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Journalism 2001: Reporting and Writing I Week One January 28, 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "Journalism 2001: Reporting and Writing I Week One January 28, 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Journalism 2001: Reporting and Writing I Week One January 28, 2008

2 Words Matter!

3 Announcements Attendance! Attendance! Name cards Name cards Composition prerequisite Composition prerequisite –Comp 1120 If drop any classes, 100% tuition refund if dropped by January 29 If drop any classes, 100% tuition refund if dropped by January 29 –Drops to 75% Drops to 75%Drops to 75%

4 Introductions Instructor: Lucy Kragness Instructor: Lucy Kragness –University of Minnesota Duluth Experience  3/96 to present: Executive Assistant to the Chancellor  1/05 to present: Jour 2001 instructor  10/90 to 3/96: Alumni Director, University Relations  8/90 to 10/90: Acting Director, Alumni and Media Relations  11/84 to 10/90: Publications Director, Alumni and Media Relations  3/89 to 5/94: Taught Publications Editing, a three-credit spring quarter journalism course  6/85 to 6/90: Volunteer editorial adviser, Statesman student newspaper –Freelance Experience:  7/86 to present: Freelance writer, photographer for several regional and national publications

5 –Newspaper Experience:  9/83 to 9/84: One-person bureau in Sheridan, Wyo., for the Billings Gazette in Billings, Mont.  3/81 to 9/83: Assistant state editor at the Billings Gazette in Billings, Mont.  3/80 to 3/81: Managing editor of the Williston Daily Herald, Plains Reporter (weekly) and the Williston Basin Reporter (bi- weekly), all in Williston, N.D.  11/79 to 3/80: Assistant managing editor/Sunday editor at the Williston Daily Herald  6/79 to 11/79: Reporter, business editor at the Williston Daily Herald  11/78 to 6/79: Assistant editor at the Northeaster newspaper in Minneapolis. –Education:  Master of Education in Educational Computing and Technology, University of Minnesota Duluth,  Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Minnesota Minneapolis, –Personal:  Married, two grown stepchildren, grandma!

6 Remember this photo….

7 Let’s look at syllabus

8 Office Hours: 502 Darland Mondays between 3:30-4:30 p.m. Mondays between 3:30-4:30 p.m. Before/after class Before/after class By appointment By appointment

9 Texts News Writing and Reporting for Today’s Media, Itule & Anderson (7 th Edition) News Writing and Reporting for Today’s Media, Itule & Anderson (7 th Edition) Associated Press Stylebook Associated Press Stylebook

10 Course description First course for journalism minor First course for journalism minor Basic news reporting/writing Basic news reporting/writing

11 Student Responsibilities Mandatory attendance Mandatory attendance –Please arrive on time –Turn off cell phones –Avoid surfing the Internet! –Respect classmates/instructor Weekly writing/editing assignments Weekly writing/editing assignments In-class assignments In-class assignments Class participation Class participation Snowy? Call UMD snow hotline: 726-SNOW Snowy? Call UMD snow hotline: 726-SNOW Current event quizzes Current event quizzes Bring fully charged laptop to class each week Bring fully charged laptop to class each week

12 Daily reading of the Duluth News-Tribune Daily reading of the Duluth News-TribuneDuluth News-TribuneDuluth News-Tribune  Front page, opinion, local news, sports  Subscription specials for students living off campus Weekly reading of the Statesman Weekly reading of the StatesmanStatesman Daily viewing of a local news program Daily viewing of a local news program –WDIO-TV: Channel 10 (Charter Channel 13) WDIO-TV  ABC affiliate –KDLH-TV : Channel 3 (Charter Channel 4) KDLH-TV  CBS Affiliate –KBJR-TV: Channel 6 (Charter Channel 5) KBJR-TV  NBC Affiliate –KQDS Channel 21 What’s the connection between KDLH/KBJR? What’s the connection between KQDS 21 and the Duluth News-Tribune?

