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2003 I august CREATING COORDINATION COMPELLING EMPLOYMENT BUILDING TECHNOLOGY TRANSLATING DESTINATION VIBRANT TRANSFORMATION CULTURAL COLABORATION Office.

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Presentation on theme: "2003 I august CREATING COORDINATION COMPELLING EMPLOYMENT BUILDING TECHNOLOGY TRANSLATING DESTINATION VIBRANT TRANSFORMATION CULTURAL COLABORATION Office."— Presentation transcript:

1 2003 I august CREATING COORDINATION COMPELLING EMPLOYMENT BUILDING TECHNOLOGY TRANSLATING DESTINATION VIBRANT TRANSFORMATION CULTURAL COLABORATION Office of University Architect Community Development University of Cincinnati Institutions & Community in Context D e v e l o p m e n t Aligning Strategic Interests

2 The immediate trade area is home to five of the ten largest tri-state employers and the largest concentration of major institutions in the Greater Cincinnati area, second only to Downtown Cincinnati as an employment center. Major institutions include: The University of Cincinnati (#1) University Medical Center (The Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati (#2)), Children’s Hospital Medical Center (#10), and eight additional hospitals, including TriHealth Inc. (#9) Kingsgate Conference Center operated by Marriott Cincinnati State College E.P.A. Cincinnati Zoological & Botanical Gardens Hebrew Union College Cincinnati Public Schools (#7) Population 159,237 Households 71,399 Avg. HH Income $46,961 Median Property Value $100,955 Immediate Area Res. 54,825 Student Population 35,000 Faculty & Staff 14,600 Campus Visitors 178,000 Immediate Area Workers 48,860 The UpTOWN is a short drive down scenic hills to Downtown Cincinnati’s CBD and riverfront. All three of the city’s interstates offer immediate access to the UpTOWN area, including I-71 from east and northeast, I-75 from Dayton and the northwester suburbs and I-74 from Indiana and the western suburbs. UC students 35,000 $81,500,00 Employees 48,860 $120,000,000 Campus visitors 178,000 $6,400,000 Central Location Employment Hub Primary Target Market Segments Expenditure Population Trade Ares Demographics Radius Population Residents Households 1 mile 31,000 12,812 3 mile 157,872 67,000 5 mile 360, ,006 economic impact medical center $3.05 billion annual economic impact on the Tristate UpTOWN Profile market area for partnerships

3 University Master Plan context for partnerships Hargreaves Associates, Planning Consultant Dr. Joseph A. Steger, President Dale McGirr, VP of Finance Ronald Kull, University Architect University Profile Est Campuses: 5 Colleges: 15 Annual Budget $705 million Endowment: $899 million Annual Payroll: $319 million Eco. Impact: $2.04 billion / OH 1990 Master Plan 1994 Master Plan Update 2000 Master Plan Update Implementation Commitment: , +$1 billion Signature Architecture Program Research I institution Land Main (West): acres Medical (East): 57.0 acres Buildings Main (West): 75 Medical (East): 22 Square Footage Main (West): 5,712,509 Medical (East): 2,297,108 Tangeman University Center Gwathemy Siegel Assoc., architect Student Recreation Center Thom Mayne, Morphosis, architect Varsity Village Bernard Tschumi, architect The College-Conservatory of Music Henry N. Cobb, architect Vontz Ctr for Molecular Studies Frank Gehry, architect TUC (left) & the Braid Building (right), Moore Ruble Yudell, architects Aronoff Ctr for Design & Art Peter Eisenman, architect “one of the most architecturally dynamic campuses in America.” – The New York Times Engineering E.R.C. Michael Graves, architect Campus Green Hargreaves Associates

4 Economic Development Goals of the Partnerships Second Ring Concept Increased Housing Options /All Income Levels Business District Stabilization & Redevelopment Investment Theme –$500 million in total investment $375 million in investment from development corporation bonds, banks, city infrastructure, and private contributions, combined with $125 million in loan co-investment from area institutions –$100 million in other private investment in the Uptown by 2008 Retail and housing (rental & owner-occupied). Framework University Master Plan Economic Research Associates: Retail Market Study Land Use Plan positioned for partnerships

