Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Analysing Texts Part Three. Coffee Break Analysis To Kill a Mocking Bird Harper Lee Take five minutes to refresh or improve your skills. Each extract.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Analysing Texts Part Three. Coffee Break Analysis To Kill a Mocking Bird Harper Lee Take five minutes to refresh or improve your skills. Each extract."— Presentation transcript:

1 Analysing Texts Part Three

2 Coffee Break Analysis To Kill a Mocking Bird Harper Lee Take five minutes to refresh or improve your skills. Each extract should take you just five minutes. Jot down your thoughts to discuss with your teacher.

3 Here are the assessment objectives you will have to cover in your examinations: AO1 Respond to texts critically and imaginatively; select and evaluate relevant textual detail to illustrate and support interpretations. (Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations.) AO2 Explain how language, structure and form contribute to writers’ presentation of ideas, themes and settings. (How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc. you have picked out to create meaning?) AO4 Relate texts to their social, cultural and historical contexts; explain how texts have been influential and significant to self and other readers in different contexts and at different times. (How important is the time in which the text was written to the meaning – would a reader today and a reader at the time the text was written react differently to what is being said?)

4 What do we find out about Maycomb from this extract? Maycomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when I first knew it. In rainy weather the streets turned to red slop... [s]omehow it was hotter then... bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square. Men’s stiff collars wilted by nine in the morning. Ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o’clock naps, and by nightfall were like soft teacakes with frostings of sweat and sweet talcum.... There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb County. But it was a time of vague optimism for some of the people: Maycomb County had recently been told that it had nothing to fear but fear itself. If you are stuck – look at the clues on the next slide and then return...

5 Clues: What do we find out about Maycomb? What words and images are used to describe - the slow pace - the heat - the old-fashioned values of the town. Who do we imagine is narrating? When? (Look at the phrase ‘first knew’.) What clues are we given in the description regarding the story’s time setting? Look at the line “We have nothing to fear but fear itself” as well, this is a famous line from Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s first inaugural speech, made after the 1932 presidential election. Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said?

6 What do we find out about Atticus as a father from the following extract: Bit by bit, I told him the day’s misfortunes. “-and she said you taught me all wrong, so we can’t ever read any more, ever. Please don’t send me back, please sir.” Atticus stood up and walked to the end of the porch. When he completed his examination of the wisteria vine he strolled back to me. “if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view-” “Sir?” “-until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” Atticus said I had learned many things today, and Miss Caroline had learned several things herself. She had learned not to hand something to a Cunningham, for one thing, but if Walter and I had put ourselves in her shoes we’d have seen it was an honest mistake on her part. We could not expect her to learn all Maycomb’s ways in one day, and we could not hold her responsible when she knew no better “But if I keep on goin‘ to school, we can’t ever read any more…” “That’s really bothering you, isn’t it?” “Yes sir.”... Cont.

7 ...When Atticus looked down at me I saw the expression on his face that always made me expect something. “Do you know what a compromise is?” he asked. “Bending the law?” “No, an agreement reached by mutual concessions. It works this way,” he said. “If you’ll concede the necessity of going to school, we’ll go on reading every night just as we always have. Is it a bargain?” “Yes sir!” “We’ll consider it sealed without the usual formality,” Atticus said, when he saw me preparing to spit. As I opened the front screen door Atticus said, “By the way, Scout, you’d better not say anything at school about our agreement.” “Why not?” “I’m afraid our activities would be received with considerable disapprobation by the more learned authorities.” Jem and I were accustomed to our father’s last-will-and-testament diction, and we were at all times free to interrupt Atticus for a translation when it was beyond our understanding. If you are stuck – look at the clues on the next slide and then return...

8 Clues What sort of advice is Atticus giving Scout? How does he talk to Scout, what sort of language does he use? How does Scout react to him and the advice and the solution he offers? How can we tell the difference between the older voice of Scout and the younger Scout in the extract? Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said or not?

9 How is the mockingbird presented here? How does the Mocking Bird motif relate to the wider issues in the Text? “Remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. “Your father’s right,” she said. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy... but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” If you are stuck – look at the clues on the next slide and then return...

10 Clues What words are used to present the binary opposites (good/bad) in this extract? Think about this motif in terms of characters within the text as a whole. Can you remember anywhere in the text where Scout repeats these words to make sense of her world? Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said or not?

