Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

POETRY-1 (ENG403) LECTURE – 9. RECAP OF LECTURE 8 The Renaissance Factors leading to the Renaissance “New Learning” Notable Writers Humanism Edmund Spenser.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "POETRY-1 (ENG403) LECTURE – 9. RECAP OF LECTURE 8 The Renaissance Factors leading to the Renaissance “New Learning” Notable Writers Humanism Edmund Spenser."— Presentation transcript:

1 POETRY-1 (ENG403) LECTURE – 9

2 RECAP OF LECTURE 8 The Renaissance Factors leading to the Renaissance “New Learning” Notable Writers Humanism Edmund Spenser

3 Great Elizabethan Poet Spenserian Stanza The Faerie Queene

4 SPENSER’S STYLE Supreme in his vision, Ultimate world of poetic fluency Ornate imagination Rich imagery Lofty idealism Sensuous poet Luxuriant colour Verbal music

5 SPENSER’S STYLE Blended: romantic ideas, nationalistic feeling, idealistic thought Experimented with language; enriched it Used archaism, allusions

6 THE FARERIE QUEENE 1590 edition Letter to Sir Walter Ralegh “the generall end … is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline”

7 GENERAL PLAN OF THE BOOK (1) 12 Books Each book having 12 Cantos Twelve day feast Held by Gloriana, the Queen Stranger appeared asked for help Giant, tyrant, dragon Assigned a knight

8 GENERAL PLAN OF THE BOOK (2) Each book- Adventure of one knight Each knight- twelve virtues of Aristotle Opposed to the twelve vices Prince Arthur- central figure Ideal knight- symbolizing magnificence

9 GENERAL PLAN OF THE BOOK (3) 1.An allegory of virtues and vices 2.An allegory of the times and people 3.A story of romance and adventure 4.Character and action- double meaning Only Six books were completed Book 7 is unfinished

10 THE ALLEGORY An allegory is an extended metaphor. A story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one. The function of allegory in poetry is to provide two meanings to a poem. Moral Allegory Religious Allegory Political-Historical allegory

11 GUIDE TO SPESOER’S LANGUAGE Archaic spellings: o Replace u with v (giue = give) o Replace i with j (obiect = object) o Replace y with i (Englyshe = English) o Remove the final e (Englyshe = English)

12 THE FAERIE QUEENE Book-1 STORY o George- the knight o Lady Una o The knight slays the dragon o Recovers the castle of lady Una’s father ALLEGORY o The red Cross Knight- St. George; champian of Christian holiness; Anglian Church o Una- truth; true religion o Dragon- Error

13 THE FIRST BOOKE OF THE FAERIE QVEENE. Contayning THE LEGENDE OF THE KNIGHT OF THE RED CROSSE, OR OF HOLINESSE

14 LO I the man, whose Muse whilome did maske, As time her taught, in lowly Shepheards weeds, Am now enforst a far vnfitter taske, For trumpets sterne to chaunge mine Oaten reeds, And sing of Knights and Ladies gentle deeds; Whose prayses hauing slept in silence long, Me, all too meane, the sacred Muse areeds To blazon broad emongst her learned throng: Fierce warres and faithfull loues shall moralize my song.

15 LAYOUT OF THE FAERIE QUEENE Spenserian Stanza o Stanza: 9 Lines o 8 Lines: Iambic Pentameter o 9 th Line: Alexandrine, having 12 syllables o Rhyme Scheme: ababbcbcc

16 LO I the man, whose Muse whilome did maske, As time her taught, in lowly Shepheards weeds, Am now enforst a far vnfitter taske, For trumpets sterne to chaunge mine Oaten reeds, And sing of Knights and Ladies gentle deeds; Whilome- formerly Maske- disguise Weeds- clothes Oaten reeds- musical instrument/shepherds

17 Whose prayses hauing slept in silence long, Me, all too meane, the sacred Muse areeds To blazon broad emongst her learned throng: Fierce warres and faithfull loues shall moralize my song. Areeds- support, advice Blazon- declare, announce

