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Introductory Lectures in Fundamentals of Christian Leadership.

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1 Introductory Lectures in Fundamentals of Christian Leadership

2 BIBLICAL IMAGES AND VALUES FOR SHAPING AND MOTIVATING Session 3

3 Introduction Christian Leadership in the Bible are pictured in many ways by different metaphors. Christian Leadership in the Bible are pictured in many ways by different metaphors. – Biblical images concerning leadership can be adapted in any culture. – Each metaphor has a particular meaning It gives the reader another view of the responsibilities of the leader and what is expected from him or her. 3

4 Metaphors 4 servantshepherdstewardApostlewitnessbuilderfarmerAthleteherald Regardless how we look at leadership, It becomes clear: “Leadership”“serving.”

5 Various traits of leadership The various traits of leadership are clearly stated in both Testaments. The various traits of leadership are clearly stated in both Testaments. – Delimitating to the New Testament, we find leaders are called, among other things – “apostles” and “heralds” (1 Timothy 2:7 NIV), – “witnesses” (Luke 24:48; Acts 1:8), – “builders” (1 Corinthians 3:10), – “farmers” (2 Timothy 2:6), – “athletes” (2 Timothy 2:5 5

6 The scope of this session will be limited to the image servanthood to explain how they best serve Maltese Christian leadership. The scope of this session will be limited to the image servanthood to explain how they best serve Maltese Christian leadership. – This does not mean servanthood in Malta is ideal, because it is not. – We as leaders must not only talk about serving and sacrificing, but by practice, my must lead by example. 6

7 The meaning of “servant” The word “servant” in English is a representative of an array of words from the Greek New Testament. The word “servant” in English is a representative of an array of words from the Greek New Testament. – A servant is one to whom both tasks and relationships have been entrusted. 7 The servant ‘serves’ as a ‘trustee’ (steward) who is ‘appointed’ or ‘given’ to accomplish what has been ‘placed’ in his or her hand” (Elliston)

8 Elected parliamentary members, who are democratically elected to lead the nation, call themselves “ministers.” Elected parliamentary members, who are democratically elected to lead the nation, call themselves “ministers.” – This is the same word which is used for the clergy in the Roman Catholic Church. – The term minster is used in other countries such as in the United Kingdom, to refer to ministers of the clergy. 8

9 In Malta, within the Evangelical church the usual word used for religious ministers is “pastor.” In Malta, within the Evangelical church the usual word used for religious ministers is “pastor.” – Regardless if the person is a teacher, an evangelist or missionary, the office is given the title as “pastor.” – Whether this is appropriate or not to mention this issue in this seminar, one needs to begin to address this issue at some point. 9

10 The connotation of “minister” The connotation of a “minister,” whether in secular or religious contexts, is to be a servant to his or her people. The connotation of a “minister,” whether in secular or religious contexts, is to be a servant to his or her people. – The Maltese conception of the title “pastor” is connected with “shepherd.” – This is a very common image to understand servanthood, as usually the shepherd, shepherds the flock owned by himself. 10

11 Biblical servanthood is described in many ways. Biblical servanthood is described in many ways. – In the next slide we have a chart with some Biblical words from the Hebrew text and the Greek New Testament – They give us a typical understanding of leadership. – Stotts description of a leader is 11 “One who acts in his master’s name, and thus his master is acting through him”. (1961, 104)

12 12 DESCRIPTION OF A SERVANT Hebrew Word Description Ideal Typical Cultural Application tr^v* A person in Bondage (Vine et al); to act as an attendant, and a temple worshipper (Strong), a slave who is in a permanent relation of servitude to another (Harris) A leader who is a worshiper and is an attendant to his congregation. A person who permanently serve his people. To serve in the tabernacle. Serving to higher authority. (Harris). The leader who knows when he is serving his people is serving God. Serving and sacrificing for the people of God will be his desire. db^U* To work as a slave, the lowest of slaves The leader who does not lord over his congregation, but willing to be the lowest of all

13 13 DESCRIPTION OF A SERVANT Greek Word Description Ideal Typical Cultural Application dou=lo$ A person in Bondage (Vine et al); a slave who is in a permanent relation of servitude to another (Zodhiates, et al.) A minister who does not seek his own advantages but is willing to act as a slave instead of lording over his followers. Like Jesus emptying himself from his rights to give them to others (Philippians 2:7) dia//kono $ A person who hastens to follow directives of his master, running though dust while doing so (Zodhiates et al.) while serving the needs of others (Balz et al.). A person who quickly executes the orders of his superiors to get the job done. Not because of coercive power, but of referent power.

