Discussion What kind of indicators would be worrisome? –Not being able to fit into the behavioral norm of the school, e.g., listening/following directions, easily getting upset, etc. What is too much of that behavior? –What more information do we need? How can we make a decision if our worry is justified?

18 Implementation Procedures Stage One: Rank Ordering Students 1.Identify groups of students in his/her classroom that closely match the internalizing and externalizing profiles. 2.Rank order students in two groups according to the degree or extent to which each one matches the behavioral profile.

19 Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders Hill Walker Herb Severson Oregon Research Institute

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21 Stage One: Nominating Internalizing Students Internalizing refers to all behavior problems that are directed inwardly (i.e., away from the external social environment) and represent problems with self. Internalizing behavior problems are often self-imposed and frequently involve behavioral deficits and patterns of social avoidance.

22 BASC-2 Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Randy Kamphaus & Cecil Reynolds Pearson Publishers

23 Stage Two: Administration of BASC- 2 Behavioral Emotional Screening Administer the BASC-2 BESS Teacher Form Level Child/Adolescent. 27 Questions – 5-10 minutes. Each item rated Never, Sometimes, Often and Almost Always. Never means that you have not observed it. Mark every item with best estimate.

24 Antrim Elementary School Eagle Soars

25 Antrim Elementary School (K-4 th Grade) Enrollment 133 students in 9 classrooms 98% Caucasian; 1% Hispanic; 1% African American 15% Free and reduced lunch NECAP Reading 84% (3 rd ); 81% (4 th ); 71% (5 th )

26 Antrim Elementary School Screening Example 9 classrooms screened 1st grade through 4 th grade teachers used SSBD gate 1 and identified 3 internalizers and 3 externalizers (Gate 1) Six students from the 7 classrooms were assessed using the BESS Kindergarten teacher screened all students using BESS in am and pm sections 23 of 130 students or 18% scored elevated or extremely elevated

27 Antrim Elementary School Process Team met with every teacher of the 22 students for minutes to discuss results and other data –Attendance, tardies, nurse office visits, NWEA academic scores, office discipline referrals and teacher judgments about academic performance All families contacted and decision made to offer group intervention support for all 22 students 21 of 22 families agreed to accept supports

28 Antrim Elementary School “This was the best public relations activity I’ve ever done. I told the families we were offering their child support before there were problems at school, before they got frustrated and before they would lose ground academically and socially. The families were grateful.” James Elder, Assistant Principal

29 Secondary Prevention Targeted Approaches A Function-Based Perspective Muscott & Mann (2007) DATA SYSTEMS PRACTICES 5. Teacher Check, Connect, Expect Universal Primary Prevention SAU/District-wide Administrative Team

30 Teacher Check, Connect and Expect (TCCE) is a highly efficient, early, systematic response for students who do not respond to primary systems of behavior support. TCCE occurs prior to implementing more sophisticated/ less efficiently accessed secondary supports. Mann and Muscott (2007); Adapted from Cheney (2007) Teacher Check, Connect and Expect

31 Discussion What are things that work? –Connecting the child and teacher –Being clear about the expectations. –Adding more structure at the beginning of the day and periodically throughout the day –Increasing specific praise for targeted behavior –Creating a goal and work towards hitting that goal

32 TCCE offers an immediate/low effort approach whereby teachers: 1)Greet students at the beginning of the day/ beginning of class (MS/HS). 2)Rate behavior on a daily report card at scheduled intervals throughout the day. 3)Provide brief end-of-day review, feedback and encouragement on student performance relative to pre-established criteria. Teacher Check, Connect and Expect

33 Student Nominated for Teacher Check, Connect and Expect Systematic Screening Meets Criteria for Non-response to Primary Supports Teacher or Parent Referral Parental Approval / SC Coach Assigned Review Meeting Date Set Teacher(s) ‘Coached’ CCE Implemented Classroom Teacher feedback at set intervals throughout day CCE Card with SW Behavioral Expectations Provided in AM CCE Coach Summarizes Data Keeps Targeted Team informed Meet after 20 School Days with Student, Teacher, Parent to Review Progress Exit Program Revise Program One Minute Review at end of day with Classroom Teacher / Lead Teacher Sheet to Coach Consider Different Support Mann & Muscott (2007); Adapted from Crone, Horner, Hawken (2004)

