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By, Bonnie Arena, Elementary Special Education Teacher July, 2009 For All About Money Unit.

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Presentation on theme: "By, Bonnie Arena, Elementary Special Education Teacher July, 2009 For All About Money Unit."— Presentation transcript:

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2 By, Bonnie Arena, Elementary Special Education Teacher July, 2009 For All About Money Unit

3 A U.S. coin worth one cent Can be written 1¢ or $0.01 Named after the British penny Copper plated; smooth edge First penny was printed in 1787 Designed by Benjamin Franklin; it had an “Indian Head” Lincoln penny first issued in 1909, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth; this was the, first coin to picture a President

4 Front of Penny Abraham Lincoln—16th President of the United States “In God We Trust”; “Liberty” Year coin was minted Mint mark (D means Denver, S means San Francisco and P means Philadelphia)

5 Back of Penny Lincoln Memorial, located in Washington D.C. If you look closely you can see a tiny picture of Lincoln sitting inside the Lincoln Memorial. “United States of America”; “One Cent”; “E Pluribus Unum”=”Out of many, one”

6 U.S. coin worth five cents/ five pennies; Can be written 5¢ or $0.05 Made out of a mixture of nickel and copper; smooth edge Was an “Indian Head/Buffalo” nickel until 1938 when it became the Jefferson nickel

7 Front of Nickel Thomas Jefferson—3rd President of the United States and principal author of the Declaration of Independence “In God We Trust”; “Liberty” Year coin was minted Mint mark

8 Back of Nickel Monticello—Jefferson’s house, which was designed by Jefferson himself “E Pluribus Unum”; “Monticello”; “Five Cents”; “United States of America” Utah State Office of Education/Utah State University

9 U.S. coin worth ten cents/ ten pennies/two nickels; can be written 10¢ or $0.10 Before 1965, was made out of silver; now made out of nickel/copper mixture; 188 ridges around the edge; smallest, thinnest and lightest U.S. coin Used to be the “Liberty Head “dime until 1946; now, the Roosevelt dime

10 Front of Dime Franklin Delano Roosevelt—32nd President; the only four-term President of the United States “Liberty”; “In God We Trust” Year coin was minted Mint mark

11 Back of Dime Torch with an olive branch to the left and an oak branch to the right Torch signifies liberty Oak branch signifies strength and independence Olive branch signifies peace “United States of America”; “E Pluribus Unum”; “One dime”

12 U.S. coin worth twenty-five cents/ twenty-five pennies/five nickels/ two dimes and one nickel; can be written 25¢ or $0.25 Made out of copper and nickel; before 1965 it was also made out of silver Edge has 119 has ridges George Washington quarter replace the Liberty quarter in 1932 There will be 50 state quarters, honoring each state’s history, traditions and symbols

13 Front of Quarter George Washington—First President of the United States “Liberty”; “In God We Trust” “Quarter Dollar”; and “United States of America” Year coin was minted Mint mark

14 Back of Quarter Presidential coat of arms (an eagle with outstretched wings) “United States of America”; “E Pluribus Unum”; “Quarter Dollar” Discuss the quarters with the different state drawings. Show students a few quarters with different drawings on them.

15 Go to the website for NIEHS Kids’ Pages and read about the dollar bill. $ $

16 References Coin images retrieved July 11, 2009 from : 1.jpg and quarter-back.png?w=300&h= jpghttp://scavenging.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/us- quarter-back.png?w=300&h=296 Coin Information. Academy Handbook First Grade. Utah State Office of Education/Utah State University. Retrieved July 11, 2009 from: coin_information.pdf coin_information.pdf National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences National Institutes of Health (NIH) Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Retrieved July 11, 2009 from:


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