Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Sonnet Text Work By Larry Gleason. Sonnet XXIX -- 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Sonnet Text Work By Larry Gleason. Sonnet XXIX -- 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sonnet Text Work By Larry Gleason

2 Sonnet XXIX When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

3 You may need several copies of the sonnet as you work so that your text markings remain readable. Let’s start with Sonnet 29: When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,

4 Where to begin? Ask Questions. You may need several copies of the sonnet as you work so that text makings remain readable.

5 Quatrains and Couplet Mark Quatrains. (3 Quatrains, 4 lines each) Mark the Couplet. (Last 2 lines) Are they in perfect form or against form? Note where they are against form.

6 Quatrains for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Q1 Q2 Q3 Couplet

7 Sentences Mark the sentences. They end where there are periods. Sentence=Idea. How many main ideas? Enumerate them. Notice how ideas are constructed with semi-colons; colons: and commas,. Are there Enjambments? Mark them.

8 Sentences for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. One sentence

9 Enjambments for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Q1 Q2 Q3 Cou- plet

10 Scanning How does it scan? Force it into ˘ ˉ ˘ ˉ ˘ ˉ ˘ ˉ ˘ ˉ (short, long, short, long, etc,) Is the scan regular (easy to force)? To help it stay regular, can any words elide? Where is it irregular (can’t be forced), creating feminine endings, long lines, trochees, etc.)? Mark them.

11 Scanning for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,* And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. *a troublesome line that may defy consensus Elision Trochee Feminine ending Trochee Feminine ending No Elision

12 A Troubling Scan: A bastard scan. Choosing to force the scan so that deaf is long stressed? And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries. The easiest rhythm: -double long stress trouble -elide heaven to heav’n -double short stress with my: And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries.

13 Rhyme Scheme What is the rhyme scheme? Are there visual rhymes as well as aural rhymes? Q3 EFEF Couplet GG Q1 ABAB Q2 CDCD

14 Rhyme Scheme for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Q1 ABAB Q2 CDCD Q3 EFEF Couplet GG

15 Repeated Words What words are repeated? Why they have been repeated? Make sure you include variants and root forms. When you finish you are likely to have found your---- Theme(s)

16 THEME Subject Meditation Topic Idea Motif Subject Matter Argument Premise Thesis Sonnet Tie

17 Finding our Theme Important Repeated Words for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Q1 Q2 Q3 Couplet

18 These repeat too, but so what? When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

19 Antithesis (Compare/Contrasts) What words, phrases or images are put into compare/contrasts or Antithesis? Mark them, connect with lines.

20 Antithesis (Compare/Contrast) in Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy / contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Compare/ Contrast: Antithesis: Antithesis: (Brighting day/gloomy night) Q1 Q2 Q3 Couplet

21 Definitions Do you know all the words? If not look them up and get a definition.

22 Words to look up for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

23 Beginnings, Middles and Ends Can this sonnet be broken up into beginnings, middles and ends? –What is the proposed issue? –What is the debate? –What is the conclusion? Think bookends.

24 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. B Proposal or set up M debate E conclusion Beginnings Middles Ends for Sonnet 29

25 Relationships Who is the Speaker? Who is the Speaker speaking to? What is the Relationship? What’s right in the Relationship? What’s wrong in the Relationship? What does the Speaker hope to accomplish? What does the Speaker need to change?

26 I to my love, who seems not to be here. I need to move myself to a different psychological plain (social plain to natural or elemental plain.) When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

27 Time What is the time frame?

28 Time: A time of disgrace in the past, present and unforeseeable future, until I dream myself into a different past to create a different present and perhaps a different future. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

29 Parentheticals Are there ideas that contain parenthetical thoughts (momentary digressions or explanations) other than what Shakespeare spells out (with actual parentheses) for you? Mark them. –Once marked, can you drop them out and still make sense of the idea at hand?

30 Parenthetical ideas provided by Shakespeare and by my own marking. When (in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes), I (all alone) beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven (with my bootless cries), And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, (Featured like him, like him with friends possessed), (Desiring this man's art and that man's scope), With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts (myself almost despising), Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

31 Major Tonal Shift Where is the major tonal shift in the sonnet? Mark it.

32 Major Tonal Shift for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Q1 Q2 Q3 Major Tonal Shift Couplet

33 Imagery What kind of images are conjured? Quoting the original text, pick out each image, then describe that same image in your own words. Are there lists of images? Are they cumulative—pieces that build to a bigger, more substantive whole? Are they in opposition to each other creating an internal debate?

34 Images for Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Senses within –eyes, ears, mouth: Q1, Senses looking out: Q2 State- outcast state AND state of acceptance Heaven and earth: freedom/bird/flight, dawn of new day music, love, wealth

35 Punning Sonnets are witty word games. Treat it like an acrostic or crossword puzzle, etc. What word games are there (punning)? Mark them.

36 Punning in Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

37 Literary Devices Are there lists such as Verb Lists? Noun Lists? Other word lists? Mark them. Are there internal vowel sounds in close proximity to each other repeated (Assonance)? Are there consonant sounds in close proximity to each other repeated (Alliteration)? Are there words that are, through imitation of their sound, rhetorically effective? (Onomatopoeia)?

38 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Literary Devices in Sonnet 29 Verb List 1 Verb List 2 Assonance-nothing remarkable here Alliteration 1 (l, k) Alliteration 2 (s,h) Onomatopoeia- nothing remarkable here

39 Syntax Is there Old English, Elizabethan or difficult syntax? Mark it.

40 Difficult Syntax in Sonnet 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Old English: Beweep Bootless Haply Rememb’red Thy Thee

41 Caesura: sĭ-zhoo’-rah Where can we use caesuras to help us phrase things better? Mark your caesuras. A caesura is: A pause in a line of verse dictated by sense or natural speech rhythm rather than by punctuation alone. In Latin and Greek prosody, a break in a line caused by the ending of a word within a foot, especially when this coincides with a sense division. Music A pause or breathing at a point of rhythmic division in a melody.

42 Caesuras in Sonnet 29 When //in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself //and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one //more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art //and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy //contented least; Yet in these thoughts //myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (Like to the lark //at break of day arising From sullen earth) //sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love rememb’red //such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state //with kings. // marks suggested caesuras, entered only where punctuation does not already exist Q3

43 The Moment Before/ The Moment After Once the sonnet has been thoroughly examined, what is the moment before (30 seconds or less prior to the first spoken word)? What happens after the sonnet is through (immediately after the last word)?

44 Making Sonnet 29 actable Create an event that spurs the first line: i. e., the prison doors just slammed. Create an event that lingers after: i.e., I curl up in a fetal position and sleep.

45 Your Sonnet All of these questions and examinations are found in one list: Sonnet Text Work. Before memorizing, go through the questions and work out your answers. Then prepare your sonnet so that you are speaking to someone. Create a scenario where your sonnet might exist including the moment before and the moment after.

46 Sonnet Text Work By Larry Gleason (This is my moment after. Consider yourself released.)


Download ppt "Sonnet Text Work By Larry Gleason. Sonnet XXIX -- 29 When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google