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Vision in the making LesleyAnne Ezelle Region 10 Disability Integration Specialist.

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Presentation on theme: "Vision in the making LesleyAnne Ezelle Region 10 Disability Integration Specialist."— Presentation transcript:

1 Vision in the making LesleyAnne Ezelle Region 10 Disability Integration Specialist

2 Outline  Brief background on Region 10  Office of Disability Integration and Coordination and Regional Disability Integration Specialists  Definitions and percentages  My Background and Beliefs  Working towards Whole Community

3 FEMA Region 10

4 4 4 FEMA Mission “FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.”

5 5 FEMA Regional Boundaries

6  Service Area:  Alaska  Idaho  Oregon  Washington  Office Locations:  Bothell/Lynnwood / Woodinville  Alaska Area Office  Customers:  States  Local Governments  Tribal Nations (>300 entities)  Individuals FEMA Region 10

7 National Preparedness Division Patrick Massey Federal Preparedness Coordinator & NP Division Director Patrick Marcham Deputy Division Director National Preparedness Division Patrick Massey Federal Preparedness Coordinator & NP Division Director Patrick Marcham Deputy Division Director Mitigation Division Mark Carey Division Director Mark Eberlein Reg. Environmental Officer Mitigation Division Mark Carey Division Director Mark Eberlein Reg. Environmental Officer Recovery Division Charles Axton Division Director Jean Chaney Deputy Division Director Recovery Division Charles Axton Division Director Jean Chaney Deputy Division Director Mission Support Division Bryant Harrison Division Director Mission Support Division Bryant Harrison Division Director Response Division Lon Biasco Division Director John Sneed Deputy Division Director Response Division Lon Biasco Division Director John Sneed Deputy Division Director Regional Integration Branch Joseph Hesbrook Regional Integration Branch Joseph Hesbrook Planning & Assessments Branch Vince Cacanindin Planning & Assessments Branch Vince Cacanindin Hazard Mit Branch Chris Jonientz- Trisler Hazard Mit Branch Chris Jonientz- Trisler Floodplain Mgt & Insur Branch Mark Riebau Floodplain Mgt & Insur Branch Mark Riebau Risk Analysis Branch Ryan Ike Risk Analysis Branch Ryan Ike Operations Branch Jackie Gladish Operations Branch Jackie Gladish Logistics Branch Gretchen Martinsen Logistics Branch Gretchen Martinsen Public Assistance Branch Denise Yandle Public Assistance Branch Denise Yandle Individual Assistance Branch Christy Grant Individual Assistance Branch Christy Grant Admin Services Branch Kelli Accetturo Admin Services Branch Kelli Accetturo Information Tech Branch Thomas Hall Information Tech Branch Thomas Hall External Affairs PK White, Acting External Affairs PK White, Acting Regional Advisory Council (RAC) Defense Coordinating Element (DCE) Federal Coordinating Officers (FCOs) Planning Branch Vince Makovich Planning Branch Vince Makovich Tech Hazards Branch Bill Webb Tech Hazards Branch Bill Webb Grant Programs Division Richard Donovan Division Director Grant Programs Division Richard Donovan Division Director Alaska Area Office Emergency Comm Branch Terry Knight Emergency Comm Branch Terry Knight Office of the Regional Administrator Kenneth D. Murphy Regional Administrator Dennis A. Hunsinger Deputy Regional Administrator Office of the Regional Administrator Kenneth D. Murphy Regional Administrator Dennis A. Hunsinger Deputy Regional Administrator

8 8 ▪ The FEMA Administrator is appointed by the President, confirmed by Congress, reporting to DHS Secretary  4,250 authorized full-time permanent employees ▪ Approximately 12,000 on- call disaster assistance employees The FEMA Workforce

9 9 9 Emergency Management Philosophy Emergency Management Philosophy Define what Recovery means Determine Response by Outcomes The Public is a Resource (not a liability) Take Care of Survivors Everyone in FEMA is an Emergency Manager

10 Whole Community  “…experience has taught us that we must do a better job of providing services for the entire community, regardless of their background, demographics, or challenges. This means planning for the actual makeup of a community, making sure we meet the needs of every disaster survivor regardless of age, economics, or accessibility requirements.”

