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Intercultural Sensitivity (Part I) Honors Pro-seminar (HSS 198) (Monday, November 13, 2006; 6:30-8:00) Facilitator: Penelope Pynes (Director, Study Abroad.

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Presentation on theme: "Intercultural Sensitivity (Part I) Honors Pro-seminar (HSS 198) (Monday, November 13, 2006; 6:30-8:00) Facilitator: Penelope Pynes (Director, Study Abroad."— Presentation transcript:

1 Intercultural Sensitivity (Part I) Honors Pro-seminar (HSS 198) (Monday, November 13, 2006; 6:30-8:00) Facilitator: Penelope Pynes (Director, Study Abroad & Exchanges at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Image from:

2 Agenda I.Scope and purpose of session II.Taste of Home III. Toe to Toe IV. What is culture? V. Diversity Iceberg VI. Identity molecule VII. Bennett’s Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) VIII. DMIS & study abroad IX. Question & Answer X. Summary, Wrap-Up, and Feedback

3 What is culture? You may remember previously working with a partner to jot down your definition of culture You may remember previously working with a partner to jot down your definition of culture

4 The learned and shared patterns of beliefs, behaviors, and values of groups of interacting people Subjective Culture Source: Bennett 1998: 3.

5 Diversity Iceberg

6 Identity Molecule

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8 Ethnocentric Stages Ethno-relative Stages DenialDefenseMinimizationAcceptanceAdaptationIntegration Experience of Difference Milton Bennett’s Model: Development of Intercultural Sensitivity Source: Bennett & Bennett in Landis et al. 2004: 153.

9 Stages of Intercultural Sensitivity Denial: Does not recognize cultural differences Defense: Recognizes some differences, but sees them as negative Minimization: Unaware of projection of own cultural values; sees own values as superior Acceptance: Shifts perspectives to understand that the same ordinary behavior can have different meanings in different cultures Adaptation: Can evaluate others’ behavior from their frame of reference and can adapt behavior to fit the norms of a different culture Integration: Can shift frame of reference and also deal with resulting identity issues Source: Source:

10 Activity Place each of the 18 statements into one of the six stages of the DMIS Place each of the 18 statements into one of the six stages of the DMIS

11 Culture/DMIS & Study Abroad How can understanding culture help you in your everyday life? How can understanding culture help you in your everyday life? How can using the DMIS help in preparation for study abroad? How can using the DMIS help in preparation for study abroad?

12 Developmental task Denial: Recognize cultural differences that are escaping your notice Defense: Become more tolerant of differences and recognize the basic commonalities among people of different cultures Minimization: Learn more about your own culture and projecting that culture onto other people’s experience Acceptance: Link your knowledge about your own and other cultures to the skill of shifting perspective Adaptation-Cognitive frame-shifting: Link your cognitive ability to other aspects of your behavior, with the goal of generating natural behavior in more than one cultural context Adaptation-Behavioral frame-shifting: Deal with identity issues associated with the chameleon effect that may accompany your cultural flexibility EM: See yourself less as a victim of cultural confusion and more as a conscious constructor of multiple cultural experiences

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14 Intercultural Sensitivity (Part II) Honors Pro-seminar (HSS 198) (Monday, November 27, 2006; 6:30-8:00) Facilitator: Penelope Pynes (Director, Study Abroad & Exchanges at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Image from:

15 Agenda I.Scope and purpose of session II. Stereotypes vs. Generalizations III. American Proverbs and heroes IV. What others say about Americans V. Nonverbal communication across Cultures VI. Stumbling blocks to intercultural communication VII. Intercultural competence in everyday life VIII. Question & Answer

16 Differentiating Stereotypes and Generalizations This exercise gives you some practice in differentiating between stereotypes and generalizations. Read each statement below and decide whether you think it is a stereotype or generalization. S = Stereotype G = Generalization 1. Many Latinos cherish their family life, so it’s not surprising that Rosa still lives at home. 2. The Japanese are xenophobic, which is understandable because they live on an island country; separate from other countries. 3. It figures that Boris likes to go out drinking, since alcoholism is widespread in Russia. 4. I don’t understand how Huang could do so poorly on the tests. Asians are supposed to be good at math. 5. The French have a deep respect for their language and culture, and they usually prefer that foreigners speak in French when they visit.

17 Differentiating Stereotypes and Generalizations 6. In Italy when a man approaches a woman he’s only interested in one thing. 7. In Japan the man typically is the breadwinner of the family, and he will often value the company he works for more than his family life. 8. America is a violent country. Every one carries a gun. 9. I can’t imagine that Jenny comes from Sweden since she doesn’t have light-colored hair and blue eyes. 10. Germans tend to be very concerned about environmental issues and recycling.

18 Popular Saying or Expression What might these sayings suggest about U.S. values and beliefs? 1. “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” 2. “Make lemons into lemonade” 3. “Make yourself at home” 4. “Don’t blame me!” 5. “The squeaky wheel gets the grease” 6. “Where there’s a will, there’s a way” 7. “Talk is cheap” 8. “It’s no big deal” 9. “What’s the bottom line?” 10. “What’s up?”

19 Heroes/Heroines Divide into groups of four or five. Divide into groups of four or five. In your small group compile a list of your favorite heroes or heroines. In your small group compile a list of your favorite heroes or heroines. Ascertain their most prominent characteristics and the values they imply. Ascertain their most prominent characteristics and the values they imply. Share with the whole class. Share with the whole class.