13 Final Project: Due May 12 Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. Store academic information on your Electronic Portfolio. Each student has 100 mb of storage. –Access Electronic Portfolio at: https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.jsp https://portfolio.umn.edu/portfolio/index.jsp

14 Grading Major writing assignments: 28% Major writing assignments: 28% In-class assignments: 26% In-class assignments: 26% –Lowest assignment dropped Weekly assignments: 24% Weekly assignments: 24% –Lowest assignment dropped Class participation: 14% Class participation: 14% Final project: 3% Final project: 3% Story pitches: 5% Story pitches: 5% Egradebook: Egradebook: –http://www.d.umn.edu/egradebook

15 Extra Credit Article published: 10 points Article published: 10 points –Need prior approval Letter to the Editor published: 10 points Letter to the Editor published: 10 points –Duluth News-Tribune –Minneapolis Star-Tribune –St. Paul Pioneer Press Media tours: 10 points Media tours: 10 points Other: Arranged Other: Arranged

16 Late assignments Journalism definition: Journalism definition: –The collection and editing of news for presentation through the media Old news = no news: Old news = no news: –No late assignments!

17 Cina 104 Available to all journalism students Available to all journalism students

18 Internships Internships key to journalism positions Internships key to journalism positions Marty Sozansky, Department of Composition, coordinates internships Marty Sozansky, Department of Composition, coordinates internships

19 Student Academic Integrity Policy UMD is committed to providing students every possible opportunity to grow in mind and spirit. This pledge can only be redeemed in an environment of trust, honesty and fairness. As a result, academic dishonesty is regarded as a serious offense by all members of the academic community. UMD is committed to providing students every possible opportunity to grow in mind and spirit. This pledge can only be redeemed in an environment of trust, honesty and fairness. As a result, academic dishonesty is regarded as a serious offense by all members of the academic community.

20 Student Conduct Code Students are expected to follow the University’s Student Conduct Code Students are expected to follow the University’s Student Conduct Code Student Conduct Code Student Conduct Code Disruptive classroom behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor’s ability to teach, or student learning, is prohibited. Disruptive classroom behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor’s ability to teach, or student learning, is prohibited. Disruptive behavior includes ringing cell phones, text-messaging, watching videos, playing computer games, surfing the Internet, doing . Disruptive behavior includes ringing cell phones, text-messaging, watching videos, playing computer games, surfing the Internet, doing .

21 Students with Disabilities Individuals who have any disability, either permanent or temporary, that might affect their ability to perform in this class are encouraged to inform the instructor at the start of the semester. Adaptation of methods, materials, or testing may be made as required to provide for equitable participation. Individuals who have any disability, either permanent or temporary, that might affect their ability to perform in this class are encouraged to inform the instructor at the start of the semester. Adaptation of methods, materials, or testing may be made as required to provide for equitable participation.

22 How will the class work? Weekly reading assignments Weekly reading assignments In-class assignments In-class assignments Weekly out-of-class assignments Weekly out-of-class assignments Major reporting assignments Major reporting assignments Current event quizzes Current event quizzes –A journalist must follow the news! All assignments need to be completed in Microsoft Word and sent as an attachment to:

23 Let’s look at List of Assignments

24 Questions about syllabus? Syllabus, assignments, lectures at:

25 Let’s practice Connect to UMD Wireless Access Connect to UMD Wireless Access –http://www.d.umn.edu/itss/computing/wireless/ Microsoft Word available almost free to all students: Microsoft Word available almost free to all students: –http://www.d.umn.edu/itss/software/ Open Microsoft Word Open Microsoft Word  Open blank file  Type: testing  Save file to desktop as: Class test Open Mail Program Open Mail Program  New message  Send to this address:  Copy yourself: Add cc:  Attach file  Send!

26 Words matter!

27 We’ll focus on local issues

28 Who is the current mayor of Duluth? 1. Don Ness 2. Herb Bergson 3. Gary Doty

29 When was Don Ness elected mayor? 1. Three years ago 2. Two years ago 3. Last November

30 Is Mayor Ness a graduate of UMD? 1. Yes 2. No

31 As a student at UMD, Don Ness was ___________. 1. Captain of the UMD basketball team 2. Editor of the Statesman 3. Student Association President

32 What was a big issue in the mayoral election? 1. Duluth Public Schools 2. Paying for retiree health care 3. Closing of U.S. Steel

33 The Duluth Public Schools system is beginning a reorganization process. What is it called? 1. Time for change 2. The Red Plan 3. Zenith City Plan

34 Duluth voters approved the Red Plan for reorganization of the Duluth Public Schools. 1. Yes 2. No

35

36 Chapter 1: Today’s Media Remembering 9/11 Remembering 9/11 –Moment of silence Where were you on 9/11? Where were you on 9/11? How did you hear the news? How did you hear the news? News events help define generations News events help define generations

