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KNOW THY IMPACT… IMPROVING PERFORMANCE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

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Presentation on theme: "KNOW THY IMPACT… IMPROVING PERFORMANCE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 KNOW THY IMPACT… IMPROVING PERFORMANCE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

2 KNOW THY IMPACT…IMPROVING PERFORMANCE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES  A presentation for Special Education Administrator’s Conference September, 2014 TarTarA Conference Center  By the Office of Special Education, Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education  Pam Williams, Coordinator, Special Education Services  Ginger Henry, Director, Effective Practices

3 Know Thy Impact—Making Learning Visible in Missouri  What are we doing?  Why are we doing it?  Why do we think it will work?  How can I get started? Where are we going? How are we getting there? How are we doing? Hattie, The Power of Feedback

4 What are we doing? MISSOURI COLLABORATIVE WORK … The critical elements to drive the improvement efforts necessary to bring about positive results for all students, but especially students with disabilities…  High expectations  Clear vision  A few focused, high-impact goals  Frequent progress monitoring  Effective use of data  Effective teaching/learning practices  Collaborative teams focused on data

5 Missouri Collaborative Work (CW)  Initiated in School Year  Invited buildings in districts from all 9 RPDC regions  Must have a measurable number of SWDs  Not a Priority or Focus building  Not in an unaccredited district  Must be committed to collaborative implementation  Work supported by regional center staff and grants to participating buildings from Office of Special Education

6 Desired outcome from the Missouri Collaborative Work: Improved outcomes for all students, but especially for students with disabilities Teachers and administrators will implement collaborative data teams to assist one another to:  implement effective teaching/learning practices  develop and administer common formative assessments that measure the effectiveness of instruction and student mastery of learning objectives, and;  use data-based decision-making to guide team decisions about classroom learning and instruction.

7 What are the benefits of participation?  Aligned with Missouri Teacher/Leader standards and Missouri Learning Standards.  Builds a common language in the building.  The collaborative process builds the capacity of the building to conduct much of its own routine training and learning.  Builds a toolbox of effective teaching/learning practices in each building to which all teachers can demonstrate a high level of effectiveness.  All schools will get access to a pool of formative assessments aligned to the Missouri academic learning standards for use in subsequent years.  Additional funds help defray the costs of teacher time or substitutes.  All content areas will likely benefit.  If implemented with integrity, student achievement will increase at a faster rate.

8 More benefits…  Supportive model—Weight Watchers  Helps maintain focus  Improves chances of implementing with high fidelity  Outside support to help solve problems  Will develop regional and state ability to share practices, lesson plans, formative assessments, etc. which should cut down on time and costs for districts  Will contribute to building a scalable and sustainable model to improve outcomes for all students in all districts

9 CW District/building participation 9 Collaborative Work Participation Data by Year * A. Total Districts Participating B. Total Buildings Participating Early Childhood Buildings Elementary Buildings (excluding K-8 districts) K-8 Districts only Middle School Buildings High School Buildings C. Total Student Enrollment (PK-12 (excluding K-8 districts) Students with Disabilities (PK-21 (excluding K-8 districts) D. Total Student Enrollment (K-8 districts only) Students with Disabilities (K-8 districts only) E. Total Staff in Participating Buildings Regular Education Teachers Special Education Teachers Administrators Percentage of Total State-wide Participating * ParticipatedState Total% ParticipatedParticipatedState Total % ParticipatedParticipatingState Total% Participating A. Total Districts Participating % % % B. Total Buildings Participating % % % 1. Early Childhood Buildings0430%1432%3437% 2. Elementary Buildings (excluding K-8 districts) % % % 3. K-8 Districts only1731%1731%117315% 4. Middle School Buildings293508% % % 5. High School Buildings195823%515829%545829% C. Total Student Enrollment (PK-12 (excluding K-8 districts) % % % 1. Students with Disabilities (PK-21 (excluding K-8 districts) % % % D. Total Student Enrollment (K-8 districts only) % % % 1. Students with Disabilities (K-8 districts only) % % % E. Total Staff in Participating Buildings % % % 1. Regular Education Teachers % % % 2. Special Education Teachers % % % 3. Administrators % % % *Enrollment and staff counts projected based on data Data Source: Core Data, as of 6/2/2014

10 Increased student learning Classroom/ Building Educators Regional Professional Development State Education Agency High quality professional development content, materials, and structures Fidelity of delivery and content Fidelity of implementation Training and coaching Shared learning Effective teaching/ learning practices

11 Missouri Teaching/ Learning Packages 19 Learning Packages

12 Why are we doing this? LET’S LOOK AT THE DATA…

13 Where we were & where we are… a look at the data

14 Department Vision  The vision of the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is to be one of the Top 10 states in performance outcomes by the year The vision of the Statewide System of Support is to provide essential supports for all Missouri districts and schools to succeed at levels which allow the state to reach its vision.

