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General Education Reform Through the Lens of Student Success Tony Ciccone Bill Keith Jeff Merrick Dev Venugopalan.

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Presentation on theme: "General Education Reform Through the Lens of Student Success Tony Ciccone Bill Keith Jeff Merrick Dev Venugopalan."— Presentation transcript:

1 General Education Reform Through the Lens of Student Success Tony Ciccone Bill Keith Jeff Merrick Dev Venugopalan

2 Overview 1.What is student success? 2.How is Integrative Learning Different from General Education? 3.How can Integrative Learning improve student success?

3 1. Student Success Tablework 1 What are the dimensions of SS? What are the signs/signals of SS? What do successful students get out of their educations?

4 Snapshot of the Current General Education Program

5 Arts Cultural Diversity English CompositionHumanities Mathematical Skills Natural Sciences Social Sciences College of Engineering and Applied Science 498 College of Nursing 972 Global Studies 415 College of Health Sciences ,026 College of Letters and Science ,91621,3414,74222,77226,771 Peck School of the Arts9,102 School of Architecture and Urban Planning School of Information Studies 241 School of Education Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 1,774 Headcount Enrollment in GER Courses By Type and School/College

6 Arts Cultural Diversity English CompositionHumanities Mathematical Skills Natural Sciences Social Sciences College of Engineering and Applied Science 1,494 College of Nursing 3,232 Global Studies 1,245 College of Health Sciences 861 2,8383,078 College of Letters and Science2, ,74860,72214,22678,03280,313 Peck School of the Arts26,414 School of Architecture and Urban Planning2, School of Information Studies 723 School of Education Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 5,322 Number of Credits Earned in GER Courses By Type and School/College

7 Arts Cultural Diversity English CompositionHumanities Mathematical Skills Natural Sciences Social Sciences College of Engineering and Applied Science 3 College of Nursing 2 Global Studies 3 College of Health Sciences College of Letters and Science Peck School of the Arts53 School of Architecture and Urban Planning2 2 School of Information Studies 2 School of Education Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 5 Number of GER Courses Offered By Type and School/College

8 100 Level200 Level300 Level400 Level500 Level600 Level College of Engineering and Applied Science3 College of Nursing11 Global Studies12 College of Health Sciences2172 College of Letters and Science Peck School of the Arts School of Architecture and Urban Planning4 School of Information Studies11 School of Education Helen Bader School of Social Welfare2 2 1 Number of GER Courses offered By Level and School/College

9 CollegeCourse L&SCollege Writing and Research L&SIntermediate Algebra L&SIntroduction to Psychology L&SPrinciples of Microeconomics L&SPrinciples of Macroeconomics L&SSurvey-Calc/Analytic Geometry L&SIntroduction to Sociology L&SChemical Science L&SPublic Speaking Of the 440 GER courses offered in , the above nine courses (2%), accounted for 21% of the student enrollment in GER courses In the same year, 80% of the student enrollment in GER courses came from 31% of the GER courses offered. Most Popular GER Courses (Enrollment)

10 CollegeCourse L&SCollege Writing and Research L&SIntermediate Algebra L&SIntroduction to Psychology L&SPrinciples of Microeconomics L&SPrinciples of Macroeconomics L&SSurvey-Calc/Analytic Geometry L&SIntroduction to Sociology L&SChemical Science Of the 440 GER courses offered in , the above eight courses (1.8%), accounted for 20% of the total credits earned in GER courses In the same year, 80% of the credits earned in GER courses came from 27% of the GER courses offered. Most Popular GER Courses (Credits)

11 Student Success (con’t) Tablework 2 In what ways does the current Gen Ed system help student success? In what ways does the current Gen Ed system hinder student success?

