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What the BLEEP is LEAP? Kim Rotundo Registrar Northern Michigan University Theresa Jacques Registrar Michigan Technological University.

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Presentation on theme: "What the BLEEP is LEAP? Kim Rotundo Registrar Northern Michigan University Theresa Jacques Registrar Michigan Technological University."— Presentation transcript:

1 What the BLEEP is LEAP? Kim Rotundo Registrar Northern Michigan University Theresa Jacques Registrar Michigan Technological University

2 What does LEAP stand for? A)Law Enforcement Against Prohibition B)Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning C)Lansing Economic Area Partnership D)Liberal Education and America’s Promise

3 Four Cornerstones of LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes High Impact Practices Principles of Excellence Meaningful Assessment

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5 High Impact Practices Teaching and learning strategies that have proven to be beneficial for college students from many backgrounds First-Year Seminars Common Intellectual Experiences Learning Communities Writing-Intensive Courses Collaborative Assignments and Projects Undergraduate Research Diversity/Global Learning Community-Based Learning Internships Capstone Courses and Projects

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7 Meaningful Assessment Should be integrated as a regular practice across the institution Faculty/Instructors need to be part of the process Academic departments should be assessing their own courses/programs/learning outcomes Holistic approach Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) Rubrics VALUE rubrics tie back to the LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes Intended to be a starting point and can be modified

8 LEAP Resources About LEAP https://www.aacu.org/leap LEAP Campus Toolkit Essential Learning Outcomes https://www.aacu.org/leap/essential-learning-outcomes High Impact Practices https://www.aacu.org/leap/hips Principles of Excellence https://www.aacu.org/leap/principles-of-excellence Assessment/VALUE Rubrics https://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics

9 A LEAP state? Intentional work toward systemic change We agree to embrace and value the principles of LEAP Not required to build programs around it Could be different for each institution Required to have a State-wide project that all schools participate in still under discussion, but ours may be in the area of assessment State-wide committee is in place; working through the application process Need support and momentum from community colleges Liberal/general education Seamless transition for transfer Potential impacts of being a LEAP state Transfer credit Degree requirements

10 Michigan Tech’s Approach Learning Goals were defined using the LEAP ELOs as a starting point and modified to fit our University goals Disciplinary Knowledge Knowledge of the Physical and Natural World Global Literacy Critical and Creative Thinking Communication (Written and Oral) Information Literacy Technology Social Responsibility and Ethical Reasoning Goals align with the University’s strategic plan and professional accreditation outcomes (ABET, AACSB, SAF).

11 Learning Goals Incorporated into Curriculum Each learning goal has a committee Rubrics were created/modified Learning goals were designated as a general education goal, a degree program goal (sometimes both), or student affairs goal All courses in the general education program have a learning goal attached to them Assigned at the course level, not the section level Tracked using course attributes (Banner) Departments select the goal they wish to have on their course Instructors identify an assignment to be used for assessment Student names are randomly picked for assessment We assess a different learning goal each academic year Assessed by the Learning Goal committee Faculty and instructors are invited to participate in the process

12 Northern Michigan University Process to develop new LEAP-based General Education program

13 History Traditional General Education Program – called Liberal Studies 6 divisions, 10 classes, 40 credits Oversight by an Academic Senate Subcommittee Reviewed one division per year Requests for changes were brought to the Liberal Studies Subcommittee, voted on, and brought to Academic Senate for a full vote Several attempts to make programmatic/structural changes with no success

14 …And then came AQIP In preparation of AQIP visit, NMU brought in a consultant Number one issue for consultant was our General Education program Not outcomes based Not monitored in any meaningful way Current oversight structure does not allow for any meaningful change

15 Next Steps Utilizing the consultant’s report, a change in Liberal Studies oversight was proposed to Academic Senate Dissolve the Liberal Studies committee and form a General Education Council (GEC) GEC would be a subcommittee of Academic Senate, but would NOT need Senate approval to manage program Senate would approve the structure of the program, but would not approve rubrics and specific courses.

16 General Education Council Arts & Sciences RepresentativeElected Arts & Sciences RepresentativeElected Health Sciences and Professional Studies RepresentativeElected Health Sciences and Professional Studies RepresentativeElected Business/AIS RepresentativeElected At Large Faculty RepresentativeElected At Large Faculty RepresentativeElected Associate Dean for General Education & RetentionAppointed Director of Institutional Assessment & AccreditationAppointed RegistrarAppointed

17 Research and Resources Conferences Best Practices Models being implemented at other schools Decision to go with a LEAP based program

18 Campus Involvement/Buy-In Campus forum in late January, 2014 Surveys/Input/Revisions Campus forum in late March, 2014 Proposal to Academic Senate in April, 2014 Outline of program passed in April, 2014 (Implementation date, Fall 2016) Workshops in September and October, 2014

