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WELCOME DQ5: ENGAGING STUDENTS  Please sign in and collect materials. (Choose 3 colored sheets of paper.)  Sit 3 to a table.  Fold all three colored.

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Presentation on theme: "WELCOME DQ5: ENGAGING STUDENTS  Please sign in and collect materials. (Choose 3 colored sheets of paper.)  Sit 3 to a table.  Fold all three colored."— Presentation transcript:

1 WELCOME DQ5: ENGAGING STUDENTS  Please sign in and collect materials. (Choose 3 colored sheets of paper.)  Sit 3 to a table.  Fold all three colored sheets of paper in half hamburger style. (Do NOT tear.)  Complete the bell work activity provided at your table on a half sheet of colored paper. BEV PERRAULT DONNA HUNZIKER

2 WELCOME DQ5: ENGAGING STUDENTS Please sit 3 to a table and complete your Bell Work Activity

3 Wow! 4 Minutes My students were really engaged in this lesson!  Fold your colored sheet of paper in half. (Do NOT tear.)  On a half sheet, write about a time when your students were highly engaged in learning.  Underline or highlight the elements of the lesson and environment that resulted in this high level of engagement.

4 GROUP NORMS  A re Respectful of Other’s Opinions and Listen with an Open Mind; Limit the Use of Electronics for Checking s to Breaks; Focus on Instructional Model and not Evaluation Process  C ollaborate in Group Work  T ake Responsibility for Engaging in Learning and Continuous Growth It’s Okay to have Fun! Suffering is Optional.

5 Resources on Web page  Select Instructional Model and Evaluation under Departments.  PowerPoint Presentations, along with district PD schedule, are found under the Learning Opportunities tab.  Additional information may be found under the Teacher Resources tab.  You are welcome use an electronic device to open this presentation from our webpage.

6 GOAL The participant will be able to use strategies to effectively engage students in learning.

7  Fold three sheets of colored paper in half hamburger style.  Select two sheets and along the fold, cut one inch from the top and the bottom.  Third Sheet: From one inch in from top and bottom, cut along the fold. (Do not cut to the edges.)  Thread the first set of two sheets through the center cut of the third sheet.

8 DESIGN QUESTION 5 WHAT WILL I DO TO HELP ENGAGE STUDENTS? Label the cover of your academic journal: Label the back of your academic journal: RESOURCES

9

10 “Researchers agree that engaged students learn more, retain more, and enjoy learning activities more than students who are not engaged.” -Elizabeth R. Bowen, “Student Engagement and Its Relation to Quality Work Design: A Review of the Literature”

11 Questions of Engagement  How do I feel?  Am I interested?  Is this important?  Can I do this? - Marzano

12 Table Discussion  In your journal, create a graphic organizer about your engaging lesson. (3 minutes)  Identify the elements and environment that increased engagement.  Share your graphic organizer at your table. (1 minute each person)

13 31. Providing Opportunities for Students to Appropriately Talk about Themselves The teacher provides students with opportunities to relate what is being addressed in class to their personal interests Teacher Evidence  Teacher is aware of student interests and makes connections between these interests and class content  Teacher structures activities that ask students to make connections between the content and their personal interests  When students are explaining how content relates to their personal interests, the teacher appears encouraging and interested

14 31. Providing Opportunities for Students to Appropriately Talk about Themselves The teacher provides students with opportunities to relate what is being addressed in class to their personal interests Student Evidence  Students engage in activities that require them to make connections between their personal interests and the content  When asked, students explain how making connections between content and their personal interests engages them and helps them better understand the content

15 Self-motivation  Comes from a desire to achieve understanding for the enjoyment of learning or to accomplish a personal goal, rather than for a reward or incentive  Intrinsically motivated students tend to access more of their previous learning and creativity in new learning experiences  Extrinsically motivated students tend to retain less and show a weaker commitment to learning -Elizabeth R. Bowen, “Student Engagement and Its Relation to Quality Work Design: A Review of the Literature”