14 14 DESCRIPTION OF A SERVANT Greek Word Description Ideal Typical Cultural Application oi)keth $ The manager of a household or of household affairs overseeing the work of someone else property (Thayer). A household servant (Vine et al.). One belonging to a house but not necessarily born in the house (Zodhiates et al.), a personal servant of the master (Louw and Nida). This refers to a leader who is in charge of an enterprise which does not belong to him or her but was trusted with it by the owner. According to Luke 16:7, such a servant must be trustful and will be held to give account of his responsibilities. Whether in secular leadership or the church, leaders are expected to be accountable about all they do. If government ministers are to give account even what they do in their private life, how much more church leaders?

15 15 DESCRIPTION OF A SERVANT Greek Word Description Ideal Typical Cultural Application u(phre/th $ An under-oarsman— generally subordinate assistant (Strong). One who rowed in the lower level of a war galley (Stott, 103). One who is bound to his oar at the bottom of a galley for life and receiving on him all the natural discharge of other oarsman bound above him (Dr. Peacock’s definition of u(phre/t$)) ) A dedicated minister who knows he is in ministry for life willing to be subordinate even to other leaders willing to suffer and willing to receive all that might not be pleasant in ministry life, as a result of his position, such as psychological and verbal abuse even from those whom the leader loves and sacrifice for.

16 16 DESCRIPTION OF A SERVANT Greek Word Description Ideal Typical Cultural Application Qera/pwn To serve and heal (Vine et al.) a menial attendant as if cherishing (Strong), denoting a faithful friend to a superior “who solicitously regards the superior’s interest or looks after his affairs” serving willingly by love and bound by duty (Zodhiates et al.) This interesting word is akin to qerapeu/w (vine et al.). It is an image of a servant- follower whose fidelity to his master is more important than his own interests. He is motivated by love and not of what he can acquire out for his services. Moses was such a faithful servant in God’s house. Both secular and religious leadership are to be faithful to one who calls them; especially church leaders who are a servant in God’s house.

17 CHRISTIAN LEADERS MUST BE VISIONARY LEADERS The concept of visionary leadership is actually very important for the Maltese Evangelical- Pentecostal church. The concept of visionary leadership is actually very important for the Maltese Evangelical- Pentecostal church. – Those who, in one way or the other, manage to become leaders, with no calling will end up having no divine vision to guide them. – Pastors can’t simply appoint leaders because of an emergency need 17

18 Each Vision is Specifically Given to a specific Person Visions can be discerned. Visions can be discerned. – When one who is not called for a specific ministry says he or she has a vision concerning that ministry. An experienced spiritual leader should be able recognize and discern the vision is not from God, but is humanly planned. 18 Leaders must not condone such practices

19 Maltese seasoned leaders know visions cannot be planned by man. Maltese seasoned leaders know visions cannot be planned by man. – One cannot just have an idea and attribute that idea to God. – A person must test that idea to make sure it is not something he likes and wants to do. – A person can have many plans, but those plans cannot become divine for the simple reason one says “God told me!” 19

20 Human plans cannot be “baptized” as divine. Human plans cannot be “baptized” as divine. – Simple, the plans are not come from God (Shawchuck and Heuser 1993, 69). – Divine visions for a specific mission will only be given to the person who is specifically chosen and called by God to lead it. 20

21 Each Vision is Accompanied by Empowerment God births vision in a leader for direction. God births vision in a leader for direction. – Every leader who receives a calling will also receive a vision to direct him or her towards the accomplishment of the Divine calling. – With the vision, God will also give certain abilities to the leader to help him fulfill his plan. These can be personal anointing and endowments of gifts upon the leader per se, or the provision of personnel to help the leader fulfill the Divine plan. 21

