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The effects of EMS Education Standards in the EMS classroom.

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Presentation on theme: "The effects of EMS Education Standards in the EMS classroom."— Presentation transcript:

1 The effects of EMS Education Standards in the EMS classroom

2  Define Educational Standard  Review the journey  Identify the components of the EMS Education Standards  Discuss the transition from NSC to SBE  Discuss ways to implement the Education Standards in the EMS Classroom

3  Level of quality or achievement  A measure  Definition body of knowledge  Defines competencies

4  1996 EMS Agenda for the Future  2000 EMS Education Agenda for the Future: A Systems Approach

5  Five integrated elements  National EMS Core Content  National EMS Scope of Practice  National EMS Education Standards  National EMS Certification  National EMS Program Accreditation  Additionally: Gap Analysis Education Guidelines

6  Replace DOT National Standard Curricula  Meet practice guidelines within the Scope of Practice  Contain concepts of the EMS Core Content  Define entry level  Competencies  Clinical behaviors  Judgments

7  Recognition of EMS as a healthcare profession !

8  DOT National Standard Curriculum  All levels of EMS Provider  Prescribed content curriculum  Lesson plans  Classroom activities  Hourly recommendations  Final assessment measures First Responder: National Standard Curriculum United States Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration United States Department of Health and Human Services Maternal and Child Health Bureau

9  Complexity of Prehospital Emergency care  Patient Criticality  Complexity of management options  Complexity of Prehospital Emergency care Education  Depth  Breadth  Student learning measured by “competencies”  Shift from instructor – teaching to student – learning

10  Traditional lesson planning  What content will I teach?  How will I teach it?  What materials will I need?  What assignment will I give the students?  What activities will I do in class?  What homework will I assign?  How will I test whether or not they learned it?  How will I grade it?  What is the next unit? Developed by the SBE Design Team, Northern Colorado BOCES, through a Partnership Goals 2000 Grant

11  Standards –based education approach  What is the content standard [competency]?  How will students show what they know and can do?  What essential learning or components do students need?  What teaching strategies work best ? Developed by the SBE Design Team, Northern Colorado BOCES, through a Partnership Goals 2000 Grant

12  Standards –based education approach (cont’d)  Are students developing knowledge and skills aligned to the standard?  What are the outcome measures?  What should be refined, revised, or retaught ?  Is change needed? Developed by the SBE Design Team, Northern Colorado BOCES, through a Partnership Goals 2000 Grant

13  Whereby learning is achieved through a process

14  Comprised of four components  Standard/Competency (yellow)  Required knowledge (blue)  Clinical behaviors/judgments (green)  Educational infrastructure (white)

15 Table 2: Format of National EMS Education Standards EMREMTAEMTParamedic Content Area Competency Elaboration of knowledge Additional knowledge related to the competency Additional knowledge related to the competency Additional knowledge related to the competency Additional knowledge related to the competency Clinical behaviors and judgments Clinical behaviors and judgments Clinical behaviors and judgments Clinical behaviors and judgments Educational Infrastructure Educational Infrastructure Educational Infrastructure Educational Infrastructure

16 EMREMTAEMTParamedic Special Patient Populations Recognizes and manages life threats based on simple assessment findings for a patient with special needs while awaiting additional emergency response. Applies a fundamental knowledge of growth, development, and aging and assessment findings to provide basic emergency care and transportation for a patient with special needs. Applies a fundamental knowledge of growth, development, and aging and assessment findings to provide basic and selected advanced emergency care and transportation for a patient with special needs. Integrates assessment findings with principles of pathophysiology and knowledge of psychosocial needs to formulate a field impression and implement a comprehensive treatment/dispo sition plan for patients with special needs..