5 Typical Goals Typical Membership BusinessUC Community Typical Development Entity Framework Develop new housing, retail and business Stabilize existing business districts Work in partnership with City and regional initiatives 5 Trustees 3 community leaders 1 local business leader 1 UC representative

6 Community Development Entities CORRYVILLE CLIFTON HTS. CORRYVILLE HEIGHTS CLIFTON AVONDALE UPTOWN 1991 Corryville 1995 Corryville Community Dev. Corp. 1997Corryville Economic Dev. Corp. 1998Empowerment Zone Round II Designation, CUF, Corryville, Mt. Auburn & Avondale 1998 Bellevue Gardens Community Urban Redevelopment Corp., Corryville 1999 Clifton Heights Community Urban Redevelopment Corp., CUF 2001 University Heights Community Urban Redevelopment Corp., The Heights 2003Uptown Crossings Community Urban Redevelopment Corp., Corryville

7 03’ Community Development at UC Community Development Corporations City Connections UpTOWN Consortium Children’s Medical Ctr Health Alliance TriHealth UC Zoo Business Associations Community Issues Metro Connections Community Councils Office of University President UHCURC CHCURC UCCURC Avondale Clifton C.U.F. Heights BGCURC Ludlow Clifton Hts. UC Main St. CEDC CCDC Corryville Mt. Auburn Burnet Ave. Univ. Hts. Port Authority Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation Empowerment Zone Findley Market Dev. Corp. Emery Center Development Hyde Park Observatory UC/DAAP Niehoff Urban Studio Uptown Parking Employee Assisted Housing Student Disturbance Committee (Student Life) Transportation UC Civic Engagement Council Great Cities Symposium – Universities: UC, Xavier, NKU; Partnership for a Greater Cincinnati/ Northern KY (Chamber) Project Manager Community Development Consultants Coordinator, Community Development Endowment Properties Communications Governmental Relations VP Communications & Governmental Relations VP of Finance Office of University Architect UC Endowment Budget & Treasure’s Office Real Estate Specialist Work Groups: Charter Transportation Housing Shared Services Public Safety Community Connections ( WEB based tool)

8 principles Community Development Toolkit Principles for Partnering with Communities The Office of University Architect, implementing these ten powerful principles in partnership with residents, businesses, institutions and the development community, is leading regions urban revitalization efforts in Cincinnati’s UpTOWN area. These principles are meeting the unique challenges and opportunities urban communities have to offer - through purposeful partnerships. Contextual: respect a neighborhood’s fabric. Contextual: respect a neighborhood’s fabric. Mutual Benefits: community & institutional goals must have standing and be pursued continuously. Mutual Benefits: community & institutional goals must have standing and be pursued continuously. Local Representation: partnerships through neighborhood entities not individuals. Local Representation: partnerships through neighborhood entities not individuals. Local Control: neighborhoods must have voting control of development entities. Local Control: neighborhoods must have voting control of development entities. New Partnerships vs. Ownership: expansion through, contact, lease or joint ventures versus direct ownership or operations of facilities. New Partnerships vs. Ownership: expansion through, contact, lease or joint ventures versus direct ownership or operations of facilities. Recycle Resources: connecting assets with opportunities regardless of location to present campus. Recycle Resources: connecting assets with opportunities regardless of location to present campus. Financial Capacity for Competitiveness: provide an initial operating grant and “patient loan capital”. Financial Capacity for Competitiveness: provide an initial operating grant and “patient loan capital”. Community Building: increase the number of employees living near by via Employees Assisted Housing program. Community Building: increase the number of employees living near by via Employees Assisted Housing program. Intentional Relationships: initiate a relationship with the City early & keep it open. Intentional Relationships: initiate a relationship with the City early & keep it open. Realistic Outcomes: requests to City should be realistic & focused on policy support. Realistic Outcomes: requests to City should be realistic & focused on policy support. Whether across the street or around a region, these tools for partnerships can help build diverse, mixed-income neighborhoods – strong, stable, and welcoming to all. Office of University Architect, University of Cincinnati © copyright 2003 TARGETED DEVELOPMENT: THE SECOND RING CONCEPT BUSINESS DISTRICT STABILIZATION & REDEVELOPMENT NEW HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES NEW INVESTMENT THEMES