15 10 by 20 Plan Goals  All Missouri students will graduate college and career ready.  All Missouri children will enter kindergarten prepared to be successful in school.  Missouri will prepare, develop, and support effective educators.  The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education will improve departmental efficiency and operational effectiveness.

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22 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Percentage of students scoring at or above proficient AreaGrade% Proficient% Not ProficientRank Math441%59%24 th Math832%68%33 rd Reading434%66%22 nd Reading835%65%20 th Science840%60%18th

23 Performance of Subpopulations Communication Arts--MAP AreaNumber TestedProficiency for Non-Subpop Proficiency for Subpop GAP All514, % Black84, %32.9%26.3% IEP66, %26.4%32.7% ELL13, %23.0%32.7% Econ. Deprived247, %40.8%27.1% Not Black, IEP, ELL, F/R 222, %

24 Performance of Subpopulations Mathematics- MAP AreaNumber TestedProficiency for Non-Subpop Proficiency for Subpop GAP All526, % Black86, %29.7%29.1% IEP64, %29.3%28.2% ELL13, %31.8%22.8% Econ. Deprived249, %40.6%25.6% Not Black, IEP, ELL, F/R 232, %

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26 And for all you World Cup fans: How does the US stacks up academically on the PISA versus Soccer Rankings?

27 Why do we think this will work to accelerate student achievement?

28 Why do we think this will work?  Recent research has shown us that there are some teaching/learning practices that are highly effective (Hattie, 2008 & 2011)  Moving Your Numbers work by National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) shows us there are certain effective practices that, when implemented deeply by teachers/leaders, will dramatically impact student performance  The Collaborative Work is aligned to the Missouri Teacher/Leader Standards and supports implementation of the Missouri Learning Standards

29 Where’s the evidence?.....  Recent research includes:  Hattie, J. (2008). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta- analyses relating to achievement. Routledge.  Hattie, J. (2011). Visible Learning For Teachers: Maximizing Impact On Learning, Routledge.  Hattie, J & Yates, G. (2014) Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn, Routledge.  Google & Utube—John Hattie/Visible Learning  National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO), Moving Your Numbers.  [PDF] Moving Your nuMbers Page 1. 2 Cover Moving Your nuMbers Five Districts Share How They Used Assessment and Accountability to... Page 3. MOVING YOUR NUMBERS k Text VersionMoving Your nuMbersText Version

30 From____ to Great Dr. John Hattie: Schools that doubled their performance followed a similar set of strategies that included:  Goal setting  Analyzing student data  Using formative assessments  Collectively reviewing evidence on good instruction  Using time more productively

31 John Hattie—”Visible Learning”  “When investigating the continuum of achievement, there is remarkable generality—remarkable because of the preponderance of educational researchers and teachers who argue for treating students individually, and for dealing with curriculum areas as if there were unique teaching methods associated with English, mathematics, and such. The findings from this synthesis apply, reasonably systematically, to all age groups, all curriculum areas, and to most teachers.”  What “some” teachers do matters—those who teach in a most deliberate and visible manner.

32 Hattie’s Eight Mind Frames for Educators : 1. My fundamental task is to evaluate the effect of my teaching on students ’ learning and achievement. 2. The success and failure of my students ’ learning is about what I do or don ’ t do. I am a change agent. 3. I want to talk more about learning than teaching. 4. Assessment is about my impact. 5. I teach through dialogue not monologue. 6. I enjoy the challenge and never retreat to “ doing my best ”. 7. It ’ s my role to develop positive relationships in class and staffrooms. 8. I inform all about the language of learning.

