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A Conceptual Model to Adjust Fugitive Dust Emissions to Account for Near Source Dust Removal in Grid Model Applications Thompson G. Pace US EPA Presented.

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Presentation on theme: "A Conceptual Model to Adjust Fugitive Dust Emissions to Account for Near Source Dust Removal in Grid Model Applications Thompson G. Pace US EPA Presented."— Presentation transcript:

1 A Conceptual Model to Adjust Fugitive Dust Emissions to Account for Near Source Dust Removal in Grid Model Applications Thompson G. Pace US EPA Presented to Joint Meeting of WRAP Emissions & Fugitive Dust Forums Las Vegas, NV October 29, 2003

2 Background AQ Models overestimate the amount of crustal material found on ambient samples 2001 PM2.5 EI (TPY)  Crustal Material ~ 2M TPY  Total Carbon ~ 2M TPY Mid ’90s (EPA)  Temporary Adjustment (Divide–by–4)  Began to look for answers

3 Searching for Reasons & Solutions DRI / EPA Workshop (late 90’s)  75% of source plume < 2m agl at 5 to 10 m from source  Low plume subject to removal by: Capture -- Impaction, filtration on nearby vegetation & structures (CF); Other deposition-enhancing mechanisms near the surface  Turbulence, agglomeration-enhanced settling  “Transportable Fraction (TF)” ~ portion NOT removed locally through capture or enhanced deposition EPA’s “Divide-by-4” ~ 1 st order approximation WRAP Expert Panel (2001)  Supported & strengthened DRI / EPA assessment  Called for field studies to quantify removal

4 Surface Cover (Vegetation & Structures) Role in FD Removal Early work by AQ Modelers  Flow over a canopy ~ Slinn  Stilling Zone – Lower 3/4 of canopy Windbreaks – wind erosion “staple”  Traditionally to slow wind on leeward side  Research by Raupach Entrapment effects Dust transmittance through a windbreak is close to the optical transmittance  Capture varies with type & density of surface cover

5 Transportable Fraction ~Terminology~ Capture Fraction (CF) Portion of Fugitive Dust (FD) Emissions removed by nearby surface cover Enhanced Deposition Fraction (EDF) Transportable Emissions (TE) = FD Emissions – (Captured Emissions, Enhanced Deposition) = FD Emissions – FDE*CF – [FDE – (FDE*CF)] *EDF Transportable Fraction (TF) = TE / FD Emissions

6 Conceptual Model Capture Fraction vs Surface Cover

7 Estimates of CF for Specific Surface Conditions Surface Cover Type CF (Estimated) Smooth, Barren or Water0.03 – 0.1 Agricultural Grasses Scrub and Sparsely Wooded Urban Forested

8 Comparison of Test Data with CF Conceptual Model

9 Example TF’s for Counties in NV & GA Note: In this example, TF includes CF effects only. [ It sets EDF = 0] Land Use Type Barren &Water AgriculturalGrassUrbanScrub & Sparse Vegetation Forested TF Fractional Land Use Churchill Co NV Fractional Land Use Oglethorpe Co GA TF (for County) = ∑ TF (Land Use Types) * County Fractional Land Use (Land Use Types)

10 Transport Fraction (CF only) by County

11 Modeling Issues Gaussian Models  Have many CF & ED removal mechanisms built-in rarely utilized  Application requires empirical coefficients ~ limited data & guidance Grid Models  Remix particles w/in lowest layer at each time step (underestimates removal by gravitational settling)  Ignore removal processes in initial grid Very important UNLESS grid is VERY small

12 Comments on Use of the TF in Modeling Applications Gaussian Models  Not recommended – use features of model properly, instead Grid Models  TF concept can be used with proper caveats  Remember, there ARE other issues with the inventory – the TF concept should NOT be expected to fully account for overestimation of crustal fraction of ambient measurements. TF concept is evolving Model modifications could (over time) eliminate need for TF concept

13 Research Needs Improvements Needed:  Emission factors & algorithms  Source activity data Understand physics of vegetative capture and enhanced deposition  Enable improved estimates of CF & EDF Specialized input parameters for models to help account for near source removal  Develop, test  Prepare guidance on their use

