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Do-Now Presentations of creative writing assignments… Sportscasters and Historians Monday, February 23 rd Agenda Do-Now Introduction to Sectionalism v.

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Presentation on theme: "Do-Now Presentations of creative writing assignments… Sportscasters and Historians Monday, February 23 rd Agenda Do-Now Introduction to Sectionalism v."— Presentation transcript:

1 Do-Now Presentations of creative writing assignments… Sportscasters and Historians Monday, February 23 rd Agenda Do-Now Introduction to Sectionalism v. Nationalism Reading comprehension worksheetsHomework As modeled in class, use your reading comprehension guides to read Chapter 8, Section 1

2 Sectionalism Regional Economies Create Differences

3 President James Madison ► 4 th President  2 consecutive terms  (1809-1817)  Continued the VA dynasty ► Promoted American society

4 Repercussions of War ► Highlighted the need for a national bank  exposed the weakness of the American financial system ► Brought attention to inadequate American infrastructure ► Stimulated Industry  International trade had become difficult to impossible during the war

5 Sectionalism (or Regionalism) ► Sectionalism:  Devotion to one’s state or region  Pride, priority, and personal interest in your region over the nation as a whole ► New technology emphasizes regional differences  North: Industrialized  South: Slave based society  West: Frontiersmen, wilderness

6 Nationalism ► Nationalism  Devotion to one’s country or nation  Priority lies in the nation as a whole, not the individual regions

7 SectionalismNationalism

8 Example Pages 272 – 276, two sections Section Title and page # and your prediction about what you’re about to read Pg 272 – The Industrial Revolution I think this section will be about… Paraphrase: Briefly summarize the information in this section The industrial revolution… Specifics… My Thoughts: i.e. “This reminds me of…” “I still don’t understand…” “I’m still wondering…” This one’s about making a personal connection, questioning, analyzing List important dates, names, laws, policies from this section Think… what information, in this section, would I likely see on a test? Include important names, dates, events and themes.

9 Homework ► Chapter 8, Section 1 ► Read carefully and use your reading charts to organize the information from pages 272-276, the first two red headings. You should complete at least 2 of the charts provided (you may use more than 2 if you’d prefer). ► Think about it…  What information in the reading might have contributed to the regional divisions we know today?

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11 Do-Now Discussion of “Connections” from last night’s homework Write a 1 paragraph summary of what we learned yesterday in class. Make sure to define “Sectionalism” and “Nationalism” in your own words. Tuesday, February 24 th Agenda Do-Now NotesHomework CONTINUED FROM YESTERDAY As modeled in class, use your reading comprehension guides to complete Chapter 8, Section 1

12 Make a prediction… We know what examples of sectionalism exist today, but how did these differences come about?

13 What is an Industrial Revolution?

14 Changes in Technology MACHINES Individual Craftsmanship ► Manufacturing becomes the basis for the economy ► Factory System  Interchangeable parts  Mass production  Cheaper, faster, more efficient ► INDUSTRIALIZATION a.k.a. Industrial Revolution

15 The roots of change ► Began in GB ► Inventors create new ways to generate power  used water and coal ► Technology “crosses the pond”  Samuel Slater, 1793, Pawtucket, RI ► War turned American focus toward domestic manufacturing  Takes the place of international trade  b/c of embargo, blockades

16 Slater’s Mill was a good start, but it only produced the thread… ► New technology is needed to complete the process…  1813 Francis C. Lowell, Nathan Appleton and Patrick T. Jackson’s mechanized weaving factory in Waltham, MA  Later turned Lowell, MA into an industrial center

17 Local History! ► The old red mill at Clinton, NJ  Built 1812 to process wool  Eventually used for grist milling, plaster and talc grinding, graphite processing, and peach- basket production  An example of harmony between man’s needs and nature’s possibilities ► Even MORE local  Allaire and Batsto Village  Also industrial towns

18 Factories

19 The “North” ► These industrial changes were associated primarily with the North ► But change was happing in the southern states, as well…

20 The “South” ► Also affected by the industrial revolution…

21 Eli Whitney & his Cotton ‘Gin ► Inventor, experimented with interchangeable parts (assembly systems) ► Made cotton production profitable with his “Cotton Gin” ► Suddenly, much more cotton could be processed in much less time.

22 click for animated patent drawing

23 How would this change the Southern States?...

24 Effects of the Cotton Gin ► Slavery became even more important to the South ► Demand for profitable cotton rises

25 “King Cotton & The Peculiar Institution” ► Yield of raw cotton doubled each decade after 1800. ► Fueled by other machines of the revolution  spinning and weaving machines, and steamboats to transport it ► Most cotton was shipped out to be manufactured into cloth.  At mid century the South provided 3/5ths of America's exports -- most of it in cotton. ► Increased the need for slaves to pick the cotton.  In 1790 there were 6 slave states; in 1860 there were 15. ► From 1790 until 1808 (when Congress banned the importation of slaves from Africa), Southerners imported 80,000 Africans.  By 1860 approximately 1 in 3 Southerners was a slave.