33 Effect Size  Effect Size is a common expression of the magnitude of study outcomes for many types of outcome variables, such as school achievement. An effect size of d=1.0 indicates an increase of one standard deviation on the outcome (a standard deviation increase is typically associated with advancing children’s achievement by two to three years, improving the rate of learning by 50%, or a correlation between some variable and achievement of approximately r=0.50. In implementing a new program, an d=1.0 would mean that, on average, students receiving the treatment would exceed 84% of students not receiving the treatment.

34 Effect Size— pretend this is a standard curve  .40

35 Spaced vs. Massed Practice (.71 effect size)

36 Feedback Rank 10th.73 effect size

37 Reciprocal Teaching (.74 effect size)

38 Assessment Capable Learners Hattie, J. (2009). Visible Learning. New York: Routledge Hattie, J. (2012). Visible Learning for Teaachers. New York: Routledge (1.44 effect size) Off the Charts!

39 Moving your numbers… Districts that have “moved their numbers” for all children have or are engaged in developing district-wide processes that allow for more collective use of relevant data to make smarter decisions, including the ongoing assessment of teaching and learning at the classroom, school, and district levels. These processes include the development, implementation, and ongoing use of teacher-developed formative assessments, and the use of grade-level/departmental/course, and vertical teams to collaboratively score these shared assessments and plan for shared instruction. They also include the use of building and district benchmark assessments. Fullan (2008) states that principals working directly with teachers in the use of data is more than twice as powerful as any other leadership dimension, and Leithwood and Jantzi (2008) found that the reliability for assessing student learning and district decision making was one critical characteristic of effective districts. What Matters Most: Key Practices Guide, National Center on Educational Outcomes

40 What Matters Most: Key Practices Guide (National Center for Educational Outcomes)  Key Practice 1: Use Data Well  Key Practice 2: Focus Your Goals  Key Practice 3: Select and Implement Shared Instructional Practices  Key Practice 4: Implement Deeply  Key Practice 5: Monitor and Provide Feedback and Support  Key Practice 6: Inquire and Learn

41 Desired outcome from the Missouri Collaborative Work: Improved outcomes for all students Teachers and administrators will implement collaborative data teams to assist one another to:  implement effective teaching/learning practices  develop and administer common formative assessments that measure the effectiveness of instruction and student mastery of learning objectives, and;  use data-based decision-making to guide team decisions about classroom learning and instruction.

42 How can you get started?  Participation in CW is currently limited to existing districts and buildings, HOWEVER…  RPDCs are all trained in the foundation pieces of the work—  Collaborative Data Teams  Data-based Decision-making  Common Formative Assessments  Your local RPDC can begin working with your district/building on these foundation pieces (this is the place to start anyway), THEN  In next few months the effective teaching/learning packages will be available in DIY form &/or facilitated by your RPDC

43 Can We Get It Done? I always thought that record would stand until it was broken—Yogi Berra

44 For more information…  See “Where’s the Evidence” slide above See “Where’s the Evidence” slide above  sail.org/ sail.org/  learning.org/ learning.org/  umbers.org/what- matters-most umbers.org/what- matters-most 44

45 Questions?

46 Hattie—Visible Learning INFLUENCE IMPACT Ability grouping/tracking/streaming HighMedium Low Acceleration (for example, skipping a year)High MediumLow Comprehension programsHigh MediumLow Concept mappingHigh MediumLow Cooperative vs individualistic learning High Medium Low Direct instruction High Medium Low FeedbackHigh MediumLow Gender (male compared with female achievement) HighMedium Low Home environment High Medium Low

47 Hattie—continued INFLUENCE IMPACT Individualizing instruction HighMedium Low Influence of peers High Medium Low Matching teaching with student learning styles HighMedium Low Meta-cognitive strategy programsHigh MediumLow Phonics instruction High Medium Low Professional development on student achievement High Medium Low Providing formative evaluation to teachersHigh MediumLow Providing worked examples High Medium Low Reciprocal teachingHigh MediumLow Reducing class size HighMedium Low

48 Hattie--continued INFLUENCE IMPACT Retention (holding back a year) HighMedium Low Student control over learning HighMedium Low Student expectationsHigh MediumLow Teacher credibility in eyes of the studentsHigh MediumLow Teacher expectations High Medium Low Teacher subject matter knowledge HighMedium Low Teacher-student relationshipsHigh MediumLow Using simulations and gaming High Medium Low Vocabulary programsHigh MediumLow Whole language programs HighMedium Low Within-class grouping HighMedium Low


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