12 2. Integrative Learning History of the IL revision process Components: Essential Learning Outcomes Competencies Breadth

13 AAC&U Essential Learning Outcomes Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts Focused by engagement with big questions, both contemporary and enduring Intellectual and Practical Skills, Including Inquiry and analysis Critical and creative thinking Written and oral communication Quantitative literacy Information literacy Teamwork and problem solving Practiced extensively, across the curriculum, in the context of progressively more challenging problems, projects, and standards for performance Personal and Social Responsibility, Including Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global Intercultural knowledge and competence Ethical reasoning and action Foundations and skills for lifelong learning Anchored through active involvement with diverse communities and real-world challenges Integrative and Applied Learning, Including Synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies Demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities to new settings and complex problems

14 UWM faculty survey

15 AAC&U employer survey % of employers who say colleges should place more emphasis than they do today on selected learning outcomes: The ability to effectively communicate orally and in writing 89 Critical thinking and analytical reasoning skills 81 The ability to apply knowledge and skills to real-world settings through internships or other hands-on experiences 79 The ability to analyze and solve complex problems 75 The ability to connect choices and actions to ethical decisions 75 Teamwork skills and the ability to collaborate with others in diverse group settings 71 The ability to innovate and be creative 70 Concepts and new developments in science and technology 70 The ability to locate, organize, and evaluate information from multiple sources 68 The ability to understand the global context of situations and decisions 67 Global issues and developments and their implications for the future 65 The ability to work with numbers and understand statistics 63 The role of the United States in the world 57 Cultural diversity in America and other countries 57 Civic knowledge, civic participation, and community engagement 52 Proficiency in a foreign language 45 Democratic institutions and values 40

16 General Education and Integrative Learning: Breadth BreadthUWML&SCore Knowledge and skills Arts3 crsameCreative Arts 3 cr Humanities6 cr12 crEthics, Values, and Human Behavior 3cr Natural Sciences6 cr12 crGlobal and International studies 3 cr Social Sciences6 cr12 crHistory, Society and Politics 3 cr Cultural Diversity3 crsamePhysical and Life Sciences 6-7 cr International9 crRace, Ethnicity and Diversity in US 3 cr Textual Analysis and Interpretation 3 cr Maximum24 cr39 cr24-25 cr 3 cr Exploratory; 3 cr advanced 6 cr maximum per curricular area

17 General Education and Integrative Learning: Competencies CompetencyUWML&SILAdditional credits English Composition English 102 sameOral and Written Communication A (same) 3 cr & B, 3 cr 0 (A through placement & B through CKS course) to 6 Mathematical Skills Math 105, 106, 175 Same + logic or statistics Quantitative Literacy A (same) & B, 3 cr 0 (A through placement & B through CKS course) to 6 Foreign Language 2 semesters BA, 4 sem same0 (through placement) to 6 Information Literacy Information Literacy A, B, C 0 (through other courses) to 3 (L&I SCI 210

18 Core Knowledge Areas Creative Arts (3 cr) Ethics, Values and Human Behavior (3 cr) Global and International Studies (3 cr) History, Society, and Politics (3 cr) Physical and Life Sciences (6-7 cr) Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity in the U.S. (3 cr) Textual Analysis and Interpretation (3 cr

19 Proposals for IL courses will provide a rationale for the course’s inclusion in the CKS area, explaining its foundational nature (how it differs from disciplinary courses and addresses questions about large intellectual, social, cultural, and/or scientific topics/issues; include at least THREE Essential Learning Outcomes from the list of ten below; specify the assignment or activity through which the student achieves each ELO; describe the assessment process to be used for reporting achievement of outcomes.

20 Integrative Learning E(essential) L(earning) O(outcomes) Critical thinking Inquiry and analysis Problem solving and teamwork Creative thought and expression Oral and written communication Information literacy Intercultural knowledge and competence Civic knowledge and engagement Ethical reasoning Integrative applied learning

21 3. Integrative Learning and Student Success When/where could IL promote student success? When you advise/recruit students In IL courses themselves Understanding purposes of college education Creating motivation/meaning Connections to co-curricular and extra- curricular activities and resources


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