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Early On® Michigan Child Outcomes 1 Measuring Child Outcomes: Am I following the correct recipe?

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Presentation on theme: "Early On® Michigan Child Outcomes 1 Measuring Child Outcomes: Am I following the correct recipe?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Early On® Michigan Child Outcomes 1 Measuring Child Outcomes: Am I following the correct recipe?

2 What is an Outcome? 2 An “outcome” is defined as a benefit experienced as a result of services received. Thus an outcome is neither the receipt of services nor satisfaction with services, but rather something that happens because services are provided. Source: ECO Center

3 Why Do We Need To Measure And Report Early Childhood Outcomes? 3 Federal attention to accountability 2003Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) 2003Early Childhood Outcomes Center (ECO Center) 2004IDEIA reauthorization – SPP/APR

4 Early On Child Outcomes: SPP Indicator 3 4 The overarching goal for all children is to be active and successful participants now and in the future, in a variety of settings: 1. Children have positive social relationships. 2. Children acquire and use knowledge and skills. 3. Children take appropriate action to meet their needs.

5 Functional Outcomes: 5 “ The three childhood outcomes are functional in that they reflect a child’s ability to take meaningful action in the context of everyday living.” “The outcome areas cross developmental domains, emphasizing the integration of skills and behaviors across domains for meaningful action.” Source: ECO Center

6 A Puzzle 6 8, 5, 4, 1, 7, 6, 3, 2 Where does 9 go? Where does 0 go?

7 How Will The Early Childhood Outcomes Be Measured? 7 Data Sources Data from one or more assessment tools Observation Family Input Frequency of Measurement ENTRY data within 90 days of enrollment date EXIT data within 90 days of exit date (if enrolled for at least 6 continuous months)

8 8 Determine Rating Domain/Skill-based information Comprehensive Developmental Assessment Other Assessment information (if available) Functioning across settings and situations Observation Parent Input Rating for Functional Outcome 1 For Each Child Enrolled In Early On (referred before 2.5 years old) Rating for Functional Outcome 2 Rating for Functional Outcome 3

9 How Will The Early Childhood Outcomes Be Measured? 9 Rating Scale Not YetEmergingSomewhatCompletely

10 How Will the Early Childhood Outcomes Be Measured? 10 1Not YetChild does not yet show functioning expected of a child his or her age in any situation. Child’s skills and behaviors also do not yet include any immediate foundational skills upon which to build age appropriate functioning. Child’s functioning might be described as that of a much younger child. 2Between Not Yet & Emerging Some of the foundational skills are there, though not all the immediate foundational skills. 3EmergingChild does not yet show functioning expected of a child of his or her age in any situation. Child’s behavior and skills include immediate foundational skills upon which to build age appropriate functioning. Functioning might be described as like that of a younger child. 4Between Emerging & Somewhat Immediate foundational skills are in place, and child has demonstrated age appropriate skills once or twice, perhaps not deliberately. 5SomewhatChild shows functioning expected for his or her age some of the time and/or in some situations. Child’s functioning is a mix of age appropriate and not appropriate functioning. Functioning might be described as like that of a slightly younger child. 6Between Somewhat & Completely Child’s functioning generally is considered appropriate for his or her age but there are some concerns about the child’s functioning in this outcome area. 7CompletelyThe child shows functioning expected for his or her age in all or almost all everyday situations that are part of the child’s life. Functioning is considered appropriate for his or her age. No one has any concerns about the child’s functioning in this outcome area.

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13 Children have positive social relationships 13 Involves: Relating with adults Relating with other children For older children, following rules related to groups or interacting with others Includes areas like: Attachment/separation/autonomy Expressing emotions and feelings Learning rules and expectations Social interactions and play

14 Children acquire and use knowledge and skills 14 Involves Thinking Reasoning Remembering Problem solving Using symbols and language Understanding physical and social worlds Includes: Early concepts—symbols, pictures, numbers Imitation Object permanence Expressive language and communication Early literacy

15 Children take appropriate action to meet their needs 15 Involves: Taking care of basic needs (e.g., hunger, warmth, security) Getting from place to place Using tools (e.g., fork, toothbrush, crayon) In older children, contributing to their own health and safety Includes: Integrating motor skills to complete tasks Self-help skills (e.g., dressing, feeding, grooming, toileting, household responsibility) Acting on the world to get what one wants

16 Including Families in the Discussion Early Childhood Outcomes Center 16 Family input is critical: Yes - That they will be able to provide rich information about their child’s functioning across settings and situation Maybe but not necessarily – That they will know whether their child is showing age appropriate behavior

17 Involving Families in a Conversation about Their Child Early Childhood Outcomes Center 17 Avoid jargon Avoid questions that can be answered with a yes or no  “Does Anthony finger feed himself?” Ask questions that allow parents to tell you what they have seen  “Tell me about how Anthony eats”

18 18 Open Movie

19 Quality Review of COSF Team Discussion Early Childhood Outcomes Center 19 Does the team describe the child’s functioning, rather than just test scores? Does the discussion include the child’s full range of functioning, including skills and behaviors that are age appropriate, immediate foundational, and leading to immediate foundational?

20 What do we need to show? When the data is aggregated, we hope to show that:  as a State………  for each Local Service Area…….. ……..Early On supports children to make developmental progress (measured in comparison to same-aged peers). 20

21 Hypothetical Language Acquisition Rates for Three Groups of Children: Change in Developmental Trajectory (Progress toward Closing the Gap) 21

22 Questions? Early Childhood Outcomes Center 22 ?


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