Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

COACH TRACKING STUDY John McIlroy, Information Manager John Driscoll, Executive Director.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "COACH TRACKING STUDY John McIlroy, Information Manager John Driscoll, Executive Director."— Presentation transcript:

1 COACH TRACKING STUDY John McIlroy, Information Manager John Driscoll, Executive Director

2 The background and context Lead agency for coaching in the UK Established in 1983 as “coaching arm” of the Sports Council Majority of funding from Sport England and UK Sport Coaching Matters established need for research into coaching demands and requirements The UK Vision for Coaching and Coaching Task Force reinforced need for research into coaching

3 One of the largest studies undertaken into coaching These coaches are the backbone of the system and their opinions are important

4 Who is being coached? Three quarters of full- time coaches work with younger children Over one-third of volunteers are active in clubs Adults participants are more likely to come into contact with volunteers

5 Starting to coach Motivation to continue Support received Developing as a coach Stopping coaching The Coaching Journey Similarities, differences and issues

6 Why do people decide to become a coach? Full-time coach 1. Start a career in coaching (66%) 2. Give something back (50%) 3. Stay involved in sport (31%) Volunteer coach 1.Give something back (60%) 2. Lack of coaches (53%) 3. Start a career in coaching (34%) Differences FT more influenced by careers Vol more influenced by lack of coaches, helping their children and helping their old club

7 Why do people continue to coach? Nine out of ten coaches agree I like the interaction with participants I like seeing participants develop their skills and improve I like the buzz when participants do well, knowing that I had something to do with that Differences FT more likely to be influenced by careers and salaries PLUS personal development, competition and maintaining involvement Vol more likely to be influenced by helping their children and helping their old club

8 Do coaches feel supported? Full-time coaches are much more likely to feel supported by their governing body (86% 59%)

9 Support volunteer coaches want Better communication Funding More mentoring and individual support A support network That the XXXX actually starts to listen to coaches and appreciates that the majority of coaches are volunteers. Provide better support for community coaches. A possible network system for coaches - maybe a forum?

10 How do coaches develop? Volunteers and full-time coaches agree on the most important sources of learning Coaching practice Working with participants Reading books, magazines etc Reflection Differences FT coaches place more importance on Training Needs Analysis, qualifications and conferences Vol coaches place more importance on work experience, working with other coaches and their experiences as a player

11 Why do coaches stop? Full-time Volunteers

12 Less opportunity of finding work in this area. Less opportunities and had less time. Would have liked to have continued, but there just wasn't enough money in the sector to continue. Lack of support at my club. not enough time with work life balance. Frustration. Because of bad management of the football team and because of the club as a whole, being too concerned about money, more than about teaching the kids about football. System related comments

13 Conclusion Starting to coach Volunteers more focussed on the community and helping others Motivation to continue Primary reasons are personal and results are consistent across ALL coaches Secondary reasons show volunteers are more focussed on community concerns Support received The most striking difference is how volunteers are less likely to feel supported by their Governing Body Developing as a coach ALL coaches have similar development preferences Volunteers are more likely to place importance on informal learning Stopping coaching Not surprisingly volunteers are more likely to stop coaching for system related reasons

14 Coaching in their own words


Download ppt "COACH TRACKING STUDY John McIlroy, Information Manager John Driscoll, Executive Director."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google