18 Helpe then, ™ holy Virgin chiefe of nine, Thy weaker Nouice to performe thy will, Lay forth out of thine euerlasting scryne The antique rolles, which there lye hidden still, Of Faerie knights and fairest Tanaquill, Virgin- Clio, the muse history Scryne- writing desk Tanaquill- noble queen

19 Whom that most noble Briton Prince so long Sought through the world, and suffered so much ill, That I must rue his vndeserued wrong: O helpe thou my weake wit, and sharpen my dull tong. Briton prince- Prince Arthur Rue- feel pity for Wit- mind Tong- speech

20 And thou most dreaded impe of highest Ioue, Faire Venus sonne, that with thy cruell dart At that good knight so cunningly didst roue, That glorious fire it kindled in his hart, Lay now thy deadly Heben bow apart, Impe- child Venus sonne- Cupid Roue- aim Fire- fire of love Heben- ebony wood/formerly had poisonous properties

21 And with thy mother milde come to mine ayde: Come both, and with you bring triumphant Mart, In loues and gentle iollities arrayd, After his murdrous spoiles and bloudy rage allayd. Mart- Mars, the Roman God of war Arraid- dressed Allayd- decreased

22 And with them eke, O Goddesse heauenly bright, Mirrour of grace and Maiestie diuine, Great Lady of the greatest Isle, whose light Like Phoebus lampe throughout the world doth shine, Shed thy faire beames into my feeble eyne, Lady- Una, representing truth Isle- Great Britain Lampe- the light of the sun

23 And raise my thoughts too humble and too vile, To thinke of that true glorious type of thine, The argument of mine afflicted stile: The which to heare, vouchsafe, O dearest dred a- while. Type- Gloriana, the type of Elizabeth Argument- subject Afflicted- lowly Stile- writing, pen Vouchsafe- be pleased

24 Canto I The Patron of true Holinesse, Foule Errour doth defeate: Hypocrisie him to entrappe, Doth to his home entreate. Patron- the Red Cross Knight Errour- Falsehood Hypocrisie- represented by Archimago

25 Gentle Knight was pricking on the plaine, Y cladd in mightie armes and siluer shielde, Wherein old dints of deepe wounds did remaine, The cruell markes of many' a bloudy fielde; Yet armes till that time did he neuer wield: Knight- the Red Cross Knight/Holiness Pricking- riding by spurring the horse Ycladd- clad, dressed, equipped Dints- signs, marks

26 His angry steede did chide his foming bitt, As much disdayning to the curbe to yield: Full iolly knight he seemd, and faire did sitt, As one for knightly giusts and fierce encounters fitt. Steede- horse Chide- chafe at Bitt- iron mouthpiece of bridle Curbe- chain passing under lower jaw of horse, check Jolly- handsome Guists- joust, dispute between two knights on horsebacks with lances

27 But on his brest a bloudie Crosse he bore, The deare remembrance of his dying Lord, For whose sweete sake that glorious badge he wore, And dead as liuing euer him ador'd: Badge- brooch, symbol

28 Vpon his shield the like was also scor'd, For soueraine hope, which in his helpe he had: Right faithfull true he was in deede and word, But of his cheere did seeme too solemne sad; Yet nothing did he dread, but euer was ydrad. Scor’d- marked Soveraine- supreme Cheere- expression Sad- serious Ydrad- dreaded by others

29 Vpon a great aduenture he was bond, That greatest Gloriana to him gaue, That greatest Glorious Queene of Faerie lond, To winne him worship, and her grace to haue, Which of all earthly things he most did craue; Bond- bound Gloriana- the Faerie Queen Worshipe- honour

30 And euer as he rode, his hart did earne To proue his puissance in battell braue Vpon his foe, and his new force to learne; Vpon his foe, a Dragon horrible and stearne. Earne- desire Puissance- power Dragon- a mythical monster like crocodile

31 A louely Ladie rode him faire beside, Vpon a lowly Asse more white then snow, Yet she much whiter, but the same did hide Vnder a vele, that wimpled was full low, And ouer all a blacke stole she did throw, Ladie- Una, personifying truth Asse- representing humility Snow- symbolizes purity Vele- veil Wimpled- gathered into plaits Stole- a long rob worn by priests