16 Students are motivated to engage when… Motivation See Value in the Learning Can make an Emotional/Personal Link to the Content/Process (Relate to Prior Knowledge/Experiences) Believe They Can Learn It

17 Understanding Engagement is not… Nuclear physics! Rocket science!

18 But it is critical to learning… following are some basic concepts!

19 29. Demonstrating Intensity and Enthusiasm The teacher demonstrates intensity and enthusiasm for the content in a variety of ways. Teacher Evidence  Teacher describes personal experiences that relate to the content  Teacher signals excitement for content by:  Physical gestures  Voice tone  Dramatization of information  Teacher overtly adjusts energy level https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/b est-teaching- advice?utm_source=Alpha+List&utm_camp aign=239a89574d- Newsletter_December_8_2012&utm_medium =

20 29. Demonstrating Intensity and Enthusiasm The teacher demonstrates intensity and enthusiasm for the content in a variety of ways. Student Evidence  When asked, students say that the teacher “likes the content” and “likes teaching”  Students’ attention levels increase when the teacher demonstrates enthusiasm and intensity for the content

21 Teacher Passion  https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos /best-teaching- advice?utm_source=Alpha+List&utm_ca mpaign=239a89574d- Newsletter_December_8_2012&utm_medi um= https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos /best-teaching- advice?utm_source=Alpha+List&utm_ca mpaign=239a89574d- Newsletter_December_8_2012&utm_medi um=

22 36. Acknowledging Students’ Interests and Backgrounds The teacher uses students’ interests and background to produce a climate of acceptance and community Teacher Evidence  Teacher has side discussions with students about events in their lives  Teacher has discussions with students about topics in which they are interested  Teacher builds student interests into lessons Student Evidence  When asked, students describe the teacher as someone who knows them and/or is interested in them  Students respond when teacher demonstrates understanding of their interests and background  When asked students say they feel accepted

23 Learning Relationships “Students show increased effort in classroom activities when teachers take an interest in students as individuals, get to know them by name, and talk to them not only in the classroom but during other activities in the school as well.” -Dr. Richard Jones, “Strengthening Student Engagement,” 2008

24 32. Presenting Unusual or Intriguing Information The teacher uses unusual or intriguing information about the content in a manner that enhances student engagement. Teacher Evidence  Teacher systematically provides interesting facts and details about the content  Teacher encourages students to identify interesting information about the content  Teacher engages students in activities like “Believe it or not” about the content  Teacher uses guest speakers to provide unusual information about the content

25 32. Presenting Unusual or Intriguing Information The teacher uses unusual or intriguing information about the content in a manner that enhances student engagement. Student Evidence  Students’ attention increases when unusual information is presented about the content  When asked, students explain how the unusual information makes them more interested in the content

26 Intriguing Picture Activity  On a page in your academic journal, label your sheet with the following underlined words/phrases: 1) What facts & details do I notice? 2) 5 Senses: What do I taste, hear, see, touch, smell? 3) What questions/ideas do I have when I view this picture? 4) Class Application: How can I use this type of activity with my students?

27 While viewing the photograph, complete each section of your graphic organizer. Photograph used with permission. – Daniela White Images

28  1 st participant shares a single fact or detail from section 1.  Rotate clockwise for each participant to share a single fact or detail from section 1, not shared by another team member.  Participants may add to graphic organizers as the team shares.  Repeat for Sections 2-4. (Share only one item from each section.)

29 Share your ideas and borrow someone's ideas! Photograph used with permission. – Daniela White Images

30 Student Feedback: What kind of work do you find engaging? What kind of work do you hate?  Students stated that the most engaging work “allowed for creativity, sparked curiosity, provided an opportunity to work with others, and provided a feeling of success.”  Students responded that they hated work that was “repetitive, required no thought, or was forced upon them.” -Elizabeth R. Bowen, “Student Engagement and Its Relation to Quality Work Design: A Review of the Literature”