17 EMREMTAEMTParamedic ObstetricsSimple depth, simple breadth Recognition and management of Normal delivery Vaginal bleeding in the pregnant patient EMR Material Plus: Fundamental depth, foundational breadth Anatomy and physiology of normal pregnancy Pathophysiology of complications of pregnancy Assessment of the pregnant patient Management of o Normal delivery o Abnormal delivery Nuchal cord Prolapsed cord Breech delivery o Third trimester bleeding Placenta previa Abruptio placenta o Spontaneous abortion/miscarriage o Ectopic pregnancy o Preeclampsia, Eclampsia Same as Previous Level AEMT Material Plus: Complex depth, comprehensive breadth Anatomy and physiology of pregnancy Pathophysiology of complications of pregnancy Assessment of the pregnant patient Psychosocial impact, presentations, prognosis, and management of Normal delivery Abnormal delivery Nuchal cord Prolapsed cord Breech Spontaneous abortion/miscarriage Ectopic pregnancy Eclampsia Antepartum hemorrhage Pregnancy induced Hypertension Cont’d……

18 EMR Perform a simple assessment to identify life threats (vaginal Bleeding), identify injuries requiring immobilization and conditions requiring treatment within the scope of practice of the EMR: including foreign substance in the eyes and nerve agent Poisoning Assisted normal delivery Bleeding control Initiates simple interventions based on assessment findings (Braxton Hicks) Assessment Psychomotor Skills Decision Making

19 Educational Infrastructure EMR/EMT Educational Facilities: Facility approved by sponsoring agency ADA compliant facility Sufficient space for class size Controlled environment Course length Course length is based on competency, not hours Course length is estimated to take approximately didactic and laboratory clock hours Program Evaluation Provide evaluation of program instructional effectiveness Provide evaluation of organizational and administrative effectiveness of program Student Space Provide space sufficient or students to attend classroom sessions, take notes and participate in kinematic learning and practice activities Student Assessment Perform knowledge, skill and professional behavior evaluations based on educational standards and program objectives Provide several methods of assessing achievement Provides assessment that measures, as a minimum, entry level competency in all domains Field Experience (EMT): The student must participate in and document patient contacts in a field experience approved by the medical director and program director Instructional Resources Provide basic instructional support material Provide audio, visual, and kinematic aids to support and supplement didactic instructions Hospital Experience (EMT): Students should observe emergency department operations for a period of time sufficient to gain an appreciation for the continuum of care. Students must perform ten patient assessments. These can be performed in an emergency department, ambulance, clinic, nursing home, doctor’s office, etc., or on standardized patients if clinical settings are not available

20  Stages in the Backward Design Process 1. Identify Desired Results 2. Determine acceptable evidence 3. Plan learning experiences and instruction

21  Step One:  Identify the standard  Step Two  Identify the assessment method and scoring criteria  Step Three  Develop the lesson plan and delivery method

22 Class: Content area (Standard) – Competencies:Prerequisite Knowledge – Elaboration Required Knowledge - Elaboration (lesson plan) Clinical Behaviors & Judgments Instructional Strategies (student- centered) Educational Infrastructure Assessment MeasuresBenchmarks

23 Class: Cardiovascular Emergencies Standards/Content area – Competencies:Prerequisite Knowledge – Elaboration Recognizes and manages life threats based on assessment findings of a patient with a medical emergency while awaiting additional emergency response. Uses assessment information to recognize shock, respiratory failure or arrest, and cardiac arrest based on assessment findings and manages the emergency while awaiting additional emergency response Scene Size up Primary Assessment History taking Secondary Assessment Reassessment Airway Management Vital Signs Pathophysiology of Shock & Respiratory compromise CPR/AED Therapeutic Communication techniques Documentation Required knowledge -Elaboration – (Lesson Plan) Clinical Behaviors & Judgments Simple depth and simple breadth Anatomy, signs, symptoms and management Chest pain (deeper discussion on CP & Heart attack) Cardiac arrest Perform a patient assessment and provide prehospital emergency care for patient complaints:  Cardiac arrest, chest pain  Manual CPR  AED  Decision making Instructional Planner

