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The impact of ICT on tertiary education: advances and promises by Kurt Larsen and Stéphan Vincent-Lancrin Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

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Presentation on theme: "The impact of ICT on tertiary education: advances and promises by Kurt Larsen and Stéphan Vincent-Lancrin Centre for Educational Research and Innovation."— Presentation transcript:

1 The impact of ICT on tertiary education: advances and promises by Kurt Larsen and Stéphan Vincent-Lancrin Centre for Educational Research and Innovation OECD Conference on “Advancing Knowledge and the knowledge economy” National Academies January 2005

2 Outline: 1.The promises of e-learning in tertiary education: access, quality and costs; 2.Comparison between promises and achievements: access, quality and costs 3.The challenges for further development of e-learning: What sustainable innovation models?

3 The promises e-learning in tertiary education: access, quality and cost Characteristics of the education sector: Weak educational R&D Learning by doing – craft innovation Difficult to carry out experimentations Little codification of knowledge of how to teach Access: Help to meet the huge demand for flexible lifelong learning. Quality: Increased flexibility and learner-centred, innovation Cost-efficient: reaching new students, replacing “brick and mortar” campuses

4 U.S. Sloan Foundation survey Over 1.6 million students took at least one on-line course Fall 2002 (11% of all students). One-third of these students ( ) took all of their courses on-line (4% of all students). Expected growth in on-line students : 20%. Fully online e-learning is only a few percent. Comparison between promises and achievements: access Conclusion: E-Learning lives up to its promises in terms of access – mix-modes learning models the way forward

5 Positive impact of mix-modes: Flexible access to learning and research material Enhancement of face-to-face lectures and seminars Improved communication between students and faculty Facilitated access to international faculty/peers Comparison between promises and achievements: quality Conclusion: No radical transformation of teaching and learning. The jury is out concerning quality of fully on- line learning

6 No radical savings rather add-on costs: Virtual universities have not replaced campus universities Digital libraries have supplemented rather than replaced physical ones Very little codification and standardisation of teaching: not fewer academics teaching E-learning can be cost-efficient: dependent on the business-model, the profile and number of students, topic taught, initial costs etc. Comparison between promises and achievements: costs Conclusion: Little evidence that e-learning has led to more cost-efficiency. Numerous failures.

7 1)Enhancement of traditional course/program configurations 2)Use of course management systems 3)Imported course objects (learning objects) 4)New course/program configurations (faculty and students to adopt new roles) Conclusion: Most tertiary education institutions are embracing adoption cycles one and/or two. Few are experiencing with three and four Conclusion: The four e-learning adoption cycles for tertiary education

8 Challenges and future directions for e-learning: What sustainable innovation models? Engaging faculty, students and universities Like in other sectors, the cost-efficiency depends on new organisational and knowledge management practices 3 rd and 4 th cycle will require more collaborative way of producing teaching material It might prove more difficult to provide the “softer” social, organisational and legal changes than providing the technological infrastructures

9 Challenges and future directions for e-learning: What sustainable innovation models? A possible way forward: Open Educational Resources 1)Open courseware ( e.g. MIT project) 2)Open software tools (e.g. Sakai project) 3)Open material for capacity building of faculty staff ( e.g. e- sponsored by Bertelsmann Foundation) 4)Repositories of learning objects (e.g. MERLOT)

10 Challenges and future directions for e-learning: What sustainable innovation models? A possible way forward: Open Educational Resources Open Educational Resources (OER) “communities” – innovation through knowledge sharing Need for establishing review process or quality assessment of OER Need to better understand the users of OER Copyright issues (i.e. Creative Commons project)

11 E-learning is growing at a rapid pace and has enhanced teaching and learning E-learning innovation is likely to change on-campus learning - the impact of change will depend on “softer” social, organisational and legal changes Proprietary and Open strategies will “live” side by side Mixed-modes delivery will dominate Evolutionary rather than revolutionary innovation and change The future of e-learning in tertiary education: Conclusions


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