19 Model A: Outcomes Driven

20 Critical Thinking, Creative Thinking and Problem Solving (2 courses) Effective Communication (2 courses) Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis (2 courses) Ethical Reasoning and Consequences of Decision Making (2 courses) Intercultural Competence/Diverse World (2 courses) Integrative Learning (2 courses) Courses may be at any level. Courses in the program may satisfy up to TWO Learning Outcomes; courses may only satisfy ONE outcome. Students must complete TWO courses that satisfy each outcome. Students may not use more than two courses with the same prefix. Students may double count courses with courses required by majors and minors. Two courses implies minimum of 9 credits. Learning Outcomes

21 Overview This model requires students to select courses that represent six Learning Outcomes with requirements for the number of courses in each area. Each course in the program would meet 1-2 Learning Outcomes. Learning Outcomes would be assessed by LEAP-type rubrics. There are no specific requirements for disciplines in this model; however, educational breadth is maintained by a limit on the number of courses that can be selected from each discipline (i.e. prefix). There are no upper level course requirements in this model, but courses can be at any level. The major benefits to this model are the complete focus on Learning Outcomes while maximizing student and department choice. Rationale This model is all about Learning Outcomes, which are the focus of best practices (LEAP) and accreditation (HLC). The selected Learning Outcomes are not tied to disciplines and this model recognizes that these core understandings can be achieved in many different types of courses. The model does recognize that it is important for students to undertake learning in a variety of fields, but it does not proscribe how this diversity of learning experiences should be structured. This model does not favor any discipline (or department) over others and reflects a complete change from our existing Liberal Studies program. This model maximizes the choice available to students and also maximizes flexibility of learning outcomes choice available to departments/courses. This model is relatively simple making advising straightforward. This model does not have explicit links to the Michigan Transfer Agreement; however, some similar courses would be required through the maintenance of our existing University Requirements. This lack of linkage reflects the concept that NMU is not required to match the MTA and perhaps should remain independent of this agreement. This model does not require students to take any specific courses (e.g. math, composition, science, art) risking some knowledge gaps, but allowing students to choose areas of interest. The model assumes that taking two courses in each of the Learning Outcomes is sufficient for competency in each area. This model does not require an upper level course and instead relies on the major to ensure in-depth learning in a specific content area.

22 Model B: Outcomes & Experiences

23 Human Experience (3 courses) Social & Cultural Studies (3 courses) STEM (3 courses) LEARNING OUTCOMES LEARNING EXPERIENCES Critical Thinking, Creative Thinking and Problem Solving 3 courses (9 credits min) Effective Communication 2 courses (6 credits min) Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis 2 courses (6 credits min) Ethical Reasoning and Consequences of Decision Making 1 courses (3 credits min) Intercultural Competence/Diverse World 2 courses (6 credits min) Integrative Learning 1 course (3 credits min) must have Jr/Sr standing Lower Level Courses ( only): 9 courses Upper Level Course ( only): 1 course Student must meet both Learning Outcome and Learning Experience requirements. Each Gen Ed course will address at least one and not more than two Learning Outcomes. Each Gen Ed course will address one Learning Experience (except upper level). No restrictions on double counting within program, into major, or by discipline/prefix. Lower level courses will need to meet simple, but clear, criteria for inclusion in a Learning Experience category. Upper level course can be from any discipline and would not need to have an identified Learning Experience area. Upper level course must be at the level and students would need to have reached the junior level to take it.

24 Overview This model requires students to select courses that represent three Learning Experiences as well as six Learning Outcomes with requirements for the number of courses in each area. Each course in the program would meet one Learning Experience and 1-2 Learning Outcomes. Learning Outcomes would be assessed by LEAP-type rubrics while membership in a Learning Experience would be determined by simple criteria based on content area of the course. This model includes a requirement for an upper level, integrative (interdisciplinary) course. The major benefits to this model are a focus on Learning Outcomes while ensuring educational breadth and maximizing student and department flexibility. Rationale This model is focused on specific learning outcomes drawn from LEAP and identified as important by the campus and best practices, but it also emphasized broad disciplinary representation. All students would engage with each of these learning outcomes; however, they might do this in vastly different course contexts. It requires disciplinary breadth through the Learning Experience requirements, ensuring that all students receive some training in these three major learning areas. It does not require any specific discipline’s courses and allows students substantial flexibility in selecting courses which we believe is desired by students. This model also allows departments maximum flexibility in the Learning Outcomes that they wish to address with their courses with no required links between a discipline and a specific Learning Outcome. The model includes an upper level, integrative course to encourage interdisciplinary thinking; these courses are not linked to any discipline and may allow development of creative new options. This model, coupled with existing University Requirements, aligns well with the Michigan Transfer Agreement such that our students would achieve a similar mix of courses, though less restricted by discipline, to what transfers with the MTA stamp could bring in to NMU. This model requires the students to double count within the program and allows them to double count between the program and the majors if needed; however overdoubling is prevented by rules placed on the courses (only one Learning Experience and no more than two Learning Outcomes per course). There are no limits on the number of courses a student could apply from a single department. One potential issue with this model is that it is somewhat complicated (because it essentially has two requirements lists to choose courses from) which makes advising more challenging; we think that CAPP will make this manageable. It does not include a specific requirement for any particular composition course, although effective communication does specifically include written communication. It will require the development of criteria to determine how courses will be sorted into Learning Experiences (we do not recommend doing this by course prefix in this model, but rather by course content).