24 Cardiovascular – Cont’d Instructional Strategies (student- centered) Educational Infrastructure Classroom lecture Homework assignments Scenario discussion Role playing Skills lab for CPR, AED, V/S Sponsorship Programmatic Approval Faculty Medical Director Oversight Hospital/Clinical Experience Field Experience Course length Course Design Student Assessment Program Evaluation Assessment MeasuresBenchmarks Informal checks for understanding during lecture Observation of student engagement with directed dialogue Formative Quizzes Final Summative Exam Final Practical skills testing - CPR/AED scenario Students able to answer informal questioning Students awake, eye contact, note taking, asking questions Identified content questions - 80% accuracy Identified content questions – 80% accuracy Demonstrates ability to manage Chest pain – Cardiac Arrest patient scenario meeting all competencies Instructional Planner (Cont’d)

25 EMREMTAEMTParamedic AssessmentUse scene information and simple patient assessment to identify and manage immediate life threats and injuries within the scope of practice of the EMR Applies scene information and patient assessment findings (scene size up, primary and secondary assessment, patient history, and reassessment) to guide emergency management Same as previous level Integrate scene and patient assessment findings with knowledge of epidemiology and pathophysiology to form a field impression. This includes developing a list of differential diagnosis through clinical reasoning to modify the assessment and formulate a treatment plan

26 Class: Assessment (EMR) Standards/Content area – Competencies:Prerequisite Knowledge – Elaboration Use scene information and simple patient assessment to identify and manage immediate life threats and injuries within the scope of practice of the EMR Scene Size up History taking Therapeutic Communication techniques Documentation Elaboration - Required Knowledge (Lesson Plan) Clinical Behaviors & Judgments Primary Assessment: simple depth, simple breadth Primary assessment for all patient situations Level of consciousness ABCs Identify life threats Assessment of vital functions Begin interventions as needed to preserve life Secondary Assessment: Simple depth, simple breadth Performing a rapid full body scan Focused assessment of pain Assessment of Vital signs Perform simple Assessment to identify life threats Basic Airway Maneuvers Assessment Manual BP Instructional Planner

27 Instructional Strategies (student- centered)Educational Infrastructure Classroom lecture Homework assignments Scenario discussion Role playing Skills lab : patient assessment, BP, airway management Sponsorship Programmatic Approval Faculty Medical Director Oversight Hospital/Clinical Experience Field Experience Course length Course Design Student Assessment Program Evaluation Assessment MeasuresBenchmarks Informal checks for understanding during lecture Observation of student engagement with directed dialogue Formative Quizzes Final Summative Exam Final Practical skills testing - Assessment, Vital Signs Students able to answer informal questioning Students awake, eye contact, note taking, asking questions Identified content questions - 80% accuracy Identified content questions – 80% accuracy Demonstrates ability to do a patient assessment Instructional Planner (Cont’d)

28 Class: OB (EMR) Content area (Standard)– Competencies:Prerequisite Knowledge – Elaboration Recognizes and manages life threats based on simple assessment findings for a patient with special needs while awaiting additional emergency response. Assessment Airway Management Vital Signs Management of Shock (hemorrhagic) Communication Scene Management Required Knowledge – Elaboration (lesson plan)Clinical Behaviors & Judgments Obstetrics Simple depth, simple breadth Recognition and management of Normal delivery Vaginal bleeding in the pregnant patient Assessment Perform a simple assessment to identify life threats, identify injuries requiring immobilization and conditions requiring treatment within the scope of the EMR (Vaginal Bleeding ) Psychomotor Skills Assisted normal delivery Bleeding control Decision Making Initiates simple interventions based on assessment findings (Braxton Hicks)

