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ANNUAL REPORT 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION Pg. 2-4 PRESIDENT'S REPORT Pg. 5 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT Pg. 5 2012 PROGRAM STATISTIC.

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Presentation on theme: "ANNUAL REPORT 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION Pg. 2-4 PRESIDENT'S REPORT Pg. 5 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT Pg. 5 2012 PROGRAM STATISTIC."— Presentation transcript:

1 ANNUAL REPORT 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION Pg. 2-4 PRESIDENT'S REPORT Pg. 5 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT Pg PROGRAM STATISTIC Pg. 6-11

2 ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION 2012/13 MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Delbert Lubeck President Connie Korpan Vice-President J. Dennis Fitzgerad Treasurer Henriette Romancewicz Secretary Bill Walker Director Scott Hagarty Director Margaret Hammon Director Dwight Logan Director Gail Haakstad Director Judith Hall Director 2012/13 PACE STAFF Jacquie Aitken-Kish Executive Director Present Connie Miller Therapist, Assistant Director & Genesis Program Coordinator 1992 – Present Ali Al-Asadi Clinical Supervisor 1989 – Present 2

3 2012 VOLUNTEER INFORMATION VOLUNTEERS HOURS Board Members Wilderness Adventure Rally CISM Breakfast with the Boys 6 30 Bingos TOTAL

4 In 2012 Pace provided: therapy to 346 individuals, family support and youth work to 236 children and 179 parents, coordinated crisis intervention, critical response services and support services following traumatic events to 429 individuals, group support to 79 individuals, and training to 2916 students and community caregivers. Every year as I compile these numbers I am amazed at the number of people supported through our services. There is an apparent trend in the cases we see today. The cases we see today are more complex and involve more violence. It seems that highly sexualized behavior which would have been considered unusual 10 to 15 years ago is now common and needs to be cautiously and thoroughly assessed based on the child’s access to the internet and other age inappropriate material. While the internet is also an additional forum for offenders to access victims, the number of offenders known to the child through direct relationships is still much greater than that through the internet. We have accomplished many things in 2012 including accreditation. I need to thank all who participated in this process. Although the process added much stress, I believe it helped firm up the viability and the consistency of our services. The demand for our services continues to remain high as communities in our region respond to the prevalence of sexual abuse. Research is finally confirming our long time awareness that child sexual abuse and trauma needs to be addressed to prevent addiction, suicide, further violence in relationships, and emotional and physical health concerns. Trauma informed practice is the new term for the work we have understood and practiced for 30 years. Pace’s ability to provide this level of support and therapy is only possible because of fabulous volunteers and staff; community support and the support of funders; the years of experience of frontline staff; and our ability to invite bright new social workers and psychologists to practice with us. I thank everyone involved in our organization for your openness, commitment, and abilities. You have allowed us to grow and provide to our clients more and more services. Sincerely Jacquie Aitken Kish I would like to thank everyone involved in Pace in We had a good year thanks to the efforts of staff, volunteers and funders. While funding is always a concern in the not for profit sector, we are relatively stable and thus are able to focus on what we do best; helping people in our region. This past year Pace received an Inspiration Award from the Minister of Human Services. The award was for Leadership in Family Violence Prevention. This was indeed an honor and something for Pace to be proud of. Another highlight of the past year was the opening of the Caribou Center. This project was started earlier and after a lot of hard work by everyone involved it is now up and running and doing fabulous work. We received a letter from the mother of a client and she was wowed by the service her child received from the Caribou Center, so hats off to Jamie and everyone else involved in running the center. It is great to have a resource of this caliber in our region and it will help children for years to come. As we move forward, no matter what happens and no matter what challenges we face, we can be proud that we are making a difference in people’s lives in our community. As always, I am extremely proud as well to be associated with such a great organization and especially the people who make it that way. Let’s have a great Again, Thank You. Delbert Lubeck President’s Report Executive Director’s Report 4

5 Genesis/Community Program # OF CLIENTS # OF HRS COURT PREP # OF HRS COURT ACCOMP COURT PREP 2009 Participants 2009 # of Sessions 2010 Participants 2010 # of Sessions 2011 Participants 2011 # of Se ssions 2012 Participants 201 # of Sessions Female Survivors of Sexual Abuse hrs 37 Male Survivors of Sexual Abuse Spouse/ Family Member of Survivor Crisis Interventions hrs TOTAL hrs INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS: GROUPSPARTICIPANTS female 2 male INTAKE GROUPS EMPOWERMENT GROUP GRANDE PRAIRIE February 13, 2012 – April 16, Female Participants SELF ESTEEM GROUP PEACE RIVER Nov 29, 2011 – May 8, Female Participants Nov 20, 2012 – January 22, Female Participants GROUPSPARTICIPANTS male 37 female male 21 female male 29 female male 24 female male 14 female male 14 female 28 AADAC GROUPS 5