20 International Perspectives on U.S. Americans We asked some international students to comment on their first impressions of life in the U.S. This will give you a sense of what “outsiders” notice about life in the U.S. and how they may view you, knowing you are a U.S. American. We asked some international students to comment on their first impressions of life in the U.S. This will give you a sense of what “outsiders” notice about life in the U.S. and how they may view you, knowing you are a U.S. American.

21 International Perspectives on U.S. Americans Uzbekistan My fellow, Uzbek friends say that Americans are freedom-lovers,’ free to express themselves,’ and ‘open-minded.’ To that I can add that Americans adore their country and are real patriots of their native land. They do not know limits. For example, a 46-year-old can decide to go to college to get a bachelor’s degree. They also love money and spend most of their time earning and saving. At the same time, they like recreational activities a lot, such as sports, travel, etc. Also, they are into the ‘political correctness’ thing a lot. Americans are very ‘environmentally conscious,’ meaning they care about the environment and ecology a lot and enforce environmentally friendly practices such as reuse/recycle. My fellow, Uzbek friends say that Americans are freedom-lovers,’ free to express themselves,’ and ‘open-minded.’ To that I can add that Americans adore their country and are real patriots of their native land. They do not know limits. For example, a 46-year-old can decide to go to college to get a bachelor’s degree. They also love money and spend most of their time earning and saving. At the same time, they like recreational activities a lot, such as sports, travel, etc. Also, they are into the ‘political correctness’ thing a lot. Americans are very ‘environmentally conscious,’ meaning they care about the environment and ecology a lot and enforce environmentally friendly practices such as reuse/recycle.

22 International Perspectives on U.S. Americans Japan Americans have high self-esteem and respect others’ individuality. One of the things that I found interesting or odd about U.S. Americans after I came to the United States is that they seem to be busy all the time and proud to tell people how busy they are. I sometimes felt as if they were implying that they were too busy with other things to be bothered with me. They seem to be very friendly and easy-going, but you have to make an appointment for whatever you do with them, even going out for coffee with friends sometimes. Otherwise, people would leave you saying, ‘I gotta go.’ It took awhile for me to get used to it. Americans have high self-esteem and respect others’ individuality. One of the things that I found interesting or odd about U.S. Americans after I came to the United States is that they seem to be busy all the time and proud to tell people how busy they are. I sometimes felt as if they were implying that they were too busy with other things to be bothered with me. They seem to be very friendly and easy-going, but you have to make an appointment for whatever you do with them, even going out for coffee with friends sometimes. Otherwise, people would leave you saying, ‘I gotta go.’ It took awhile for me to get used to it.

23 International Perspectives on U.S. Americans Kyrgyzstan Many people from former Soviet Union countries would say, ‘People in the USA are very friendly, but they hardly be real friends’ or ‘Americans are very busy people and hardly have time for socialization with each other.’ Many people from former Soviet Union countries would say, ‘People in the USA are very friendly, but they hardly be real friends’ or ‘Americans are very busy people and hardly have time for socialization with each other.’

24 International Perspectives on U.S. Americans Mongolia I have very positive thoughts about U.S. Americans. First of all, they are very friendly. Even lf they are in a bad mood, they do their best to be friendly. Second, I think U.S. Americans are very good communicators. Talking with others and sharing information all the time seems to be important for them; however; they are forgetful. They ask you a question and you give them the answer; but when you see them again, they ask you the same question again. Third, Americans are very good at timing and planning things ahead of time. I have always been so amazed at how they plan events and activities of all types including their work and vacations. Once they plan to do something they do it no matter what. Moreover; they are good at meeting deadlines and doing things on time.

25 International Perspectives on U.S. Americans Iceland Of all the things I thought of Americans before I came, two issues have remained as still true. They are incredibly loud and take up a lot of space in public places. The sound level at an American restaurant is as high as a cliff full of birds in my country of Iceland. It is hard to pass Americans on the sidewalk because they usually take up half the space themselves just by the way they walk and swing their arms. Every time I go home to Iceland, I’m stopped by someone who tells me I’m taking up too much space on the sidewalk! Of all the things I thought of Americans before I came, two issues have remained as still true. They are incredibly loud and take up a lot of space in public places. The sound level at an American restaurant is as high as a cliff full of birds in my country of Iceland. It is hard to pass Americans on the sidewalk because they usually take up half the space themselves just by the way they walk and swing their arms. Every time I go home to Iceland, I’m stopped by someone who tells me I’m taking up too much space on the sidewalk!

26 For reflection and discussion Were you surprised at any of the comments? Were you surprised at any of the comments? Many of us grew up with adults trying to teach us the golden rule (Do unto others as you would have them do unto you). While this works pretty well with people from the same cultural group, it does not necessarily work well in crossing cultures. Instead, consider the Platinum Rule in which you “do unto others as they themselves would have done unto them” (M. Bennett, 1999, p. 213). Many of us grew up with adults trying to teach us the golden rule (Do unto others as you would have them do unto you). While this works pretty well with people from the same cultural group, it does not necessarily work well in crossing cultures. Instead, consider the Platinum Rule in which you “do unto others as they themselves would have done unto them” (M. Bennett, 1999, p. 213). How might you go about discovering how people in your host culture would like to be treated? How might you go about discovering how people in your host culture would like to be treated?

27 From The Identification and Assessment of Intercultural Competence as a Student Outcome of Internationalization at Institutions of Higher Education in the United StatesThe Identification and Assessment of Intercultural Competence as a Student Outcome of Internationalization at Institutions of Higher Education in the United States by Dr. Darla K. Deardorff, Raleigh NC: North Carolina State University, 2004 Intercultural Competence

28 Resources

29 Maximizing Study Abroad

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