29 Instructional Strategies (student- centered)Educational Infrastructure Interactive Classroom lecture Homework assignments Scenario discussion Role playing Skills lab for labor assessment and delivery Sponsorship Programmatic Approval Faculty Medical Director Oversight Hospital/Clinical Experience Field Experience Course length Course Design Student Assessment Program Evaluation Assessment MeasuresBenchmarks Informal checks for understanding during lecture Observation of student engagement with directed dialogue Formative Quizzes Final Summative Exam Final Practical skills testing - laboring patient w/excessive bleeding through to delivery Students able to answer informal questioning Students awake, eye contact, note taking, asking questions Identified content questions - 80% accuracy Identified content questions – 80% accuracy Meets criteria on skill sheet for scenario

30  1. Objectives  2. Elaboration/outline  3. Behavior/psychomotor skills  4. Class activities  5. Student outcome measures  6. Revisions

31 1. Objectives: At the completion of this module the student will:  Identify pertinent anatomy to the obstetric patient  Discuss physiological changes that occur with pregnancy  Discuss assessment of the pregnant patient  Discuss Stages of labor  Discuss true versus false labor Braxton Hicks  Discuss Vaginal bleeding  Discuss management of excessive vaginal bleeding 2. Elaboration/outline  Anatomy & Physiology  Physiological changes  Stages of labor  Patient assessment  Assessment of Labor  Vaginal bleeding  Delivery process  Patient Management Mother Newborn

32 3. Behavior/Psychomotor Skills  Patient assessment Laboring patient Post delivery New born Vaginal Bleeding  Airway management  Vital signs 4. Class Activities  Interactive lecture  Scenario based discussion  Lab practice w/ delivery manikin

33 5. Student outcome assessment measures  Quizzes/exam questions  Class discussion participation  Practical exam Laboring mom w/ excessive vaginal bleeding Laboring mom with normal delivery 6. Revision

34  Evaluate yourself and ask  Do my students understand what I expect them to know?  Does the content and teaching methods I am using match and work with the stated objectives and standard?  Do my quizzes, exams, psychomotor skill evaluations, clinical assessment tools provide a means to measure the objectives and standard?

35  If you answered yes to all – you are good to go  If you answered no to any of those questions something needs to be fixed. Either  Fix, add or delete  Change the content or methods  Modify the evaluation tools

36  Start with the standard  Identify measurable learning outcomes  Approach from “students’ perspective”  Develop approach to lesson/class  Measure outcomes  Adapt change as needed

37  It is a process  It will take time  Keep sight of the goal  Take the time  Start where you plan to end  Think like an assessor  Remember the student-centered approach

38  Terry DeVito    Capital Community College 950 Main St. Hartford, CT 06103

39 Drake, S., Burns,R. (2004). Meeting Standards Through integrated Curriculum. Alexandria, VA.: ASCD Publications. Marzano, R.(1996) Eight Questions about Implementing Standards-Based Education. Retrieved: 2/22/2009 from: NAEMSE (2006) Foundations of Education. Mosby, St. Louis, MO. NHTSA (2002) National Guidelines for Educating EMS Instructors. Schmoker,M., Marzano, R.(1999) the Promise of the Standards Movement. Retrieved 6/4/2010, from Sasson, D. (2008) Working with Education Standards. Retrieved 6/4/2010, from: plan-help.suite101.com/article.cfm/working_with_educational_standards United Sates Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration & United States Department of Health Resources & Services Administration, Maternal & Child Health Bureau (1996) Emergency Medical Services Agenda for the Future United Sates Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration & United States Department of Health Resources & Services Administration, Maternal & Child Health Bureau (2000) Emergency Medical Services Education Agenda for the Future

40  Schultz,D. (2005). Standards in the Classroom. Retrieved 6/4/2010. From:  Wiggins, G., McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Upper Saddle River, NJ.: Prentice Hall Publishing.  What are Academic Standards:  National EMS Scope of Practice Model:   EMS Education Agenda for the Future   2009 EMS Ed standards Gap Analysis Template  te.pdf te.pdf  National EMS Core Content   National EMS Education standards   Link to Instructor Guidelines 


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