37 Focus on print journalism Text focuses on print reporters: Text focuses on print reporters: –Jim Heffernan, former opinion editor, Duluth News-Tribune –Tim Franklin, publisher of the Hinckley News, Pine County Courier (former Statesman editor, editor/reporter in Cloquet, Grand Marais, Duluth) –Tom Wilkowske, former Wave editor, Duluth News-Tribune

38 Journalism skills helped these UMD grads: Journalism skills helped these UMD grads: –TV news reporters  Dennis Anderson, anchor for WDIO-TV  Amy Rutledge, former anchor for KDLH-TV; Westmoreland Flint representative; new anchor for KQDS Channel 21  Kyle Underwood, WDIO-TV Kyle Underwood, WDIO-TV Kyle Underwood, WDIO-TV –Public relations  Susan Latto, UMD Public Relations Director –Sports Information  Bob Nygaard, UMD Sports Information Director –Grant writers/non-profit organizations  Cindy Finch, Woodland Hills –Publication editors  Cheryl Reitan, UMD Publications Director –Advertising  John Hyduke, Westmoreland Flint –Government relations  Julene Boe, City of Duluth  Jess Myers, Minnesota Senate Office/former Hockey News

39 Newspaper industry shrinking 1,745 U.S. daily newspapers in ,745 U.S. daily newspapers in ,457 U.S. daily newspapers in ,457 U.S. daily newspapers in 2002 In 1970: 78 percent of adults read a newspaper daily In 1970: 78 percent of adults read a newspaper daily In 2002: 58 percent of men and 53 percent of women read a daily newspaper In 2002: 58 percent of men and 53 percent of women read a daily newspaper –Biggest drop in readers 34 and younger

40 Newspaper industry not dead One of the most profitable U.S. industries One of the most profitable U.S. industries –Captures huge share of U.S. advertising dollar*  Direct Mail: 19.4 percent  Daily Newspapers: 18.6 percent  Broadcast television: 17.8 percent  Radio: 8 percent  Cable television: 6.9 percent  All other 29.3 percent –All media face challenges * Source: McCann-Erickson Inc., Newspaper Association of America (News Reporting and Writing, The Missouri Group)

41 Multimedia Organizations Time Warner Time Warner –Began with Time magazine

42 Walt Disney Company Walt Disney Company –Walt Disney Studios –Walt Disney amusement parks –ABC television network –Several local radio and television stations –ESPN and its magazine –The Disney Store –The Disney Channel Microsoft Network Microsoft Network –Recruited from newspapers, broadcast stations

43 “The New Old Journalism” Article by Adam L. Pennenberg Article by Adam L. Pennenberg –Journalism professor at New York University

44 General assignment reporters General assignment reporters  Spot news  Night reporter Beat reporters Beat reporters  Education  Crime/courts  Government: city, county, regional, state, national Specialty reporters Specialty reporters  Multicultural  Family  Taste  Business How reporters cover the news

45 Newspaper Editorial Organization Managing Editor Sports Editor Lifestyle Editor City EditorNews Editor State Editor Sports Reporters Lifestyle Reporters Copy editors Chief photographer Photographer Reporters

46 Other Newspaper Departments Advertising Advertising –Local display –Classified –National –Advertising art –Ad promotion –Public relations –Community relations Circulation Circulation –Mail room –Delivery Business Business –Accounting –Billing –Credit –Payroll –Credit union –Labor Relations Production Production –Composing –Platemaking –Camera –Data processing –Press

47 What goes in the newspaper Daily editorial meeting Daily editorial meeting –Editors make story pitches –Editor/managing editor makes final decision –Photography or graphic assignments finalized Deadlines for multiple editions Deadlines for multiple editions

48 Journalism Case Studies Throughout semester we’ll look at ethical dilemmas journalists face on the job Throughout semester we’ll look at ethical dilemmas journalists face on the job –Compiled by University of Indiana School of Journalism Today: When Journalists Play God Today: When Journalists Play God Go to:

49 “It's impossible to teach anyone to be a journalist because most of the skills necessary to be a good journalist — an insatiable curiosity, a tenacity for the truth and a love of words — must be developed within. Those of us who have chosen to teach journalism don't really teach, we merely light the way.” — Prof. Malcolm Gibson, College Program Guide, published by The New York Times Co. — Prof. Malcolm Gibson, College Program Guide, published by The New York Times Co.

