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PERFORMANCE ACCOUNTABILITY: WIA YOUTH PERFORMANCE MEASURES John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

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Presentation on theme: "PERFORMANCE ACCOUNTABILITY: WIA YOUTH PERFORMANCE MEASURES John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey."— Presentation transcript:

1 PERFORMANCE ACCOUNTABILITY: WIA YOUTH PERFORMANCE MEASURES John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey Sar Levitan Center for Public Policy Study Johns Hopkins University National Youth Employment Coalition May 2000

2 2 Required Youth Council Role Required Youth Council Role Planning youth workforce activities Establish linkages with other organizations serving youth Consider full range of issues that can have an impact on the success of youth in the labor market Assist Workforce Investment Board in: - Selecting eligible providers - Negotiating local performance goals

3 3 WIA Youth Programs WIA Youth Programs A Comprehensive, Long-Term Approach Preparing youth to succeed in the labor market Improving educational achievement levels Providing a sustained support system Providing leadership and citizenship development

4 4 Youth Performance Measures Promote and Encourage: Youth development approaches Long-term attachment Collaboration Further education and training, both before and during employment A continuum of services that lead to skill attainment, educational advancement, credentials and job placement

5 5 Youth Performance Measures A New Approach Different measures for different age groups – Older Youth = 19 to 21 at entry –Younger Youth = 14 to 18 at entry Different points in time –While receiving services –After services were received (with UI: not always immediately after) –6 months after services New data source -- UI wage records

6 Youth Performance Measures Older Youth -- Youth at entry Entered Employment Rate Employment Retention Rate Earnings Change Credential Rate

7 Youth Performance Measures Younger Youth -- Youth at entry Skill Attainment Rate Diploma or Equivalent Attainment Rate Retention Rate

8 Youth Performance Measures Customer Satisfaction Both older and younger youth and employers working with youth programs are included in the two customer satisfaction measures.

9 9 Older Youth Entered Employment Rate Measures the number of youth who didn’t have a job before services and got a job after services Measures what happens right after services Recognizes enrollment in education: Youth who exit but are in post-secondary education or advanced training are not included in the measure.

10 10 Older Youth Employment Retention Rate Measures the number of youth who had a job after leaving services and still had a job 6 months later Longer-term measure (6 months after services) Recognizes enrollment in education: Youth who are in post-secondary education or advanced training 6 months after exit are not included in the measure.

11 11 Older Youth Earnings Change Compares earnings youth had 6 months before services to 6 months after services Longer-term measure (6 months after services) Recognizes enrollment in education: Youth who exit but are in post-secondary education or advanced training 6 months after exit are not included in the measure.

12 12 Older Youth Credential Rate Measures the number of youth in employment, post-secondary education or training who acquire a recognized credential during services or within 6 months after services Longer-term measure (6 months after services) Recognizes and rewards attainment of credentials “Recognized credentials” defined locally by state

13 13 Younger Youth Skill Attainment Rate Measures the attainment of basic, work readiness or occupational skills while receiving services “Real time” -- measures what’s happening while youth are receiving services Rewards flexible intermediate goals Compares achievement to planned achievement

14 14 Younger Youth Diploma or Equivalent Attainment Rate Of those who enter without a diploma or equivalent, measures the number of youth who receive one by the time they leave services or right after leaving services. In-school youth who leave services and are still in school are excluded from this measure. Recognizes importance of high school diploma/equivalent

15 15 Younger Youth Retention Rate Measures the proportion of youth who are in the following activities 6 months after they leave services: 3Post-secondary education 3Qualified apprenticeships 3Employment 3Advanced training 3Military service Longer-term measure (6 months after services) Recognizes variety of positive outcomes for youth

16 16 Performance Goals Goals should reflect the vision and priorities of the Youth Council and local Workforce Investment Board Goals should be realistic and attainable Goals will be negotiated between the State and each local Workforce Investment Board

17 17 Performance Goals (cont’d) For incentives, states must achieve at least 100% score for each program area, with no measures below 80% of goal -- states may hold workforce investment areas to the same requirements Incentives and sanctions linked to attainment of goals States may be sanctioned if performance below 80% on any measure

18 18 Year 1 of WIA Performance MeasuresAvg. Perf. Level Older Youth Entered Employment Rate63% Employment Retention Rate77% Earnings Change in Six Months $3,150 Credential Rate50% Younger Youth Skill Attainment Rate72% Diploma or Equivalent Attainment Rate55% Retention Rate54%

19 19 How Measures Promote Long-Term Attachment and Collaboration Youth need not exit from WIA based on program or funding source. They may continue in adult WIA or partner services. Exit-based measures apply to all programs only after final exit -- allowing a full range of services. Once a youth registers for WIA youth services, the program can get credit for partner outcomes (as long as a Memorandum of Understanding is in place). The more partners you have, the greater the chance for success!

20 20 On a scale of 1 to 10, how much consideration do you believe should be given to WIA youth performance measures when Councils design their youth delivery systems? Little or no importanceGreat importance What do you think?

21 21 Implications for Program Design Flexibility for Youth Council in designing programs that meet community’s needs Emphasis on longer-term programs, with consistent case management, support and follow-up Collaborate with partners and formalize with Memoranda of Understanding Focus on skill attainment, educational advancement, credentials and job placement

22 22 Effect on Program Management Information system needed for day-to-day management and to project performance on longer-term measures Case management system needed to constantly track/follow participants Benchmarks/goals for vendors need to be clearly defined Strong network of vendors and partners needed

23 23 Performance Measures Help to define desired outcomes Can be negotiated based on economic conditions, characteristics of participants, or program design Should reflect program design -- not drive it


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