14 Conclusions TF concept does provide a useful way to account for near source removal when used with Grid Models This area of research offers many opportunities to improve model performance There is much work to do to refine the concept

15 References Pace, Thompson G. “A Conceptual Model to Adjust Fugitive Dust Emissions to Account for Near Source Particle Removal in Grid Model Applications”, NARSTO Emissions Conference, Austin TX, October, Watson, John G., Judy Chow and contributors ( 2000). Reconciling Urban Fugitive Dust Emissions Inventory and Ambient Source Contribution Estimates. Desert Research Institute Report F Prepared for U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC. May Countess, Richard, W. Barnard, C. Claiborn, D. Gillette, D. Latimer, T. Pace, J Watson, “Methodology for Estimating Fugitive Windblown and Mechanically Resuspended Road Dust Emissions Applicable for Regional Air Quality Modeling”, EPA Emissions Inventory Conference, Denver CO Slinn, W.G.N (1982). “Predictions for Particle Depositions to Vegetative Canopies”, Atmospheric Environment, 16: Cionco, Ronald, Army Research Lab, Personal Communication to T. G. Pace, June 25, 2002 Raupach, M.R., Woods, N., Dorr, G., Leys, J.F. and Cleugh, H.A. (2001). The entrapment of particles by windbreaks. Atmospheric Environment 35,

16 References Raupach, M.R., and F.L. Leys (1999). “The efficacy of Vegetation in Limiting Spray Drift and Dust Movement Prepared for Dept of Land and Water Conservation, Gunnedah, Australia by CSIRO, Canberra, Australia” Cowherd and Pace (2002). Paper # “Potential Role of Vegetative Groundcover in the Removal of Airborne Particles”, Proceedings of Air and Waste Management Association Annual Meeting, Baltimore MD, June 2002 Cowherd, Chatten and Dick L. Gebhart. Paper #69393 “Vegetative Capture of Dust From Unpaved Roads,” Proceedings of Air and Waste Management Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, June 2003 Flagan, R. C Electrical Techniques In Aerosol Measurement, 2nd Edition (edited by P. A. Baron and K. Willeke). John Wiley and Sons, New York Gieseke, J. Q. Thermal Deposition of Aerosols. In Air Pollution Control, Part II (edited by W Strauss), Wiley-Interscience, New York Etyemezian, V et al (2003a). Field Testing and Evaluation of Dust Deposition and Removal Mechanisms – Final Report. Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV, January, Cowherd, Chatten and Dick L. Gebhart. Paper #69393 “Vegetative Capture of Dust From Unpaved Roads,” Proceedings of Air and Waste Management Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, June 2003

17 References Birth, T.L. and C.D. Geron (1995). Users Guide to the Personal Computer Version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS) Version 2.0, Prepared by CRC for US EPA/AEERL, RTP, NC March Etyemezian, V. Personal Communication to T.G. Pace, June 2003b Pace and Cowherd (2003). Paper # “Estimating PM-2.5 Transport Fraction Using Acreage-weighted County Land Cover Characteristics – Example of Concept”, Proceedings of AWMA Annual Mtg, San Diego CA, June 2003 Countess, R (2003). “Reconciling Fugitive Dust Inventories with Ambient Measurements”, presented at the US EPA EI Conference, April 2003, San Diego, CA He, Shan, Jason Ching, Dale Gillette, William Benjey, Thompson Pace, Thomas Pierce (2002). “Modeling Fugitive Dust in US with Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling System”, Presented at AAAR Annual Meeting, Charlotte, NC, October 2002 Dong, Yayi, R. Hardy and M. McGown (2003). “Why Road Dust Concentrations are Overestimated in Eulerian Grid Models”, in Appendix K, Northern Ada County (Idaho) PM10 Maintenance Plan. Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, June 2003 Irwin, John (2003). U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC. Personal Communication to T.G. Pace, June 16, 2003

18 Acknowledgements The author is grateful to: Dr. John Watson, Dr. Chatten Cowherd, Dr. Judith Chow, Dr. Richard Countess, Dr. John Irwin, Dr. Frank Binkowski, Dr. Dale Gillette, Dr. Vican Etyemezian and Mr. William Barnard for their research, insight and thoughtful consideration of the issues as this conceptual model evolved.


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