11 Whole community  “…Addressing these related concerns cannot be achieved by simply improving on what we have always done – we must fundamentally change how we go about disaster preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation, involving the communities we serve directly in these efforts. We must look beyond the traditional, “government-centric” approach to emergency management and embrace a philosophy and operational posture that leverages, and serves, the Whole Community.”

12 Whole Community  Expanding partnerships.  Partnership with community groups.  Looking beyond the traditional approach.  Integrating the needs of all people in the response, recovery, planning and mitigation.

13 Whole Community: Functional and Access needs  “ This means planning for the actual makeup of a community, making sure we meet the needs of every disaster survivor regardless of age, economics, or accessibility requirements.” Involves everyone in the process, not just some, but everyone…..

14 Regional Disability Integration Specialist  The role of the ODIC is to provide guidance, tools, methods, and strategies to integrate and coordinate emergency management efforts to meet the access and functional needs of all citizens, including children and adults with disabilities.  10 Specialists located within a Region  ODIC: Office of disability integration and coordination

15 National Response Framework  “…populations whose members may have additional needs before, during, and after an incident in functional areas, including but not limited to: maintaining independence, communication transportation, supervision, medical care. Individuals in need of additional response assistance may include; those who have disabilities; who live in institutionalized settings; who are elderly; who are children; who are from diverse cultures; who have limited English proficiency or are non-English speaking; or who are transportation disadvantaged.”

16 Functional and Access  Children and adults requiring FNSS may have:  Physical disabilities  Sensory disabilities  Mental health, cognitive and/or intellectual disabilities  Others who may benefit from FNSS include:  Women in late stages of pregnancy  Elders  People needing bariatric equipment, transportation or communications assistance.

17 Numbers  Approximately 20% of the population have a disability (sensory, physical, cognitive (mental health or intellectual) million  Add functional and access needs, the numbers increase significantly to 50% (Kailes, J. (2005). Disaster Services and “Special Needs:” Term of Art or Meaningless Term? Kailes-Publications)

18 The Road to Bothell  Two degrees in psychology  Group homes, treatment centers for recovering youth, individual support services  Research Fellow:  De-institutionalization  Community development  Organizational Development  Research

19 Road to Bothell  State Council on Developmental Disability  Forensic services  Developmental Center  Community based advocacy supports

20 Starting point:  Empowerment is about  “…having control over our own lives…that we are entitled to equal rights and opportunity, real choices that enable us to maintain control over our lives, power and authority over the supports and services designed to assist us, and full participation in our communities.” (disability empowerment center)  Self-advocacy  People First Language

21 Starting point:  Self-determination  the power or ability to make a decision for oneself without influence from outside

22 Starting point:  Importance of full and meaningful participation  Assessable materials and venue  Structure that enables meaningful contribution  Flexibility

23 Starting point:  Inclusion and integration  State of being included – being able to fully participate in the experience the same as anyone else.  Having the same opportunities as others

24 Starting point:  Community involvement and connection  Participation  Involvement  Reciprocity

25 ‘with’ not for ‘with’ not ‘for’

26 Focus – Whole Community  “We must look beyond the traditional, “government-centric” approach to emergency management and embrace a philosophy and operational posture that leverages, and serves, the Whole Community.”

27 Steps in the direction…  Meeting community partners.  Forging relationships with advocacy groups.  Bring expertise to the table as collaborators and partners.  Working internally as well as externally, in partnership, to meet the needs of the whole community.

28 Steps in the direction  Participating in meetings  Disseminating information  Creating a resource list  Providing supporting documentation 28

29 Contact Information   Telephone:

30 Whole Community  A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is reality. John Lennon John Lennon

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