9 Notable Community & Private Initiatives Clifton Heights NBD Façade Improvement Program Clifton Heights NBD Parking Study Neighborhood Business District Branding Clifton Heights District Short Vine District (Corryville) Corryville Housing Survey UC Employees (812 responses within 72hrs.) Major Uptown Employers & Local Community (future) Corryville Urban Reforestation Project Corryville/BearCat Shuttle Establishing Tax Increment Finance (TIF) Districts Clifton Heights Corryville Clifton Business District Improvement Program Privately Developed Owner-Occupied Townhomes Corryville - Courtyard at East University, 24 Units Clifton Heights – Woodbridge Place, 20 Units Key Institutional Improvements Hughes H.S., Clifton Heights Old St. George, Clifton Heights University Christian Church, Clifton Heights Proposed Corryville TIF Dist. Eden Ave. Rehab Façade Improvements Highland Shuttle Stop UPTOWN

10 UCs Current Investment $75 million approved by University Board for co- investment, of which $25 is drawn and another $45 million set or drawn down by June 2004 $300 million in new construction investment –148,000 sq. ft. com./retail/professional office space –164 units, market-rate owner occupied –269 units, market-rate rental –1462 beds, market-rate student housing products of the partnerships Summer 2003

11 Streetscape Improvements Vine Street CORRYVILLE 1991 Short Vine as a result of Central Utility Plant 1994 NBD support was needed Analysis of NBD problems Image Parking Market Use Shared $’s & People Recreation Center - Land Cost Building Value Corryville Community Center Cincinnati Recreation Commission Public Library Vine & Daniels Conf. Ctr. MLK & Vine Street. Public Library Vine & Daniels Central Utility Plant Short Vine & Daniels 1996 Intersection Improvements Getting Started partnerships

12 Urban Design Planning Area Proposed Theater/Performance Venue CORRYVILLE business district Turner Hall – Vine & Daniel’s Short Vine University Plaza Jefferson Ave. Short Vine Street Redevelopment Kinzelman, Kline Gossman / Goody, Clancy & Associates – Planning Consultants Urban Design Plan estimated completion date Winter 2004

13 KEY STAKEHOLDERS City of Cincinnati Cincinnati Public Schools Corryville Community Council Corryville Family Resource Ctr. Clear Channel Entertainment Fifth Third Bank Health Alliance Kroger Company SchottCo Corporation, Inc. University Village Association University of Cincinnati Urban Design Plan planning process

14 University Village Residential Community Corryville Community Development Corporation (CCDC) – Owner Great Traditions Development Company – Master Developer Humphreys & Partners – Design Architect CORRYVILLE Schematic Development Plan not to scale Project Summary Creation of a “new village” in Corryville, adjacent to UC and the UC Medical Center. Product mix includes “for-sale” and “for-rent” housing accented with a neighborhood retail/professional office component. Target market is the single or couples age Owner-Occupied Units 82 1,200-2,400 $128, ,000 Rental Units 204 1,000-1,100 $700-1,500 per month Retail/ Office 60,000 s.f. Structured Parking 312 Project Cost $56M Construction Fall 2003 residential community MLK Drive Highland Avenue Eden Ave. University Ave. Bellevue Gardens

15 Master Development Plan not to scale CORRYVILLE Walk-up Owner-Occupied Townhomes homeownership units Bellevue Gardens looking southwest from MLK Drive MLK Drive Eden Ave. Highland Avenue Phase I ________ Phase II ________


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