11 How is this description effective in showing how Scout puts Atticus’ earlier advice into action here? A boy trudged down the sidewalk dragging a fishing pole behind him. A man stood waiting with his hands on his hips. Summertime, and his children played in the front yard with their friend, enacting a strange little drama of their own invention. It was fall, and his children fought on the sidewalk in front of Mrs. Dubose’s.... Fall, and his children trotted to and fro around the corner, the day’s woes and triumphs on their faces. They stopped at an oak tree, delighted, puzzled, apprehensive. Winter, and his children shivered at the front gate, silhouetted against a blazing house. Winter, and a man walked into the street, dropped his glasses, and shot a dog. Summer, and he watched his children’s heart break. Autumn again, and Boo’s children needed him. Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough. If you are stuck – look at the clues on the next slide and then return...

12 Clues Where is Scout? What is she recounting? From whose perspective is she seeing the events? How do we know? What has changed about the way Scout sees herself and her world? How do we know? Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said or not?

13 How is a sense of security and peace built into this extract? “H’rm,” he said. “The Gray Ghost, by Seckatary Hawkins. Chapter One…” I willed myself to stay awake, but the rain was so soft and the room was so warm and his voice was so deep and his knee was so snug that I slept. Seconds later, it seemed, his shoe was gently nudging my ribs. He lifted me to my feet and walked me to my room. “Heard every word you said,” I muttered. “…wasn’t sleep at all, ‘s about a ship an’ Three-Fingered Fred ‘n’ Stoner’s Boy…” He unhooked my overalls, leaned me against him, and pulled them off. He held me up with one hand and reached for my pyjamas with the other. “Yeah, an‘ they all thought it was Stoner’s Boy messin’ up their clubhouse an‘ throwin’ ink all over it an‘…” He guided me to the bed and sat me down. He lifted my legs and put me under the cover. “An‘ they chased him ’n‘ never could catch him ’cause they didn’t know what he looked like, an‘ Atticus, when they finally saw him, why he hadn’t done any of those things… Atticus, he was real nice....” His hands were under my chin, pulling up the cover, tucking it around me. “Most people are, Scout, when you finally see them.” He turned out the light and went into Jem’s room. He would be there all night, and he would be there when Jem waked up in the morning.

14 Clues What is The Gray Ghost about? How does the theme of this book support the themes in To Kill a Mocking Bird? What is happening in the extract? How is the extract structured? How does this support the overall tone of the extract? How do the details, the actions and images created, suggest warmth, peace and a sense of security? Who is providing this feeling in the extract? Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said or not?

15 Coffee Break Analysis Of Mice and Men Steinbeck Take five minutes to refresh or improve your skills. Each extract should take you just five minutes. Jot down your thoughts to discuss with your teacher.

16 Here are the assessment objectives you will have to cover in your examinations: AO1 Respond to texts critically and imaginatively; select and evaluate relevant textual detail to illustrate and support interpretations. (Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations.) AO2 Explain how language, structure and form contribute to writers’ presentation of ideas, themes and settings. (How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc. you have picked out to create meaning?) AO4 Relate texts to their social, cultural and historical contexts; explain how texts have been influential and significant to self and other readers in different contexts and at different times. (How important is the time in which the text was written to the meaning – would a reader today and a reader at the time the text was written react differently to what is being said?)

17 How is George made a spokesperson for Steinbeck’s views here? Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no fambly. They don’t belong no place. They come to a ranch an’ work up a stake and then they go into town and blow their stake, and the first thing you know they’re poundin’ their tail on some other ranch. They ain’t got nothing to look ahead to.” Lennie was delighted. “That’s it—that’s it. Now tell how it is with us.” George went on. “With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us. If you are stuck – look at the clues on the next slide and then return...

18 Clues: Think about how George’s voice is created. Think about the assurance he gives to Lennie. How does he set himself and Lennie apart form the other men at the time? What does George feel is responsible for much of the suffering of men in their position? Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said?

19 How does Steinbeck create a real sense of excitement and happiness here? “George stood up. “We’ll do her,” he said. “We’ll fix up that little old place an’ we’ll go live there.” He sat down again. They all sat still, all bemused by the beauty of the thing, each mind was popped into the future when this lovely thing should come about. George said wonderingly, “S’pose they was a carnival or a circus come to town, or a ball game, or any damn thing.” Old Candy nodded in appreciation of the idea. “We’d just go to her,” George said. “We wouldn’t ask nobody if we could. Jus’ say, ‘We’ll go to her,’ an’ we would. Jus’ milk the cow and sling some grain to the chickens an’ go to her.” cont...

