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SHOW AND TELL NO. 1 PICTURES OF BABYLON. "Now The Lord God [see The Logos and Rock Of Ages] had planted a garden in the east, in Eden; and there He put.

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Presentation on theme: "SHOW AND TELL NO. 1 PICTURES OF BABYLON. "Now The Lord God [see The Logos and Rock Of Ages] had planted a garden in the east, in Eden; and there He put."— Presentation transcript:

1 SHOW AND TELL NO. 1 PICTURES OF BABYLON

2 "Now The Lord God [see The Logos and Rock Of Ages] had planted a garden in the east, in Eden; and there He put the man He had formed [see The Creation Of Adam And Eve]. And The Lord God made all kinds of trees grow out of the ground - trees that were pleasing to the eye and good for food. In the middle of the garden were the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil." [see The Two Trees]The LogosRock Of AgesThe Creation Of Adam And EveThe Two Trees "A river watering the garden flowed from Eden, and from there it divided. It had four headstreams. The name of the first is the Pishon. It winds through the entire land of Havilah, where there is gold. The gold of that land is good; aromatic resin and onyx are also there.The name of the second river is the Gihon; it winds through the entire land of Cush. The name of the third river is the Tigris; it runs along the east side of Asshur. And the fourth river is the Euphrates." (Genesis 2:8-14) The land of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers is today in Iraq - a land rich in places related to events of Bible HistoryTigris and Euphrates Rivers Bible History

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4 Brickwork in King Nebuchadnezzar’s Palace Babylon, Iraq In the throne room of King Nebuchadnezzar's palace, Saddam Hussein built much of the brickwork over the ruins. The original bricks are inscribed with words praising Nebuchadnezzar. Above these, Hussein's workers laid bricks inscribed with the words, "In the era of Saddam Hussein, protector of Iraq, who rebuilt civilization and rebuilt Babylon."

5 God. The dragon here is a composite animal with the physical attributes of snake, lion an These brick relieves are not glazed, as the beautiful glazed-brick panels figuring bulls, and lions (symbol of Ishtar) which decorated the Gate, the Palace and th4e Street of Processions, all taken, prior to World War I, to Berlin by the TGerman expedition which excavated Babylon. Along the Street, on the left a brick column is seen, which may have had a statue standing on The Lion of Babylon, large and splendidly carved in basalt, reminds us again that the lion symbol of the goddess Ishtar. In the sculpture, the lion’s back has marks indicating that it was for a precious saddle which the goddess Ishtar would stand. To the south of the Street of Processions is a major temple, the Esagila “The Lofty House”, left to the site of the Stepped Tower of Babylon, which had seven levels rising to a height of 91 meters on a square base also 91 meters square. The Street runs straight until the bridge access Euphrates, which rested on bastions 9 meters thick each. Another temple in the area is Nabushcari, recently dug up with painted murals, the largest to its time. And, as you cross the railway line to the city, you will see a rise, which originally was high with a palace built on it, which archaeologists call the summer palace of Nebuchadnessar upper parts of the back walls are ventilation apertures, which served the inner rooms and hall palace.

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8 As he was pursuing his conquests, Alexander the Great stopped for a time in Babylon and had intended to rebuild. He later returned only to die in it in 322 BC. Seleucus Nicator I, one of his commanders and successors, built Seleucia, south of Baghdad, whereupon Babylon lost its political significance. Penetrated by the Euphrates from north to south, Babylon was surrounded by a moat and a double wall: the outer wall was 16 km long, the inner, 8 km. Straight, wide streets intercrossed, all paved with bricks and bitumen. The most important was the Street of Processions, which passed through Ishtar's Gate and ended in the Stepped Tower. The remains of this street with its bituminous paving are still there to be seen today. Nebuchadnezzar's Southern Palace (190 x 300 m) is situated on the west side of this major street, made up of five courtyards each surrounded by halls and a diversity of chambers, one of which is the throne room (52 x 25 m). The Hanging Gardens, the remains of which are still visible nowadays, were part of this palace. To the east of the Street of Processions lies Nin Makh's Temple, reconstructed recently. To the north are the remains of the Main Palace, where the Lion of Babylon is. It should be noted that many remains lie under the accumulations of later buildings, as the place continued to be inhabited, or have been so submerged by the Euphrates that it is almost impossible to retrieve it. On the way to Babylon, on the right hand side, is the amphitheater, which dates back to the time of Alexander the Great, who for some years made Babylon the capital of his empire. Ishtar Gate, in a depression a little short way off the Street of Processions, still has some of its old wall decorations of bulls, symbol of Adad, god of storms, and dragons, symbol of Marduk, the chief god. The dragon here is a composite animal with the physical attributes of snake, lion and eagle. These brick relieves are not glazed, as the beautiful glazed-brick panels figuring bulls, and dragons and lions (symbol of Ishtar) which decorated the Gate, the Palace and the Street of Processions were all taken, prior to World War I, to Berlin by the German expedition which excavated Babylon then. Along the Street, on the left a brick column is seen, which may have had a statue standing on it.