22 The Bible is full of examples of God empowering people to fulfill His plan. The Bible is full of examples of God empowering people to fulfill His plan. – For example, when Moses was given the vision to build the Tabernacle. – What is most important though is the anointing on the person which marks him or her as the person chosen by God to accomplish that particular vision. 22

23 Each Vision Demands Sacrifice Visionaries are required to take up the cross. Visionaries are required to take up the cross. – The expression "take up the cross" recalls the common practice of the Romans to make the condemned person carry the cross beam to the place of execution. – Such a demand entails that all who follow Jesus must be prepared to suffer and be crucified. 23 Jesus' road to suffering and eventual death by means of the cross became an example of obedience and commitment to God for all who would become disciples.

24 In this respect the call to leadership and discipleship is a call to both self-denial and suffering (Ryken, 1998). In this respect the call to leadership and discipleship is a call to both self-denial and suffering (Ryken, 1998). – The Christian leader calling in general, whether Maltese or not, requires every believer leader to carry his or her cross. – The leader is to be an example of taking up the cross if he or she is to lead others to accomplish their own vision. – The leader has to practice self denial for the sake of reaching the goals the Lord set for him or her. The term, “to serve” or “to minister,” requires self denial, as explained in Table 1 above. 24

25 The Lord demands the whole person and all what was trusted to him or her to fulfill His plan. The Lord demands the whole person and all what was trusted to him or her to fulfill His plan. – The leader who received a vision must expect divine testing. – Testing does not mean the leader is not faithful; on the contrary, the Lord tests the faithful like He tested Abraham, Joseph, Paul and Jesus Himself during their earthly life. – Testing means greater trust and responsibilities are on the way. 25

26 Three Dimensions of a Vision When the Lord gives a vision to any of His servant leaders, the leaders will receive a three dimensional vision. When the Lord gives a vision to any of His servant leaders, the leaders will receive a three dimensional vision. 26 “A three dimensional vision is the “impossible dream,” in which God is dreaming God’s dream in the heart of those who are called to lead” (Shawchuck and Heuser, 70).

27 This is the reason why the leader, who received the vision, must require specific divine insight which does not match the vision of those who are not “sighted;” as they have not received the vision. This is the reason why the leader, who received the vision, must require specific divine insight which does not match the vision of those who are not “sighted;” as they have not received the vision. – Shawchuck and Heuser describe the three dimensional vision as 27 (1) an upward view towards God(2) an inward view of oneself(3) an outward view of the circumstances.

28 Maltese leadership would do well to understand the importance of having a God given calling as the foundation for a Divine vision. Maltese leadership would do well to understand the importance of having a God given calling as the foundation for a Divine vision. – An understanding of this concept may help the church to understand, although every Christian is called to serve, not all Christians are called to be leaders. – The three dimensions of a vision should give understanding to the National Church concerning vision and leadership. 28

29 Vision for mission cannot be discerned without an ever-growing relationship to God, and mission cannot be defined without a clear vision, which is fundamentally dependent on God as its source (Klaus 2005, 26). It is imperative for all local leaders to have a good understanding of the three dimensions of vision, which are very briefly explained in chart two below. 29

30 THREE DIMENTIONS OF A VISION An upward view towards God Requires a personal encounter with God and a personal revelation of the person of God. This will give the receiver of the vision proper insight into the ability of God to accomplish whatever God dreams thought him An inward view of oneself “Please send some else” or “Here I am, send me” are two phrases standing on the polar extremes on the continuum of self perception. They compare the view Moses and Isaiah had concerning the way they saw themselves. It is important for the visionary leader to see himself as God sees him. 30

31 An outward view of the circumstances Circumstances are the catalysts of visions. As the leader is the soil where visions are planted, circumstances are what waters them to make them grow. Shawchuck and Heuser concludes “As you think, so you are, as you view things, so conditions will become” (73). Circumstances are the breeding ground for God given visions, as a result God can manifest his power and grace in the drama of humankind; declaring He is immanent and not transcendent in man’s affairs 31

32 End of Session Three


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