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EddBE2011 Proceedings Morgan J. Bleek, BSc (Hons) MAIBS Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane.

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Presentation on theme: "EddBE2011 Proceedings Morgan J. Bleek, BSc (Hons) MAIBS Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane."— Presentation transcript:

1 eddBE2011 Proceedings Morgan J. Bleek, BSc (Hons) MAIBS Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane

2 INTRODUCTION Waste management cycle in the Built Environment context The ‘Regeneration’ presentation uses the SPEAR approach

3 SCOPE Four scenarios for material reuse in the built environment What is ‘ regeneration ’:- i.adaptive reuse ii.relocation iii.building component reuse following deconstruction

4 Built Environment professionals need to learn the rationale for sustainable development, to appreciate the key issues, how and when to apply the many environmental assessment tools now out in the market place A benefit of these learned practices is awareness of environment issues, standards and the assessment tools best practice and stimulate the market for sustainable construction and property’ the verification method and framework for professionals to use’ PRESENTATION

5 Current discrepancies in environmental assessment tools limit Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Framework environmental assessment tools in Australia and their inconsistencies to LCA can be seen in the chart below PRESENTATION

6 Specifically focused LCA tools in Australia 1.Building Products Innovation Council (BPIC), Building Products Life Cycle Inventory (BP LCI) 2.Cooperative Research Centre for Construction Innovation (CRCCI), LCAdesign 3.BRANZ, Appraisal Certificates 4.Australian Life Cycle Assessment Society (ALCAS), Australian Life Cycle Inventory Database Initiative (AusLCI) PRESENTATION

7 Existing buildings that are obsolete or rapidly approaching demise and potential demolition are a ‘mine’ of raw material for new projects Such a concept has been described as ‘urban ore’, and can be directly linked to the processes of ‘regeneration’ The process of ‘regeneration’ has recognisable environmental, social and economical benefits including:- lower greenhouse omissions reduced waste generation retaining of historical buildings or structures jobs creation due to labor intensive deconstruction increased proportional capital expenditure on refurbishment of existing property assets, apposed to new construction EVALUATION

8 Rather than retrofit or refurbishment; consider the process of ‘relocation’ in the context of ‘regeneration’ Where a building or structure is no longer ‘fit for purpose’, ‘adaptive reuse’ is a desirable outcome; Langston’s Adaptive Reuse Potential (ARP) model seeks to estimate a buildings finite life expectancy, supported by an assessment of its maintenance and restoration requirements, which linked to Atkinsons, ‘Urban ideals and the mechanism of renewal’ explores the concept of the ‘stacking’ From an environmental sustainability perspective, it is preferable to minimise new additions to the ‘stack’, but at the same time to remove those layers of poorer quality stock that absorbs excessive maintenance and operating resources. ANALYSIS

9 Langston’s Adaptive Reuse Potential (ARP) model seeks to estimate a buildings finite life expectancy

10 Increased resources should be allocated to maintenance and operating resources. Increased resources should be allocated to maintenance of those better quality layers of the ‘stack’ Atkinsons concept of ‘minimum decay’ that involves retarding; is the rate of obsolescence and replacement slowing down the sinking of the ‘stack’ by decreasing the consumption of new resources, and assigning increased resources to maintenance and refurbishment Where this can be linked to energy efficiency and comfort, the saving in embodied energy (energy already involved in manufacture and construction) is substantial This concept could be optimised through ‘regeneration’ by ‘a systematic evaluation of a building components suitability for reuse’, assessed using a rating framework developed with BP LCI data and similar to Langstons ‘index of reuse potential’ known as the ‘ARP score’ ANALYSIS

11 Further areas of research are required in the basis, methodologies and techniques, suitability for re-use index and delivery process framework towards; A systematic evaluation of building components suitable for reuse after deconstruction, include: In depth analysis of the BP LCI as a tool to develop an ARP assessment based framework in seeking a systematic evaluation of a building components suitability for reuse after deconstruction. Research the case study of the London Waste and Recycling Board funded facility in Croydon, London that sells building components suitable for reuse and incentives that it promotes to reduce landfill. RECOMMENDATION

12 Thank you


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