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Teaching Strategy: Lecture By: Kelli Walker, Casey Walsh, & Tiffany Washington.

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Presentation on theme: "Teaching Strategy: Lecture By: Kelli Walker, Casey Walsh, & Tiffany Washington."— Presentation transcript:

1 Teaching Strategy: Lecture By: Kelli Walker, Casey Walsh, & Tiffany Washington

2 Broad Overview  Method: Lecture  Derived from the Latin word “lectura” which means “to read”.  “Highly structured method by which the teacher verbally transmits information directly to groups of learners for the purpose of instruction” (Fitzgerald, 2006, p. 321).  One of the oldest and most often used methods.  Efficient and cost-effective method for relaying large amounts of information to large amounts of people at the same time. Fitzgerald, 2006

3 Broad Overview  Lecture includes an introduction, body, and conclusion.  Introduction:  Learners are presented with an overview of the objectives and an explanation of why those objectives are significant.  Body:  Actual delivery of content.  May use audiovisual material (i.e. video, overhead, power point).  Conclusion  Review the major concepts presented in the lecture. Fitzgerald, 2006

4 Educational Theory  Cognitive Learning Theory  Focuses on what goes on “inside the learner such as their perceptions, thoughts, memory, and ways of processing and structuring information” (Braungart & Braungart, 2006, p. 43).  Jean Piaget is the best-known cognitive development theorist.  Piaget stages of cognitive development include: sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operations, and formal operations. Braungart & Braungart, 2006

5 Uses  Ways to apply the strategy:  To provide background information, summarizing data, and presenting the latest research findings on a particular topic.  To help students understand complicated or theoretical material.  To adapt to the individual learners cognitive needs and levels (translating words, using clarifying examples, and analogies).  Motivate students by showing personal interest in the topic and presenting personal viewpoints. Fitzgerald, 2008

6 Uses  Settings:  Classroom, Conferences, Distance learning, Addressing colleagues, Courtroom, Television  Most settings  Ways to adapt  Engaging combinations of lecture, group discussions, or virtual environment to appeal to the students desires for excitement, motivation and inspiration in learning. Jones, 2007

7 Pros & Cons  Pros  Highly structured  Efficient  Cost-Effective  Can be easily supplemented  Effective in lower-level cognitive domain  Allows a large amount of information to be relayed to a large amount of people at the same time  Cons  Ineffective in teaching affective and psychomotor behaviors  No stimulation of learners  Limited opportunity for learner involvement  Learners are passive  Not individualized Fitzgerald, 2006

8 Pros & Cons  Pros  Quantitatively efficient and flexible  Lecturer has control over content and delivery of material  Demonstrates patterns, main ideas, and present unique way of viewing information  Cons  Produces surface rather than deep learning  Learner boredom and inattention  Teacher is unable to compensate for learners individual preferred style of learning Fitzgerald, 2008 & Jones, 2007

9 Evaluation  Formative evaluation  Evaluation is ongoing throughout the education process.  Content evaluation  Determine if learners have acquired the knowledge or skills taught.  Takes place immediately after the learning experience.  Summative evaluation  Determine effects or outcomes of teaching efforts. Worral, 2006

10 Evaluation  Impact evaluation  Determine the relative effects of education on the institution or the community.  Program Evaluation  Determine the extent to which all activities for an entire department or program over a period of time to meet or exceed goals originally established.  Post-test, Self-evaluation, Observer  Likert Scale with written feedback  Discussion with learners Worral, 2006

11 Summary  Lecture is one of the oldest and most often used teaching methods.  Efficient and cost-effective method for relaying large amounts of information to large amounts of people at the same time.  Lecture includes an introduction, body, and conclusion.  Lecture can be used to provide background information, summarizing data, and presenting the latest research findings on a particular topic.  Can be used in a variety of settings.

12 Summary  Pros:  Highly structured, efficient, cost-effective, easily supplemented with audiovisual material, and flexible.  Cons:  Not individualized, learner boredom, ineffective for affective and psychomotor learners, and produces surface learning.  Evaluation methods include: formative, content, summative, impact, program, post-test, self- evaluation, discussion, Likert scale, and use of an observer.

13 References  Braungart, M.M., & Braungart, R.G. (2006). Applying learning theories to health care. In S.B. Bastable (Ed.), Essentials of patient education (pp ). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.  Fitzgerald, K. (2008). Instructional methods and settings. In S. B. Bastable (Ed.), Nurse as educator: Principles of teaching and learning for nursing practice (3rd ed., pp ). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.  Fitzgerald, K. (2006). Teaching methods and instructional settings. In S.B. Bastable (Ed.), Essentials of patient education (pp ). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

14 References  Jones, S., (2007). Reflections on the lecture: Outmoded medium or instrument of inspiration? Journal of Further and Higher Education, 31(4) doi: /  Worral, P.S. (2006). Evaluation in healthcare education. In S.B. Bastable (Ed.), Essentials of patient education (pp ). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.


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