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Presentation provided by the Volusia County Fire Chief’s Training Committee.

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Presentation on theme: "Presentation provided by the Volusia County Fire Chief’s Training Committee."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presentation provided by the Volusia County Fire Chief’s Training Committee

2 This training is designed as a supplement to established standard operating safety procedures and guidelines provided by your fire department. At the end of this training you should be able to recognize potential hazardous situations often encountered while driving emergency apparatus. During this training, take the time to discuss: -Importance of employing defensive driving tactics while operating department apparatus. -Department S.O.G.’s regarding operation of Fire Department apparatus. PLEASE ENSURE YOUR COMPUTER’S SOUND IS UP AND YOU ARE CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET

3 Fire Department Vehicle Fatalities

4 A study by the U.S. Fire administration shows 8 factors leading to crashes Insufficient Training Insufficient experience Overconfidence Excessive speed Inability to recognize danger signs Failure to follow department SOG Disobeying traffic laws Failure of civilians to yield NIOSH report: 1 dead: Recommendation- drive at a safe and reasonable speed!

5 The study continues to show the following driving fatality statistics: 21% die while driving tankers 20% die while driving engines 42% die while driving personal vehicles Driver of tanker is 3 times more likely to die than the passenger. Majority of crashes occur between noon-6pm. 73% of the time, the victim was not wearing seat belt. NIOSH report: 1 dead: Recommendation-drive at a safe and reasonable speed!

6 This was a 17 year old volunteer driving a tanker from the station to a brush fire approximately 3 miles away. He had gone through EVOC and was not responding with lights and siren. A police car witnessed the tankers rear wheel leaving the pavement and the driver lost control and flipped. He was wearing his seat belt but was partially ejected and was crushed. It is thought that he was reaching for the radio which was 22 inched from the steering wheel.

7 While responding for a medical call, a Captain who was not wearing his seat belt was ejected through the windshield and landed in oncoming traffic. NIOSH Recommendation #1. Fire departments should ensure that drivers of emergency fire apparatus adequately reduce their speed to maintain vehicle control and proceed with caution through intersections. Recommendation #2. Fire departments should ensure that all fire fighters riding in emergency fire apparatus are wearing and belted securely by seat belts. The funeral was held 6 days later.

8 As a Driver, do you always have both hands on the steering wheel? As the Driver, have you ever……. Put medical gloves on while driving? Talked on the Cell phone? As the Lieutenant, have you ever……. Stopped your driver from talking on the phone? Told your driver to slow down? NIOSH report: 1 dead: vehicle rolled-over victim not wearing seat belt. Improperly secured water tank!

9 Again, as a Driver, do you always have both hands on the steering wheel? NIOSH report: 1 drowned: Catastrophic blow-out of tire. If you are a Lieutenant, or acting as a Lieutenant, and your driver does not have both hands on the steering wheel, ask yourself: “Am I responsible for the actions of the driver?” As the supervisor, you have been placed in the position of authority and responsibility: You must set the safety standard!

10 This 23 year old firefighter died while riding in the jump seat. The crash occurred during non- emergency response in heavy rain. Recommendation #1: Fire departments should ensure that drivers are trained to carefully consider the use of auxiliary braking systems while operating apparatus on wet or potentially slippery roads. Who was ultimately responsible to ensure the switch was off during wet conditions?

11 Failure to properly establish a temporary traffic zone places firefighters in a dangerous position. Photo Bob Esposito, Pennsburg, PA. A DOT report indicates that approximately 18% of all traffic fatalities nationwide are the result of secondary collisions.

12 Request traffic assistance Block The scene to protect personnel Block an additional lane Block with pump panel “down stream” Block the highest traffic volume first Turn off headlights when not necessary for scene lighting Always wear class 3 vest/PPE Traffic cones at 15’ interval Provide overall scene lighting Last cone 150’ upstream Flagger as needed Safe Parking “Cue Card” as outlined in the Volusia County Fire Chiefs MOG.

13 Recommended vehicle placement as outlined in the Volusia County Fire Chiefs MOG.

14 This was a single car accident 150’ in front of ladder truck shown. Car 2 hit the ladder truck protecting the initial scene. Car 3 hit while rescue crews were assisting the victim of car 2, throwing the Captain 47’ in front of ladder truck. Car 4 hit while rescue personnel were treating the victims and trying to protect the airway of the Captain.

15 Diagram of scene

16 Unfortunately, this could happen to you. Don’t let a failure to provide scene safety be the cause. Don’t let your driving be the cause. Unfortunately, this could happen to your firefighter.

17 This is a 10 minute YouTube video link about a 911 call after a fire truck crashed. Click on link and end PowerPoint to view video

18 References: Lt Jim Jollie Edgewater Fire


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