20 If you are stuck – look at the clues on the next slide and then return “An’ put some grass to the rabbits,” Lennie broke in. “I wouldn’t never forget to feed them. When we gon’ta do it, George?” “In one month. Right squack in one month. Know what I’m gon’ta do? I’m gon’ta write to them old people that owns the place that we’ll take it. An’ Candy’ll send a hunderd dollars to bind her.” “Sure will,” said Candy. “They got a good stove there?” “Sure, got a nice stove, burns coal or wood.” “I’m gonna take my pup,” said Lennie. “I bet by Christ he likes it there, by Jesus.”.”

21 Clues What sort of language is used here? Think about the structure of the piece – the dialogue, the description, the pauses. Think about how each character reacts. What is it the men are most looking forward to? How does this support the major themes in the novel? Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said or not?

22 How is Crooks’ character presented in this extract? “What rabbits?” “We’re gonna have rabbits an’ a berry patch.” “You’re nuts.” “We are too. You ast George.” “You’re nuts.” Crooks was scornful. “I seen hunderds of men come by on the road an’ on the ranches, with their bindles on their back an’ that same damn thing in their heads. Hunderds of them. They come, an’ they quit an’ go on; an’ every damn one of ‘em’s got a little piece of land in his head. An’ never a God damn one of ‘em ever gets it. Just like heaven. Ever’body wants a little piece of lan’. I read plenty of books out here. Nobody never gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land. It’s just in their head. They’re all the time talkin’ about it, but it’s jus’ in their head.” If you are stuck – look at the clues on the next slide and then return...

23 Clues Think about how what he says is aimed at Lennie. Think about the tone of voice here, how is it created? What has helped to create Crooks’ view of the world?. Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said or not?

24 How does Steinbeck allow us to empathise with Crooks in this passage? ‘I didn’t mean to scare you. He’ll come back. I was talkin’ about myself. A guy sets alone out here at night, maybe readin’ books or thinkin’ or stuff like that. Sometimes he gets thinkin’, an’ he got nothing to tell him what’s so an’ what ain’t so. Maybe if he sees somethin’, he don’t know whether it’s right or not. He can’t turn to some other guy and ast him if he sees it too. He can’t tell. He got nothing to measure by. I seen things out here. I wasn’t drunk. I don’t know if I was asleep. If some guy was with me, he could tell me I was asleep, an’ then it would be all right. But I jus’ don’t know.” Crooks was looking across the room now, looking toward the window. Lennie said miserably, “George wun’t go away and leave me. I know George wun’t do that.” The stable buck went on dreamily, “I remember when I was a little kid on my old man’s chicken ranch. Had two brothers. They was always near me, always there. Used to sleep right in the same room, right in the same bed—all three. Had a strawberry patch. Had an alfalfa patch. Used to turn the chickens out in the alfalfa on a sunny morning. My brothers’d set on a fence rail an’ watch ‘em —white chickens they was.”’

25 Clues How is Crooks made to seem vulnerable here? How is he contrasted with Lennie here? Look at Lennie’s dialogue? What does Crooks dream about? Why is there no sense of hope in Crooks’ ‘dreaminess’? Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said or not?

26 How does the imagery in this description from the end of the novel help to emphasise the novella’s themes? The deep green pool of the Salinas River was still in the late afternoon. Already the sun had left the valley to go climbing up the slopes of the Gabilan Mountains, and the hilltops were rosy in the sun. But by the pool among the mottled sycamores, a pleasant shade had fallen. A water snake glided smoothly up the pool, twisting its periscope head from side to side; and it swam the length of the pool and came to the legs of a motionless heron that stood in the shallows. A silent head and beak lanced down and plucked it out by the head, and the beak swallowed the little snake while its tail waved frantically. A far rush of wind sounded and a gust drove through the tops of the trees like a wave. The sycamore leaves turned up their silver sides, the brown, dry leaves on the ground scudded a few feet. And row on row of tiny wind waves flowed up the pool's green surface. As quickly as it had come, the wind died, and the clearing was quiet again. The heron stood in the shallows, motionless and waiting. Another little water snake swam up the pool, turning its periscope head from side to side. If you are stuck – look at the clues on the next slide and then return...

27 Clues Think about how this is similar to the description at the opening of the novel and how it is different. What images are taken form the first story of the Bible here and how are they used? Look back at the extract now. Remember: AO1 - Pick out detail that is relevant to the question and use quotations. AO2 - How does the writer use the details (words, images, similes, metaphor etc.etc.) you have picked out to create meaning? AO4 - How important to the meaning of the text is the time in which it was written? Would a reader at the time it was written and a reader today react differently to what is being said or not?


Download ppt "Analysing Texts Part Three. Coffee Break Analysis To Kill a Mocking Bird Harper Lee Take five minutes to refresh or improve your skills. Each extract."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google