25 Model C: Blended Skills & Content

26 Effective Communication (2 courses) LO: Critical & Creative Thinking and Problem Solving LO: Effective Communication Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis (1 course) LO: Quantitative Reasoning LO: Critical & Creative Thinking and Problem Solving Human Expression (2 courses) LO: Critical & Creative Thinking and Problem Solving LO: Creative Thinking Criteria: Similar to Division II & VI disciplines Human Civilization and Social Responsibility (2 courses) LO: Critical & Creative Thinking and Problem Solving LO: Ethical Reasoning & Conseq Decision Making Criteria: Similar to Division IV disciplines Scientific Inquiry (2 courses) LO: Critical & Creative Thinking and Problem Solving LO: Scientific Inquiry/Method Criteria: Similar Division III disciplines Students select from each area; areas are divided into skills and content areas. Skills courses are defined by Learning Outcomes (LO) only while Content area courses meet both Learning Outcomes and Content Criteria (similar to current LS Divisions). The model does not allow for double counting within the program, however courses can be double counted back into the major. No more than two courses can come from the same prefix and/or department within the “Content” portion of the program. No upper division courses are required. Courses may be at any level. Easy transfer of courses from community colleges according to the MTA. Each course is intended to be at least 3 credits. Intercultural Competence/Diverse World (1 course) LO: Critical & Creative Thinking and Problem Solving LO: Intercultural Competence/ Diverse World EN 111 and 211 HP 200 and HP Elective Skills Content

27 Overview This “blended” model provides a mix of recommended skills and specific disciplinary content with continued emphasis on Learning Outcomes. Blended models like this have been used by other universities in an effort to move toward outcomes-based programs while providing specific directives for content. Students are required to take a certain number of courses in each of the categories. The major benefits of this model are the requirement for specific disciplinary breadth while ensuring assessable, well-supported Learning Objective are obtained. Rationale The blended model allows NMU to require disciplinary representation in the educational experience of students, ensuring that they will receive training in specific areas such as the Arts & Humanities, Science, and Social Sciences while also attaining certain critical skills (communication and quantitative analysis). Disciplinary breadth is further ensured by allowing no more than two courses with the same prefix to be used within the Content section of the program. This model requires all courses in General Education to explicitly address Critical Thinking/Creative Thinking/Problem Solving while other Learning Outcomes are distributed through the program. Courses in particular areas must meet the Learning Outcomes linked to their area, decreasing departmental choice. Student choice of disciplines is somewhat constrained. This program does not include an upper-level requirement and it does not include the Integrative Learning Outcome. It does require a new Learning Outcome rubric for Scientific Inquiry/Method. It also requires the application of disciplinary criteria for the Content sections and our expectation is that these would be similar to those required for entry into the current Liberal Studies Divisions. This model matches closely to the Michigan Transfer Agreement and is relatively close to our existing Liberal Studies program. It also allows double counting to the major courses, but does not allow any double counting within the program itself. The program is relatively simple and we believe that advising would be straightforward.

28 Two months later….

29 New General Education Learning Outcomes Demonstrates communication skills that express and convey ideas clearly and effectively Demonstrates interpretation of quantitative data leading to conclusions Demonstrates engagement with local or global cultural diversity Demonstrates integrative thinking by synthesizing disciplinary knowledge and applying this synthesis to new contexts Demonstrates analysis and evaluation of artistic, literary or rhetorical expression Demonstrates synthesis and analysis of major social issues within the context of human behavior, history, philosophy and ethics Demonstrates use of scientific processes to investigate and report knowledge about natural or social phenomena Demonstrates critical thinking EIGHT proposed learning outcomes All to be achieved by all students

30 Effective Communication (2 courses) Demonstrates communication skills that express and convey ideas clearly and effectively Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis (1 course) Demonstrates interpretation of quantitative data leading to conclusions Scientific Inquiry (2 courses) Demonstrates use of scientific processes to investigate and report knowledge about natural or social phenomena Social Responsibility in a Diverse World (1 course) Demonstrates engagement with local or global cultural diversity Human Expression (1 course) Demonstrates analysis and evaluation of artistic, literary or rhetorical expression Perspectives on society (2 courses) Demonstrates synthesis and analysis of major social issues within the context of human behavior, history, philosophy and ethics Integrative thinking (1 course) Demonstrates integrative thinking by synthesizing disciplinary knowledge and applying this synthesis to new contexts Rubric based on LEAP Creative Thinking, Written Communication, and Oral Communication GENERAL EDUCATION COMPONENTS Rubric based on LEAP Quantitative Reasoning and Problem Solving Rubric based on LEAP Ethical Reasoning, Consequences of Decision Making, Intercultural Competence and Diverse World Rubric based on LEAP Integrative Thinking Rubric based on LEAP Creative Thinking and elements of Artistic Evaluation Rubric based on LEAP Ethical Reasoning, Consequences of Decision Making Rubric based on LEAP Problem Solving and elements of Scientific Inquiry/Method * Courses in all components would also address Critical Thinking Learning Outcome PROPOSED GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM STRUCTURE

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32 All materials, forms, and resources:


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