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27 What about the “Old Northwest”? ► Also became a farming society, but the sorts of crops grown in this region (OH, IN, IL, WI, MI) did not require as much labor to grow  Therefore not much need for slavery

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29 Do-Now Take out your packets from yesterday, we’ll begin by finishing the notes. Wednesday, February 25 th Agenda HW check Finish notes from yesterday “Big questions” worksheet American System Advertisement American System AdvertisementHomework MAYBE: Finish your American System Advertisement

30 A need to unify… ► Henry Clay (remember him?)  Speaker of the house  Saw a need to unite the different regions of the US and create a strong, stable economy that would make the US self-sufficient ► Supported President Madison’s wish to unify the nation, called it “The American System” “The American System”

31 The American System ► Develop transportation systems and other internal improvements ► Establish a protective tariff ► Resurrect the national bank (established during Washington’s administration under Hamilton’s guidance, but then diminished by Jefferson)

32  Railroads First steam locomotive in the US in 1825 – better for weather, all terrain, faster  Roads turnpikes had tolls to pay for themselves national road from Maryland to Illinois Improved Infrastructure

33 The Erie Canal http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23GDoyaxIig&feature=related

34 The Erie Canal One example of an “Internal Improvement” to transportation was the Erie Canal “The Big Ditch” stretched 363 miles. Linked the Hudson River to Lake Erie (Atlantic to Great Lakes). A great success, it inspired many more canals.

35 Canals v. Roads http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23GDoyaxIig&feature=related

36 Tariffs and the National Bank ► Tariff of 1816  tax on imported goods ► Tariffs further divided the regions…  Most Northerners approved, Southerners resented the increased price of imports ► Proposed by Madison and Clay to protect the value of American goods  Made imports unaffordable  Would help pay for roads, canals, lighthouses

37 B.U.S. Bank of the United States ► Most regions approved ► A Second National Bank would:  regulate a nationwide currency ► In 1816, Congress chartered the 2 nd BUS for a 20 year period

38 Local History In June 1834,Congress appropriated $6,000 for construction of a lighthouse at the north end of Long Beach Island. Then a 40-foot tower, Barnegat Lighthouse was put into commission in 1835. It's non-flashing, 5th-class light was soon deemed inadequate by mariners of the day, so in 1855, Lt. George G. Meade, a government engineer, was assigned to design a new lighthouse. Meade, an 1835 West Point graduate, had recently designed Absecon Lighthouse, but he earned his place in history in the War between the States. Promoted to brigadier general, Meade defeated General Lee in the Battle of Gettysburg. Encroaching seas threatened the original lighthouse so its light was installed atop a temporary wooden tower in June 1857 and the original lighthouse fell into the sea later that year. Meade submitted his construction plans in 1855 and construction began in late 1856. The new tower would be four times as tall as the previous and cost about $40,000. It was built about 100 feet south of the original because erosion in the inlet remained a problem. Barnegat Light, the second tallest lighthouse in the United States, was commissioned January 1, 1859. It remained a first-class navigational light until August 1927, when the tower's light was reduced over 80 per cent, but it was not extinguished until January 1944. In June 1834,Congress appropriated $6,000 for construction of a lighthouse at the north end of Long Beach Island. Then a 40-foot tower, Barnegat Lighthouse was put into commission in 1835. It's non-flashing, 5th-class light was soon deemed inadequate by mariners of the day, so in 1855, Lt. George G. Meade, a government engineer, was assigned to design a new lighthouse. Meade, an 1835 West Point graduate, had recently designed Absecon Lighthouse, but he earned his place in history in the War between the States. Promoted to brigadier general, Meade defeated General Lee in the Battle of Gettysburg. Encroaching seas threatened the original lighthouse so its light was installed atop a temporary wooden tower in June 1857 and the original lighthouse fell into the sea later that year. Meade submitted his construction plans in 1855 and construction began in late 1856. The new tower would be four times as tall as the previous and cost about $40,000. It was built about 100 feet south of the original because erosion in the inlet remained a problem. Barnegat Light, the second tallest lighthouse in the United States, was commissioned January 1, 1859. It remained a first-class navigational light until August 1927, when the tower's light was reduced over 80 per cent, but it was not extinguished until January 1944. Barnegat Lighthouse Barnegat Light, Long Beach Island Barnegat Light, Long Beach Island

39 American Plan Advertisement You’re Hired! ► Needed: advertising executives to promote Clay’s and Madison’s “American System” for the good of the nation ► Your advertisements should explain all three parts of the plan and include a catchy slogan or jingle along with at least one graphic to catch the public’s interest. ► Persuade the public that these changes are a great idea, build support for the program and the president! Advertising Executives earn a 15 pt. homework grade these days DUE FRIDAY


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