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Life of the Vine A beginner’s guide to growing tomatoes. AUTHOR – Tammy “Michelle” Connally.

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Presentation on theme: "Life of the Vine A beginner’s guide to growing tomatoes. AUTHOR – Tammy “Michelle” Connally."— Presentation transcript:

1 Life of the Vine A beginner’s guide to growing tomatoes. AUTHOR – Tammy “Michelle” Connally

2 Navigation Automatic Slide Advancement, set back and relax. - The buttons are explained below, if needed. Automatic Slide Advancement, set back and relax. - The buttons are explained below, if needed. FORWARD FORWARD BACK BACK HOME HOME The buttons can be found in the bottom right corner. The buttons can be found in the bottom right corner. Click the arrow pointing to the RIGHT to advance each slide manually. Click the arrow pointing to the RIGHT to advance each slide manually.

3 History of the Tomato Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Member of the Solanaceae family Member of the Solanaceae family Tomato came from Peru Tomato came from Peru Domesticated by the Mayans & Mesoamerican farmers in Central America and southern Mexico Domesticated by the Mayans & Mesoamerican farmers in Central America and southern Mexico Exported by the Europeans, the first cookbook mentioning Tomatoes as from Naples in Exported by the Europeans, the first cookbook mentioning Tomatoes as from Naples in 1692.

4 AKA - Also Known As “Tomatl” a Nahuatl word for “the swelling fruit” “Tomatl” a Nahuatl word for “the swelling fruit” Known in Italian as “Pomidoros” Known in Italian as “Pomidoros” Known in Greek as “Esculentum” (edible) Known in Greek as “Esculentum” (edible) Once grown in the US as an only as an ornamental because it was known as the “Cancer Apple” in early American horticulture. Once grown in the US as an only as an ornamental because it was known as the “Cancer Apple” in early American horticulture. Thought to have been poisonous as its relative, the deadly nightshade. Thought to have been poisonous as its relative, the deadly nightshade.

5 Team Fruit or Team Veggie? A tomato was a fruit until 1893 when the supreme court declared they were vegetables. A tomato was a fruit until 1893 when the supreme court declared they were vegetables. This protected tomatoes from being taxed under the Tariff Act of March This protected tomatoes from being taxed under the Tariff Act of March Nix vs. Hedden, 149 U.S. 304 (1893)] Nix vs. Hedden, 149 U.S. 304 (1893)]

6 Tomatoes Today Store and Heirloom [online image] available at

7 Store bought vs. Heirloom An analysis by the US Department of Agriculture highlights that 100 grams of fresh tomato TODAY has An analysis by the US Department of Agriculture highlights that 100 grams of fresh tomato TODAY has 30% less vitamin C 30% less vitamin C 30% less B-1 30% less B-1 19% less B-3 19% less B-3 62% less calcium 62% less calcium than the tomatoes did in The industrial tomatoes of today, however, do provide 14 times more sodium. (1)

8 Pesticides for Conventional Grown Tomatoes Before the seed is planted, an infusion of chemicals applied to the soil in which the roots will grow. Before the seed is planted, an infusion of chemicals applied to the soil in which the roots will grow. Nitrogen and Potassium Chemical Fertilizer Nitrogen and Potassium Chemical Fertilizer Methyl Bromide Methyl Bromide While the tomatoes are growing there is additional exposure to chemicals. While the tomatoes are growing there is additional exposure to chemicals. 19 Herbicides 19 Herbicides 31 Fungicides 31 Fungicides 60 Pesticides 60 Pesticides

9 What to Plant Cherokee Purples Cherokee Purples German Stripe German Stripe Mortgage Lifter Mortgage Lifter Brandywine Brandywine Hawaiian Pineapple Hawaiian Pineapple Mr. Stripey Mr. Stripey Heirloom Tomatoes Picture

10 Items needed to plant Seedling Trays Seedling Trays Sterile Soil Sterile Soil Warming Pad Warming Pad Mister Spray bottle Mister Spray bottle Liquid Fertilizer Liquid Fertilizer Seeds of Heirloom tomatoes Seeds of Heirloom tomatoes Seedling trays [online image] available content/uploads/2007/05/seedlings thumbnail.jpg

11 How to plant Plant seeds 6-8 weeks before the last frost Plant seeds 6-8 weeks before the last frost Soil is al least 60°F with warming pad Soil is al least 60°F with warming pad Follow seed packet directions for planting the seed Follow seed packet directions for planting the seed Keep soil Moist with mister Keep soil Moist with mister Needs 6-8 hours of sun from sunny southern facing window or light source. Needs 6-8 hours of sun from sunny southern facing window or light source. Once seedling emerges, spray liquid fertilizer with mister on leaves once a week. Once seedling emerges, spray liquid fertilizer with mister on leaves once a week.

