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November 14, 2012 US-Canada Northern Oil and Gas Research Forum Anchorage, Alaska Building Sustainable Communities in the Arctic: the Resources and Sustainability.

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Presentation on theme: "November 14, 2012 US-Canada Northern Oil and Gas Research Forum Anchorage, Alaska Building Sustainable Communities in the Arctic: the Resources and Sustainability."— Presentation transcript:

1 November 14, 2012 US-Canada Northern Oil and Gas Research Forum Anchorage, Alaska Building Sustainable Communities in the Arctic: the Resources and Sustainability in the Arctic Project Lee Huskey University of Alaska Anchorage

2 ReSDA ? Largest social science research project ever proposed for the Circumpolar North currently involves 51 researchers at 29 universities in 9 countries The primary objective of the research will be to develop innovative approaches to using natural resources to improve the well-being of northern communities while preserving the region’s unique ecosystem. Focus on questions of finding out how to maximize benefits of resource development to northern regions and communities and minimize the social, economic, cultural, and environmental costs.

3 International Team of Researchers

4 Why ReSDA? The need for research useful to communities: Increased economic activity in the Arctic and limited, scattered, social science research. Antecedents: Social Economy Research Network for Northern Canada and its community partners (Northern Research Institute in Yukon, Aurora Research Institute in NWT, Nunavut Research Institute in Iqaluit, Makivik, Labrador Institute, Arctic Co-ops) Antecedents: University of the Arctic workshops, ESF Boreas program, Alaska OCS Studies Program Funded by Canada Social Science and Humanities Research Council

5 Initial Projects: Gap Analysis What do we know about the effects of resource development on the north? Where do we go from there? Main themes: 1.History of Resource Development 2.Impacts of development on Northern communities 3.Measuring impacts 4.Resource Revenue regimes 5.Impacts assessment 6.Regional economic development 7.Community well being and development 8.Community-Industry relations 9.Impact Benefit Agreements 10.Comprehensive land claims and protection of livelihoods 11.Traditional knowledge and resource development 12.Resources and Environmental Issues 13.Climate change

6 Initial Project: IRC Social Indicators Purpose: develop a set of measurable, reliable and accessible indicators to monitor socio-economic conditions in the Inuvialuit Region with an emphasis on tracing impacts of resource development Partners: ReSDA, ASI, Inuvialuit Regional Corporation (IRC), NWT Bureau of Statistics Precedents: NWT Diamond mine socio-economic agreement, OCS Social Indicators, Arctic Social Indicators IRC Data Base: Early collaboration with NWT Bureau of Statistics (data back to 1991).

7 Why Social Indicators? “Find a small number of tractable indicators that can be used in tracking changes in key elements in the Arctic over time.” Track changes in well-being over time and compare. Look at impact of particular events on social welfare. Arctic Social Indicators domains: fate control, cultural integrity, contact with nature, material well-being, education, and demographic health.

8 IRC Project Database for long period (1991) Recent resource development activity Desire of IRC to understand effects of resource development. Problem with the availability and timeliness of data, especially at the community level.

9 Inuvialuit Region Trends Material well-being Unemployment – unchanged Participation rate Professional employment Income support payments Ownership rate Households in core need Education Population with high school diploma Social Lone parent families Crime Teen birth Mobility Traditional activities Hunt & Fish County food, % Speak Language Positive Negative

10 Inuvialuit Region Baseline Analysis Regional Comparisons: – Internal differences: drastic gap between Inuvik and other communities IR better than other NWT regions: unemployment, engagement in traditional activities, land claim status and fate control IR close to average: incomes, dependency on government transfers, consumption of county food, education IR worse: language retention (23%), Aboriginal leadership, population dynamics (out-migration) – Compared to other Inuit communities (in Nunavut): Generally good in material well-being Very low in language retention, low on consumption of traditional food, fate control

11 Contact Information ReSDA Social Indicators project IRC data base ReSDA project leader: Chris Southcott, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario


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