32 As one that inly mournd: so was she sad, And heauie sat vpon her palfrey slow: Seemed in heart some hidden care she had, And by her in a line a milke white lambe she lad. Palfery- horse Lambe- representing innocence

33 So pure and innocent, as that same lambe, She was in life and euery vertuous lore, And by descent from Royall lynage came Of ancient Kings and Queenes, that had of yore Their scepters stretcht from East to Westerne shore, Lore- doctrine of virtue Lynage- lineage, famiy Yore- in the past Scepters- staff born as symbol of power

34 And all the world in their subiection held; Till that infernall feend with foule vprore Forwasted all their land, and them expeld: Whom to auenge, she had this Knight from far co[m]peld. Feend- the dragon Forwasted- completely wasted Compeld- called to her aid

35 Behind her farre away a Dwarfe did lag, That lasie seemd in being euer last, Or wearied with bearing of her bag Of needments at his backe. Thus as they past, Dwarfe- common sense Needments- necessaries

36 The day with cloudes was suddeine ouercast, And angry Ioue an hideous storme of raine Did poure into his Lemans lap so fast, That euery wight to shrowd it did constrain, And this faire couple eke to shroud the[m]selues were fain. Ouercast- covered Lemans- lady-love’s sweetharts Wight- creature Shroud- take shelter Fain- willing under cmpulsion

37 Enforst to seeke some couert nigh at hand, A shadie groue not far away they spide, That promist ayde the tempest to withstand: Whose loftie trees yclad with sommers pride, Did spred so broad, that heauens light did hide, Covert- shelter Spide- saw Yclad- dressed

38 Not perceable with power of any starre: And all within were pathes and alleies wide, With footing worne, and leading inward farre: Faire harbour that them seemes; so in they entred arre. Perceable- penetrable Alleies- passages in garden etc. Harbour- shelter

39 And foorth they passe, with pleasure forward led, Ioying to heare the birdes sweete harmony, Which therein shrouded from the tempest dred, Seemd in their song to scorne the cruell sky. Shrouded- sheltered

40 Much can they prayse the trees so straight and hy, The sayling Pine, the Cedar proud and tall, The vine-prop Elme, the Poplar neuer dry, The builder Oake, sole king of forrests all, The Aspine good for staues, the Cypresse funerall. Pine- pine for making sailing ships Vine-prop- vine supporting Oake- the oak used for building purposes Aspine- the asp tree Staues- carved pieces of wood forming sides of cask

41 The Laurell, meed of mightie Conquerours And Poets sage, the Firre that weepeth still, The Willow worne of forlorne Paramours, The Eugh obedient to the benders will, Meed- reward Paramours- the fur that continually gives off Eugh- the Yew used for making bow Benders- the bowman

42 The Birch for shaftes, the Sallow for the mill, The Mirrhe sweete bleeding in the bitter wound, The warlike Beech, the Ash for nothing ill, The fruitfull Oliue, and the Platane round, The caruer Holme, the Maple seeldom inward sound. Bleeding- the myrrh excluding sweet smelling medicinal gum Beech- the beech of which war chariots were made Platane- plain tree of broad trunk Holme- the holm suitable for carving

43 Led with delight, they thus beguile the way, Vntill the blustring storme is ouerblowne; When weening to returne, whence they did stray, They cannot finde that path, which first was showne, Beguile- delude, deceive Blustering- fierce, boisterous, unruly Overblowne- passed Weening- thinking

44 But wander too and fro in wayes vnknowne, Furthest from end then, when they neerest weene, That makes them doubt, their wits be not their owne: So many pathes, so many turnings seene, That which of them to take, in diuerse doubt they been. Weene- think Doubt- fear Diuerse- diverse, various

45 REVIEW OF LECTURE 9 Story o A Knight o Lady Una o A Lamb o A Dwarf Allegory


Download ppt "POETRY-1 (ENG403) LECTURE – 9. RECAP OF LECTURE 8 The Renaissance Factors leading to the Renaissance “New Learning” Notable Writers Humanism Edmund Spenser."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google