9 Dateline: June 2, 2003 I was sitting at a computer in Iraq looking for Web sites on ancient Babylon and found your site with the rebuilt ancient gate of Ishtar, at Babylon. We had just received a tour from an Iraqi archaeologist who worked at the ruins. The Marine Public Affairs office coordinated our tour. Most of the rebuilt ruins were from the time of King Nebuchadnezzar II, approximately 600+ through 586 B.C. Saddam's workforce rebuilt over the actual ruins. The archaeologists were against this, but were powerless from stopping Saddam. Older ruins were from the time of King Hammurabi, approximately 1,750 B.C. King Hammurabi was the one who came up with many of the notions we have for a civilized mankind. Marines live in the palace. ~ Daniel O'Connell, Gunnery Sergeant, USMC Marines approach the ancient city of Babylon Photo © 2003, Daniel O'Connell, Gunnery Sergeant, USMC Ancient Architecture of Babylon

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14 Dateline: June 2, 2003 I was sitting at a computer in Iraq looking for Web sites on ancient Babylon and found your site with the rebuilt ancient gate of Ishtar, at Babylon. We had just received a tour from an Iraqi archaeologist who worked at the ruins. The Marine Public Affairs office coordinated our tour. Most of the rebuilt ruins were from the time of King Nebuchadnezzar II, approximately 600+ through 586 B.C. Saddam's workforce rebuilt over the actual ruins. The archaeologists were against this, but were powerless from stopping Saddam. Older ruins were from the time of King Hammurabi, approximately 1,750 B.C. King Hammurabi was the one who came up with many of the notions we have for a civilized mankind. Marines live in the palace. ~ Daniel O'Connell, Gunnery Sergeant, USMC Marines approach the ancient city of Babylon Photo © 2003, Daniel O'Connell, Gunnery Sergeant, USMC Ancient Architecture of Babylon

15 Ancient Babylon (Aerial Views) Babylon, Iraq In these helicopter views, you can see ancient ruins of King Nebuchadnezzar's palace. Babylon – Photo by Daniel O’Connell Gunnery Sergeant, USMC

16 Saddam Hussein's Presidential Palace Babylon, Iraq This helicopter view provides a closer look at Saddam’s Presidential palace. As of June 2, 2003, over 1,000 Marines are working at the base of Saddam’s palace, and all Marines, billet (sleep) in the palace. There is plenty of room to spare. The Marines have set up their two-man tents inside the palace. All windows were vandalized prior to the Marines arriving. Marines sleep in tents at to limit the mosquito exposure. Malaria is an epidemic in this area.

17 King Nebuchadnezzar’s Palace Courtyard Babylon, Iraq In ancient days, the common folk gathered in the main courtyard of King Nebuchadnezzar's palace. The walls were rebuilt by Saddam Hussein over the ancient site. Below, Marines gather with new Iraqi friends in King Nebuchadnezzar’s palace courtyard on April 27, 2003.

18 King Nebuchadnezzar’s Palace Throne Room Babylon, Iraq In the throne room of King Nebuchadnezzar II, which is referred to in the Bible (Book of Daniel, Chapters 1-3). Note. Original bricks at base; all others are Saddam’s bricks.

19 Saddam Hussein's Presidential Palace Babylon, Iraq This helicopter view provides a closer look at Saddam’s Presidential palace. As of June 2, 2003, over 1,000 Marines are working at the base of Saddam’s palace, and all Marines, billet (sleep) in the palace. There is plenty of room to spare. The Marines have set up their two-man tents inside the palace. All windows were vandalized prior to the Marines arriving. Marines sleep in tents at to limit the mosquito exposure. Malaria is an epidemic in this area.

20 Saddam Presidential Palace and ruins of ancient Babylon (Aerial View) Babylon, Iraq Taken from a helicopter, this photograph provides an aerial view of Saddam’s presidential palace (on the hill) at the ruins of ancient Babylon near Al Hillah, Iraq. The Euphrates River is the foreground. The open plain behind the ruins is the area of the Tower of Babel, described in the Book of Genesis.

21 King Nebuchadnezzar’s Palace Courtyard Babylon, Iraq In ancient days, the common folk gathered in the main courtyard of King Nebuchadnezzar's palace. The walls were rebuilt by Saddam Hussein over the ancient site. Below, Marines gather with new Iraqi friends in King Nebuchadnezzar’s palace courtyard on April 27, 2003.

22 Brickwork in King Nebuchadnezzar’s Palace Babylon, Iraq In the throne room of King Nebuchadnezzar's palace, Saddam Hussein built much of the brickwork over the ruins. The original bricks are inscribed with words praising Nebuchadnezzar. Above these, Hussein's workers laid bricks inscribed with the words, "In the era of Saddam Hussein, protector of Iraq, who rebuilt civilization and rebuilt Babylon."

23 King Nebuchadnezzar’s Throne Babylon, Iraq A Marine stands on King Nebuchadnezzar's throne in Babylon.

24 King Nebuchadnezzar’s Palace Throne Room Babylon, Iraq In the throne room of King Nebuchadnezzar II, which is referred to in the Bible (Book of Daniel, Chapters 1-3). Note. Original bricks at base; all others are Saddam’s bricks.

25 King Nebuchadnezzar’s Throne Babylon, Iraq A Marine stands on King Nebuchadnezzar's throne in Babylon.


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