12 Preparing to move outside Frost will harm and kill young plants Frost will harm and kill young plants Fruit will not set if nighttime temps are below 55°F Fruit will not set if nighttime temps are below 55°F Gradually expose them to the outside Gradually expose them to the outside Seedlings [online image] content/uploads/2007/05/tomatoes thumbnail.jpg content/uploads/2007/05/tomatoes thumbnail.jpg

13 How to transplant outside Sunniest spot in the Garden Sunniest spot in the Garden Go with lightly rotted manure Go with lightly rotted manure Add in some bone meal and wood ashes Add in some bone meal and wood ashes Tomatoes prefer a pH range of 6 to 7 Tomatoes prefer a pH range of 6 to 7 Make the hole larger than needed Make the hole larger than needed Cover bottom with sifted compost Cover bottom with sifted compost Soak Roots in Water or Compost Tea Soak Roots in Water or Compost Tea Mix in heaping teaspoon of Epsom salts Mix in heaping teaspoon of Epsom salts Burying the tomato plant up to its 2 nd set of leaves Burying the tomato plant up to its 2 nd set of leaves

14 Transplanting the seedling outside Tomato transplant [online image} available

15 Potted or Garden Bed Potted Tomato Plant [online image]. Available content/uploads/2011/08/Tomatoes-in-Pot- Gardens.jpg Tomatoes in the Garden [online image] available content/uploads/2012/01/Tomatoes-Garden.jpg

16 Fertilizer & Mulching MULCH, MULCH, MULCH whether you plant in a bed or a pot. MULCH, MULCH, MULCH whether you plant in a bed or a pot. Apply a fertilizer once a week with compost tea or worm casting tea. Apply a fertilizer once a week with compost tea or worm casting tea. Side dress with compost when fruiting and cover with additional mulch. Side dress with compost when fruiting and cover with additional mulch.

17 Pruning Prune the plants by removing the suckers, which are the new growth between the leaf and the stem. Prune the plants by removing the suckers, which are the new growth between the leaf and the stem.

18 How to prune for the first time First prune [online image] available 1156/Images/fig.5.gif

19 Pruning the sucker Tomato Sucker [online image] available

20 Pole Staking Tomato Staking [online image] available

21 Bamboo Trellis Bamboo trellis [online image] available

22 Grapevine Trellis Grapevine trellis [online image] available

23 Supporting with String String Trellis [online image] available

24 Harvesting Read the seed packet for specific harvesting time which can range from days. Read the seed packet for specific harvesting time which can range from days. Best if tomatoes are grown and harvested in 80 degrees temperatures. Best if tomatoes are grown and harvested in 80 degrees temperatures. Temperatures above 90 degrees will adversely affect tomatoes. Temperatures above 90 degrees will adversely affect tomatoes.

25 Saving seeds for next crop Save seeds from the best fruits with sweet and juicy taste that did well in your climate. Save seeds from the best fruits with sweet and juicy taste that did well in your climate. Spread them out on a paper towel and let them dry out. Spread them out on a paper towel and let them dry out. After a month, then move seeds into a container or reseal able bag for storage. After a month, then move seeds into a container or reseal able bag for storage. Saving seeds [online image] available tomato-seeds-lg.jpgttp://cdn1.preen.com/illustr/articles/saving- tomato-seeds-lg.jpg

26 Pests & Diseases I like to give 10% of my crops to Mother Earth and her inhabitants including insects and worms. I like to give 10% of my crops to Mother Earth and her inhabitants including insects and worms. Tomato Hornworm – green worms with black stripes Tomato Hornworm – green worms with black stripes Try to prevent by dusting plant with Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth, do not dust the fruit only the plant. Try to prevent by dusting plant with Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth, do not dust the fruit only the plant. Tomato Fruit worm – moth larvae eat into the tomato and then it is too late, dust with DE Tomato Fruit worm – moth larvae eat into the tomato and then it is too late, dust with DE Remove weak seedlings because these will only be weak and spread disease. Remove weak seedlings because these will only be weak and spread disease.

27 Tomato Hornworm Hornworm [online image] available

28 Tomato Fruit worm Fruit worm [online image] available worm.jpg

29 Gazpacho 1 1/2 pounds tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped Tomato juice, 1 lime, juiced 1 cup cucumber, peeled, seeded and chopped 1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper, red onion 1 small jalapeno, seeded and minced 1 medium garlic clove, minced 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar, Worcestershire sauce 1/2 teaspoon toasted, ground cumin 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons fresh basil leaves, chiffonade Directions Fill a 6-quart pot halfway full of water, set over high heat and bring to a boil. Make an X with a paring knife on the bottom of the tomatoes. Drop the tomatoes into the boiling water for 15 seconds, remove and transfer to an ice bath and allow to cool until able to handle, approximately 1 minute. Remove and pat dry. Peel, core and seed the tomatoes. When seeding the tomatoes, place the seeds and pulp into a fine mesh strainer set over a bowl in order to catch the juice. Press as much of the juice through as possible and then add enough bottled tomato juice to bring the total to 1 cup. Place the tomatoes and juice into a large mixing bowl. Add the cucumber, bell pepper, red onion, jalapeno, garlic clove, olive oil, lime juice, balsamic vinegar, Worcestershire, cumin, salt and pepper and stir to combine. Transfer 1 1/2 cups of the mixture to a blender and puree for 15 to 20 seconds on high speed. Return the pureed mixture to the bowl and stir to combine. Cover and chill for 2 hours and up to overnight. Serve with chiffonade of basil.

30 Credits Estabrook, Barry Tomatoland. Andrews McMeel Publishing LLC Estabrook, Barry Tomatoland. Andrews McMeel Publishing LLC (1) Quote from A Passion for tomatoes article, reference (1) Quote from A Passion for tomatoes article, reference Gazpacho Recipe Gazpacho Recipe recipe/index.html recipe/index.html recipe/index.html recipe/index.html


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