50 Words matter!

51 Chapter 2: Ingredients of News What is news? What is news? –Folklore definition:  North  East  West  South Let’s hear your definitions…

52 Dictionary definition of news Merriam Webster Online Definition: 1 a : a report of recent events b : previously unknown information 2 a : material reported in a newspaper or news periodical or on a newscast b : matter that is newsworthy

53 What is hard news? 1. Timely events reported almost automatically by the media. 2. Events not usually considered immediately important or timely to a wide audience.

54 Are these hard news or soft news? Car wash by fourth graders to raise money for a classmate with cancer Car wash by fourth graders to raise money for a classmate with cancer Murder in Lakeside Murder in Lakeside High wind creating surf conditions for wind surfers High wind creating surf conditions for wind surfers City council meeting City council meeting Strike by AFSCME Strike by AFSCME

55 Hard News Murders Murders City Council meetings City Council meetings Government meetings Government meetings Not always bad news: major announcements Not always bad news: major announcements Soft News Retirements Retirements School programs School programs Human interest Human interest

56 Convergence Collaboration between newspapers, TV and Internet Collaboration between newspapers, TV and Internet –KDLH/Duluth News Tribune –Newspaper reporter/radio reporter Community Connectedness: Community Connectedness: –Sue Clark-Johnson, Arizona Republic

57 What does it mean for a journalist to be objective? Let’s hear your definitions Let’s hear your definitions

58 A subjective/objective business Journalist’s feelings, thoughts, experiences influence a story Journalist’s feelings, thoughts, experiences influence a story Objectivity key to respect of media Objectivity key to respect of media What’s a gatekeeper? What’s a gatekeeper? –Editors, reporters, sources –Big responsibility: Deciding what’s news Evolving process Evolving process –Editor/reporter tap dance

59 What makes news? Timeliness Timeliness –Train derailment Proximity/Relevance Proximity/Relevance Conflict Conflict Prominence Prominence Consequence/impact Consequence/impact Human interest/novelty Human interest/novelty

60 Factors affecting news Instincts of reporters Instincts of reporters Audience: local vs. regional Audience: local vs. regional News holes News holes –Space left after ads placed –Dummy pages Availability of news Availability of news –Saturday a slow news day –Wire services: AP, Gannett, LA Times, NY Times

61 Philosophy of the medium Philosophy of the medium –Wall Street Journal, Duluth News-Tribune, Proctor Journal –KBJR vs. NBC Nightly News Pressure from the publisher Pressure from the publisher Influence from advertisers Influence from advertisers The news mix The news mix Competition among media Competition among media Changing demographics Changing demographics

62 Pitching a news story What’s the angle? What’s the angle? Succinctness/enthusiasm Succinctness/enthusiasm –If you’re bored by the story, why bother? –Less is usually more! Monitoring other media Monitoring other media

63 Let’s look at Duluth News-Tribune

64 Assignment for 2/4: Using the Tuesday (January 29, 2008) Duluth News- Tribune, list the stories on the front page, local section and the sports section. Determine if the stories where selected on the traditional news elements of: Using the Tuesday (January 29, 2008) Duluth News- Tribune, list the stories on the front page, local section and the sports section. Determine if the stories where selected on the traditional news elements of: –Timeliness –Proximity/relevance –Conflict –Prominence –Consequence & impact –Human Interest Keep evaluations brief: no more than three sentences each. Microsoft Word attachment to:

65 Reading Assignment Read Chapters 3, 4, 5 Read Chapters 3, 4, 5 Read the Duluth News-Tribune! Read the Duluth News-Tribune!

66 Words still matter!

67 How to use AP Stylebook Stylebook Key Stylebook Key –Addresses:  Is this correct? 25 East Silver St. –Spellings:  Adviser/advisor; Legislative titles Sports Guidelines and Style Sports Guidelines and Style Business Guidelines and Style Business Guidelines and Style A Guide to Punctuation A Guide to Punctuation Editing Marks Editing Marks

68 Don’t memorize, familiarize!

69 Today’s assignment AP Stylebook editing practice AP Stylebook editing practice Prepare a Microsoft word file with the following information and send it as an attachment to: Prepare a Microsoft word file with the following information and send it as an attachment to: –Your name, hometown –Your year at UMD –Your major/minor –Your career goals –Journalism experience (OK if none!) –What you hope to get out of this class –Anything else you’d like me to know –Best day for media tour from 4-6 p.m.


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