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Developing, planning and assessing a mastery curriculum Debbie Morgan Director for Primary Mathematics Hampshire.

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Presentation on theme: "Developing, planning and assessing a mastery curriculum Debbie Morgan Director for Primary Mathematics Hampshire."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing, planning and assessing a mastery curriculum Debbie Morgan Director for Primary Mathematics Hampshire

2 How Maths leaders and teachers approach: Curriculum planning to support a mastery curriculum Assessing a mastery curriculum and evidencing progress – assessment without levels Developing deep learning which supports sustainable progress

3 The New Curriculum 3 Factual & Procedural Fluency Conceptual Understanding INTEGRATION

4 Features of Mastery 4 Curriculum designLonger units of work, prioritising key topics Lesson designCarefully structured lesson to develop the detail and depth Pupil supportQuick intervention Teaching resourcesCarefully chosen examples and activities. Application of variation theory. Effective use of representations Teaching methods differentiation Keeping the class together and aiming for depth Productivity and practiceIntelligent practice

5 Mastery All/most pupils can and will achieve Development of deep structural knowledge Carefully chosen examples supporting the opportunity to make connections Keeping the class working together Longer time on key topics

6 The New Curriculum sets higher expectations for pupil achievement and the expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. (National Curriculum page 3). 6

7 Developing depth through representations

8 x = 6 15

9 The National Curriculum 2014 “Just getting the right answer in math class isn’t enough if students don’t know why the answer is the right one.” The National Curriculum is seeking to develop deep sustainable learning in line with successful countries. 9

10 0.62 × × 0.38 Thinking masterfully

11 Take a brown, green and yellow Making Connections What relationships can you express?

12

13 Drawing attention to structure in KS1 13 Making Comparisons

14 Practice Makes Perfect Intelligent Practice In designing [these] exercises, the teacher is advised to avoid mechanical repetition and to create an appropriate path for practising the thinking process with increasing creativity. Gu, 1991

15 Carefully Chosen Examples What is but also what isn’t : teachers predict likely misconceptions, and teach explicitly to raise, address and resolve them.

16 Planning Spend longer time on topics Prioritise key topics Focus on relationships Make Connections Ensure intelligent practice 16

17 Curriculum Planning What areas should we prioritise? Number and Place Value Addition and Subtraction Multiplication and Division Fractions and ratio Measurement Geometry Statistics Algebra 17

18 The School Curriculum Schools have the flexibility to introduce content earlier or later within a key stage. Schools are required to set out their school curriculum for mathematics on a year-by- year basis and make this information available online. 18

19 The New Curriculum needs a New form of Assessment The research for the review of the National Curriculum showed that it should focus on ‘fewer things in greater depth’, in secure learning which persists, rather than relentless, “over-rapid progression” Depth and sustainability is what assessment should focus on (Living in a Levels-Free World, by Tim Oates published by DfE)

20 Fewer Things Greater Depth Class working together Longer time on topics Together these reflect the features of A Mastery Curriculum for Mathematics 20 How does this impact on assessment?

21 What might assessment look like and how do we track progress? Stage 1- is developing (has some knowledge and understanding) Stage 2 - has secure depth (is able to reason and apply the mathematics with some fluency In familiar contexts ) Stage 3 - has greater depth (is able to reason and make connections to other areas of mathematics and has the insight, fluency and flexibility to apply the mathematics creatively to unfamiliar contexts and problems. 21

22 What does Ofsted say? Pupils’ strengths and misconceptions are identified and acted on by teachers during lessons, and more widely, to: plan future lessons and teaching remedy where pupils do not demonstrate knowledge or understanding of a key element of the curriculum deepen the knowledge and understanding of the most able. 22

23 Inspecting the teaching of mathematics uses resources and approaches to enable pupils in the class to understand and master the mathematics they are learning. The national curriculum for mathematics specifies the aims and then states, ’The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at the same pace.’ develops depth of understanding and readiness for the next stage. The national curriculum states, ‘Decisions about when to progress should always be based on the security of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. The national curriculum for mathematicsnational curriculum for mathematics 23

24 All pupils become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately., reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language., and can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions. The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. However, decisions about when to progress should always be based on the security of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. Pupils who grasp concepts rapidly should be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any acceleration through new content. Those who are not sufficiently fluent should consolidate their understanding, including through additional practice, before moving on. Sounds familiar? Teaching the new NC = Teaching for Mastery


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