34 Sandown North School ‘Teacher Check, Connect & Expect’ Name: ____________________________ Today is:___________________________ I would like to meet with coach during office hours ____ Teacher:____________ I earned: _____smiles I needed: 42 smiles 2 = no verbal reminder 1 = no reminder slip 0 = reminder slip given or office referral ArrivalMid MorningBefore Lunch After Lunch/Recess Mid Afternoon Pack-up Safe Trustworthy Always Respectful Responsible Did I do it today? Yes ______ No ______ Total:_________ 1/06/08

35 Sandown North Elementary School Teacher Check Connect, Expect 15 students; 9 successful; 4 modify; 1 FBA/BSP; 1 out

36 Discussion of Teacher Check, Connect and Expect Would you be able to implement Teacher, Check, Connect and Expect? –We would need to do more coaching of the teachers. What worries would teachers have?

37 Resources Applying Positive Behavioral Support and Functional Behavioral Assessment in Schools by OSEP Center on PBIS at the University of Oregon. 7 Steps for Developing a Proactive Schoolwide Discipline Plan: A Guide for Principals and Leadership Teams by Geoff Colvin. Implementing Positive Behavior Support Systems in Early Childhood and Elementary Settings by Melissa Stormont, Timothy J. Lewis, Rebecca Sue Beckner, and Nanci W. JohnsonImplementing Positive Behavior Support Systems in Early Childhood and Elementary Settings Building Positive Behavior Support Systems in Schools: Functional Behavioral Assessment by Deanne A. Crone and Robert H. HornerBuilding Positive Behavior Support Systems in Schools: Functional Behavioral Assessment Parenting With Positive Behavior Support: A Practical Guide to Resolving Your Child's Difficult Behavior by Meme Hieneman, Karen Childs, and Jane SergayParenting With Positive Behavior Support: A Practical Guide to Resolving Your Child's Difficult Behavior –www.pbis.org;

38 Howard Muscott, Ed.D. Director, NH CEBIS at SERESC ; (cell)

39 Diverse Learners CoP Let’s party!

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41 Goals What is the next chapter to our story? Distill and discuss lessons learned from the content of our calls and share how we have grown as a community Celebrate, celebrate, celebrate!

42 Let’s laugh Why did the teacher wear sunglasses?

43 Ha Because his students were so bright!

44 Let’s try again What do you call a duck that gets all “A”s in school?

45 OK, so it’s not so funny A wise quacker

46 Hidden Sparks Before we look back, it is only fair to share what we know about what will be coming in the future.

47 Setting the Context: Our Geese Story Animal research shows geese behave as very effective groups. When flying in formation, each bird flaps its wings and creates uplift for the bird immediately following. By flying in such a “V” formation, the whole flock adds at least 71% greater flying range than if each bird flew on its own, Whenever a goose falls out of formation, it suddenly feels the drag and resistance of trying to go it alone and quickly gets back into formation to take advantage of the power of the flock. When the lead goose tires, he rotates back in the wing and another goose takes over. Without a thought, the lead goose turns over leadership of the group who has fresh energy.

48 The geese honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep up their speed. When a goose gets sick or is wounded by a gunshot and falls out of formation, two more geese fall out of the formation and follow the injured one down to help and protect him. They stay with him until he is either able to fly or until he is dead. And then, they launch out with another formation to catch up with their group. Finally, relying on their group instincts, the signals and the wisdom of individual members of the flock, the flock modifies its course when they sense an adverse condition ahead of them. Thus, the flock plans for changes that may affect them adversely, rather than reacting to those changes which come up unexpectedly. Their combined instincts, loyalty and lack of ego keep the group in tact, because survival is the goal which drives their actions. They are a hardy group, as witnessed by their vast population increase despite some very real threats to their survival. The next time you see a formation of geese, remember... As a member of a community, your chances for survival and prosperity are vastly increased. It is a reward, a challenge, and a privilege to be a contributing member of a community!

49 Discussion Given the lessons we can garner from our fine feathered friends, how has our community of practice given us the strength of a shared destination and best practice ideas in order to help us and our schools to move forward?

50 Discussion What are those Nuggets?

51 Shared Destination and Community Knowing that there are other people with the same questions has been helpful. The planning of the Assembly was an important experience for me professionally.

52 Best Practice Ideas Conversations around the importance of collecting data Looking at different levels of interventions General capacity building

53 What’s Next? How can we share leadership to best assure a continuation of our community and practice activities? What are you interested and willing to do to be proactive in planning for the future of our community?

54 Thank You!!!!! L’hitraot

55 PEJE wishes to thank Hidden Sparks for their generous support of our CoP


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