6 CHILD ABUSE TREATMENT PROGRAM 2009 Male2009 Female 2010 Male2010 Female 2011 Male2011 Female 2012 Male2012 Female Intra-Familial Sexual Child & Adolescent Victims 1i Non-Offending Parents 2i Adult Sex Offender 3i Child and Adolescent Sex Offender 4i Non-Abused Siblings 5i Parents of Child & Adol. Offenders 6i Relative of an Abused Victim 7i Foster Parent of a Victim 8i Sub Total Extra-Familial Sexual Child & Adolescent Victims 1x Non-Offending Parents 2x Adult Sex Offender 3x Child and Adolescent Sex Offender 4x Non-Abused Siblings 5x Parents of Child & Adolescent Offend 6x Relative of an Abused Victim 7x Foster Parent of a Victim 8x Sub Total Physical Abuse Victims of Physical Abuse 1p Parents of Victims of Physical Abuse 2p Offenders of Physical Abuse 3p Child & adolescent Physical Offender 4p Non-Abused Siblings 5p Foster Parent of a Victim 8p Sub Total Other Children demonstrating symptoms of victimization with no sexual disclosure Those not fitting above criteria 11 (Family violence) Sub Total Total Young Offender Center Total LOCATION Jasper Ski/Snowboard Trip Aboriginal – Peace River Paddle/Water Safety Training Churchill River Canoe Trip Kettle Valley Railway Cycle Trip Wilderness Wilderness Backpack Trip Fall Follow Up Program TOTALS PEACE COUNTRY WILDERNESS PROGRAM TOTAL PARTICIPANTS = 49 6

7 School PresentationsChildrenAdultsPresentations “Who Do You Tell?”™ K (2/class) “Who Do You Tell?” (1/class) “WDYT?”™ Staff Information 0825 “WDYT?”™ Parent Information TOTALS TOTALS TOTALS TOTALS TOTALS Public Education Program Statistics: 2012 Community PresentationsParticipantsPresentations 2012 TOTALS TOTALS TOTALS TOTALS TOTALS23913 PACE Professional Training SeriesParticipantsSessionsInstruction Hours Professional Boundaries1826 ASIST (Suicide Prevention)31342 Children and Trauma2939 Children who Witness Fam. Viol2939 Family Viol/Offender Issues18212 Crisis Intervention/Comm. Skills33327 Cross Cultural Awareness Eating Disorders183 Grief and Loss1726 Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) First Responders to SA/SA TOTALS TOTALS TOTALS HRS 2009 TOTALS HRS 2008 TOTALS HRS participants 223 presentations 7

8 P 2003* # of Children # of Parents # of Families # of Individuals CUMULATIVE PROGRAM STATISTICS (Children and families may be served in more than one Program) *2003 amended to include High Level 2003* # of Children # of Parents # of Families FAMILY SUPPORT 2003* # of Children # of Parents # of Families YOUTH WORK 2003* # of Children # of Parents # of Families SUPERVISED VISITS 2003* # of Children # of Parents # of Families DROP INS Family Support Program

9 Group Participants: 27 Group Participants: 15 Group Participants: 27 Group Participants: 48 Group Participants: 53 Groups Facilitated: 44 Groups Facilitated: 44 Groups Facilitated: 43 Groups F acilitated: 49 Groups Facilitated: 51 Average Participation: 3.45 Members Range Average Participants: 1.3 members Range 0 – 6 Average Participants: 1 member Range Average Participants: 5.33 member Range Average Participants: 7.04 member Range Topics: Self Esteem Parenting Battering Relationships Boundaries Mental Health Issues Anxiety/Depression Change Anger Management Topics: Self Esteem Parenting Loss Battering Relationships Anxiety/Depression Topics: Self Esteem Goal Setting Parenting Relationships Depression Topics: Abusive Relationships Parenting Stress Coping Skills Anxiety Forgiveness Self Care Boundaries Emotions Anger Identity Gratitude Belief Systems Changing Thoughts Hope Grief & Loss Self-Esteem Values Topics: Relationships Parenting Stress Coping Skills Forgiveness Self Care Boundaries Anger/Fear Change/Hope Self-Esteem Letting Go Goal Setting Triggers Expectations Judgment Safety Trauma Shame Regrets Domestic Violence Spirituality Women’s Support Group CRITICAL INCIDENT RESPONSE TEAM TEAM LEADER / PEER SUPPORT (*#) indicates PACE only responses 9 # of Responses# of Participants (*7) 29(*241) (*8) 11(*78) (*10) 16(*35)

10 SAFE VISITATION PROGRAM S THE SAFE VISITATION PROGRAM January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 The Safe Visitation Program continues to receive referrals from our community. The majority of our referrals have come from the Justice System (courts). The program scheduled 408 visits. Of these 408 visits the families cancelled a total of 115 visits. Most of the cancellations are noted as work related, and others were due to the children being ill. This year we accommodated 290 visits, some were an hour and a half in length and others were two hours in length. We also had a few that were court ordered to be three hours in length. The total client hours for these visits are 873 hours. MONITORED EXCHANGE PROGRAM The number of monitored exchanges this last year; have increased. We have had 10 families use this program; those families have 9 children between them. This last year from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 we have monitored 171 exchanges. CARING DADS During 2012 we ran our first Caring Dads group. This group is 17 weeks in length; we had 6 men complete the group. Between these fathers they have access to 17 children, from the ages of 15 months to 15 years of age. This fall we also had a new staff member join our Safe Visitation and Monitored Exchange program. Bernice Shadow, Bernice will be covering Friday evening for the monitored Exchange program and Saturday and Sunday in our Safe Visitation program. Regards, Marlene, Safe Visitation Coordinator 10

11 YEAR# OF DRIVES , Crooked CreekMorgan’s Mountain Clairmont David Thompson Bible Camp ValleyviewSturgeon Lake DimsdaleHeart ValleyWanham ElmsworthHigh PrairieKadote Lake FairviewPeroriaKinuso Grande CacheRycroftBeaverlodge GoodfareWembleySpirit River Grande PrairieSexsmithPeace River HytheSlave LakeRidgevalley Dunvegan Prov. ParkSunset HouseTeepee Creek Edmonton DRIVE PROGRAM Drive Destinations 2012: 11


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