31 Working on the Work  Schlechty is credited with the “Working on the Work” theory.  When teachers work on the quality of the work, student engagement will increase.  Increased engagement will result in increased academic performance as students work harder to achieve desired results.  This is known as the “WOW” framework -Elizabeth R. Bowen, “Student Engagement and Its Relation to Quality Work Design: A Review of the Literature”

32 Read & Reflect Response Cards  Number your whiteboard 1-4.  Read “Schlechty Center on Engagement.”  Whoever has the red plate, draw a question card; read the question aloud and think about your answer. Verbally answer the question using evidence from the text. Participants with blue plates should agree, add on, or disagree and tell why.  Every participant records answer on plate. (both red & blue plates)  Rotate plates clockwise one person.  Repeat. Activity

33 “I need to get at least 92% on this assignment to get straight A’s this semester. Then my GPA will be & I’ll be in the top 10 of my graduating class.” This is an example of A.Cognitive Engagement B.Strategic Compliance C.Ritual Compliance D.Rebellion Explain using evidence from the text.

34 What distinguishes strategic compliance from ritual compliance? Explain using evidence from the text.

35 What is the impact to learning when a student is cognitively engaged rather than compliant? Explain using evidence from the text.

36 How might you move a student from Retreatism to Cognitively Engaged? Explain using evidence from the text.

37 Schlechty “The tasks students are assigned and the activities students are encouraged to undertake are clearly linked in the minds of the teacher and the students to problems, issues, products, performances, and exhibitions about which the students care and upon which students place value.” -Schlechty, Shaking Up the Schoolhouse 2001, p. 113

38 In your academic journal, write about student engagement reflecting on what you learned from the Schlechty Article. Add notes on how you might use the “Read & Reflect Response Cards” activity and white boards (plastic plates) in your classroom.

39 Teacher Actions “Teachers can foster an environment conducive to student engagement by practicing small, seemingly unimportant activities: greeting students at the door, making eye contact, allowing enough “wait” time when expecting a student to answer a question before moving on to another student, dignifying wrong responses, repeating a question, or giving hints that will encourage students to try again.” -Marzano, A Different Kind of Classroom, 1992

40 Managing Response Rates  Participants leave their “home” group and meet in “expert” groups.  Read, Discuss & Plan – 20 minutes Individually read provided article. Expert groups discuss the content and plan how to present the information to the whole group.  Presentation – 5 minutes or less each Each Expert Group will present examples of the assigned questioning techniques.

41 Group Presentations  During each presentation record information about Managing Response Rates in your academic. Include note on how you might use these strategies with your students.

42 26. Managing Response Rates The teacher uses response rate techniques to maintain student engagement in questions. Teacher Evidence  Teacher uses wait time  Teacher uses response cards  Teacher has students use hand signals to respond to questions  Teacher uses choral response  Teacher uses technology to keep track of students’ responses  Teacher uses response chaining Student Evidence  Multiple students or the entire class responds to questions posed by the teacher  When asked, students can describe their thinking about specific questions posed by the teacher

43 27. Using Physical Movement The teacher uses physical movement to maintain student engagement. Teacher Evidence  Teacher has students stand up and stretch or related activities when their energy is low  Teacher uses activities that require students to physically move to respond do questions  Vote with your feet  Go to the part of the room that represents the answer you agree with  Teacher has students physically act out or model content to increase energy and engagement  Teacher use give-one-get one activities that require students to move about the room

44 27. Using Physical Movement The teacher uses physical movement to maintain student engagement. Student Evidence  Students engage in the physical activities designed by the teacher  When asked, students can explain how the physical movement keeps their interest and helps them learn

45 24. Noticing & Reacting When Students are Not Engaged The teacher scans the room making note of when students are not engaged and takes overt action. Teacher Evidence  Teacher notices when specific students or groups of students are not engaged  Teacher notices when the energy level in the room is low  Teacher takes action to re-engage students Student Evidence  Students appear aware of the fact that the teacher is taking note of their level of engagement  Students try to increase their level of engagement when prompted  When asked, students explain that the teacher expects high levels of engagement

