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Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Identifying Solids using Nets Presented April 28, 2006 NCTM 2006 Annual Meeting and Exposition.

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Presentation on theme: "Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Identifying Solids using Nets Presented April 28, 2006 NCTM 2006 Annual Meeting and Exposition."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Identifying Solids using Nets Presented April 28, 2006 NCTM 2006 Annual Meeting and Exposition

2 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Form the solids and find their places. How many edges, points, and faces? The shapes that make two will pass the test, But one that does not must be your quest. Three times as tall as its base is wide, The true King’s future lies inside. Neuschwander, C. (2003) Sir Cumference and the Sword in the Cone. New York: Scholastic Inc. p.5.

3 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland What is an Edge? An edge is where two faces meet.

4 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland What is a vertex? A vertex, or point, is where edges meet.

5 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland What is a Face? A flat surface of a solid is called a face.

6 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland What is a base? The base is the bottom face of a geometric solid. The base of the square pyramid is highlighted in green.

7 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Cube Square Pyramid Rectangular Prism Triangular Prism

8 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Cube6812 Square Pyramid Rectangular Prism Triangular Prism

9 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Cube6812 Square Pyramid 558 Rectangular Prism Triangular Prism

10 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Cube6812 Square Pyramid 558 Rectangular Prism 6812 Triangular Prism

11 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Cube6812 Square Pyramid 558 Rectangular Prism 6812 Triangular Prism 569

12 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland How can you get the number 2 using the number of faces, vertices and edges on the chart? Write some ideas down on your paper for possibilities of having a total of 2. (hint: add faces and vertices together first!)

13 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Faces + Vertices Cube Square Pyramid 558 Rectangular Prism 6812 Triangular Prism 569

14 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Faces + Vertices Cube Square Pyramid Rectangular Prism 6812 Triangular Prism 569

15 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Faces + Vertices Cube Square Pyramid Rectangular Prism Triangular Prism 569

16 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Faces + Vertices Cube Square Pyramid Rectangular Prism Triangular Prism 56911

17 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland “The shapes that make two will pass the test, But one that does not must be your quest.” What can you do to get “2” from the “Faces + Vertices” column? (hint: subtract 2) Neuschwander, C. (2003) Sir Cumference and the Sword in the Cone. New York: Scholastic Inc. p.13

18 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Faces + Vertices Faces + Vertices – Edges Cube Pyramid55810 Rectangular Prism Triangular Prism 56911

19 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Shape Flat Faces Vertices Straight Edges Faces + Vertices Faces + Vertices – Edges Cube Pyramid Rectangular Prism Triangular Prism

20 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland “Three times as tall as its base is wide” If the base of the cone is 14 inches across, what will the height of the cone be? 14 in. X 3 = ?? 14 in. X 3 = 42 in. Neuschwander, C. (2003) Sir Cumference and the Sword in the Cone. New York: Scholastic Inc. p.5.

21 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland Is 47 inches too tall or too short? It is too tall!

22 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland If the Edgecalibur is about 48 inches tall, how wide will the base of the cone be? 48 inches ÷ 3 = ?? 16 inches

23 Presented by Colleen Eddy, Courtney Owen, and Claire McCasland 51 inches tall, 17 inches wide Is the cone tall enough for Edgecalibur? Let’s see...


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