46 25. Using Academic Games The teacher uses academic games and inconsequential competition to maintain student engagement. Teacher Evidence  Teacher uses structured games such as Jeopardy!, family feud, and the like  Teacher develops impromptu games such as making a game out of which answer might be correct for a given question  Teacher uses friendly competition along with classroom games Student Evidence  Students engage in the games with some enthusiasm  When asked, students can explain how the games keep their interest and help them learn or remember content

47 Talk a Mile a Minute Game  Project a subject with a list of related vocabulary.  Participants are in pairs. Participant A will face the screen and Participant B will have his/her back to the screen.  While facing the screen, Participant A describe each word on the list by giving clues. Clues may not include any of the words or the subject.  Participant B will guess individual vocabulary words and will name the general subject.  Vocabulary may be skipped and returned to later.  We need two volunteers to model this game. Modeling the Game

48 Subject: Types of Animals Mammal Reptile Amphibian Bird Insect Fish Spider

49 Round 1 Partner A faces screen & gives clues. Partner B has back to screen and responds to clues. You have 15 seconds to find a partner who is not at your table. Partner A is closest to the ceiling!

50 Subject: Abraham Lincoln Civil War President Emancipation Proclamation Gettysburg Address Assassination John Wilkes Booth Ford’s Theater

51 Round 2 – Exchange Roles Partner B faces screen & gives clues. Partner A has back to screen and responds to clues. (Partner A is closest to the ceiling!)

52 Subject: Engaging Students Noticing and Reacting When Students are Not Engaged Using Academic Games Managing Response Rates Using Physical Movement Maintaining a Lively Pace Demonstrating Intensity and Enthusiasm Presenting Unusual or Intriguing Information

53 Classroom Application  Return to your tables.  Discuss how you can use the “Talk a Mile a Minute” game in your classroom? – 3 minutes  Reflect in your Journal. – 2 min.

54 28. Maintaining a Lively Pace The teacher uses pacing techniques to maintain students’ engagement. Teacher Evidence  Teacher employs crisp transitions from one activity to another  Teacher alters pace appropriately (i.e. speeds up and slows down) Student Evidence  Students quickly adapt to transitions and re-engage when a new activity is begun  When asked about the pace of the class, students describe it as not too fast or not too slow

55 30. Using Friendly Controversy Among Students (team talk)* The teacher uses friendly controversy techniques to maintain student engagement. Teacher Evidence  Teacher structures mini-debates about the content  Teacher has students examine multiple perspectives and opinions about the content  Teacher elicits different opinions on content from members of the class

56 30. Using Friendly Controversy Among Students (team talk)* The teacher uses friendly controversy techniques to maintain student engagement. Student Evidence  Students engage in friendly controversy activities with enhanced engagement  When asked, students describe friendly controversy activities as “stimulating,” “fun,” and so on  When asked, students explain how a friendly controversy activity helped them better understand the content

57 In which instructional method is cognitive engagement the highest? Instructional Method  Laboratory (Hands-on work)  Group work  Presentation (creating/making)  Individualized (seat) work  Class discussions (whole group T-led)  Teacher lecture Engagement Rank Passive for all Active for all Is the Learning Active/Passive? Sources: Yair, Educational Administration Quarterly, Vol. 36, #4 (October 2000); Valentine (NSDC Conference (December, 2010) Active for all Passive for all 5 Passive for most

58 Engagement and Instructional Methods  When compared to teacher lecture learning experiences, the odds that students will be cognitively engaged are:  125% higher during group learning experiences  115% higher during a laboratory learning experiences  90% higher during class presentation learning experiences  70% higher during individualized learning experiences Source: Yair, Educational Administration Quarterly, Vol. 36, #4 (October 2000)

59 Classroom Application  Reflect in your Journal on what elements create cognitive engaging activities. – 3 minutes  Identify one strategy that you will implement in the next week.

60 Take responsibility for student engagement practices. “It is primarily the teacher’s responsibility to engage the students, as opposed to the teacher expecting students to come to class naturally and automatically engaged.” -Dr. Richard Jones, “Strengthening Student Engagement,” 2008

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