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An Introduction to NTS Traffic Nets and The National Traffic System Prepared for Ham Radio University January 9,2011.

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1 An Introduction to NTS Traffic Nets and The National Traffic System Prepared for Ham Radio University January 9,2011

2 An Introduction to NTS Traffic Nets and The National Traffic System Presented by Jim Kettyle, KC2LEB Net Manager, Big Apple Traffic Net And Mike Patino, N2BMU NLI Section Traffic Manager

3 National Traffic System (NTS) Messaging Basics What is the National Traffic System? What is the National Traffic System? Brief History of the NTS Brief History of the NTS Advantages of NTS Messaging Advantages of NTS Messaging NTS Hierarchy and modes NTS Hierarchy and modes NLI NTS Structure NLI NTS Structure The ARRL Radiogram Form The ARRL Radiogram Form ARL Abbreviated Texts ARL Abbreviated Texts How to Deliver an NTS Message How to Deliver an NTS Message Local NTS Contacts & Nets Local NTS Contacts & Nets Additional Resources Additional Resources Acknowledgements Acknowledgements

4 The NTS is a field organization of the ARRL (American Radio Relay League) which was formed to pass formal written messages (traffic) from any point in the United States to any other point. The NTS has it origins in the earliest days of radio as indicated by the name, "American Radio Relay League". These messages, which are put in a standard format called a "radiogram", are relayed from one ham to another, using a variety of modes, including voice, Morse code, radio teletype, or packet. The message is ultimately delivered to the addressee by an NTS operator who lives fairly close to the recipient, either by telephone, mail, or hand delivery (uncommon). The NTS is a field organization of the ARRL (American Radio Relay League) which was formed to pass formal written messages (traffic) from any point in the United States to any other point. The NTS has it origins in the earliest days of radio as indicated by the name, "American Radio Relay League". These messages, which are put in a standard format called a "radiogram", are relayed from one ham to another, using a variety of modes, including voice, Morse code, radio teletype, or packet. The message is ultimately delivered to the addressee by an NTS operator who lives fairly close to the recipient, either by telephone, mail, or hand delivery (uncommon). During disasters or other emergencies, radiograms are used to communicate information critical to saving lives or property, or to inquire about the health or welfare of a disaster victim. During these times, the NTS works in concert with ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Services) and other emergency and disaster relief organizations, such as the American Red Cross and The Salvation Army. But even when there is no emergency, the NTS operates every day and is used by thousands of people -- hams and non-hams -- to send and receive brief messages of a personal, non-commercial nature, such as birthday greetings, congratulations on a special event, or wishes for a speedy recovery. Subject to international treaties governing "third party" messages, many foreign countries also allow their hams to exchange radiograms with US hams. During disasters or other emergencies, radiograms are used to communicate information critical to saving lives or property, or to inquire about the health or welfare of a disaster victim. During these times, the NTS works in concert with ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Services) and other emergency and disaster relief organizations, such as the American Red Cross and The Salvation Army. But even when there is no emergency, the NTS operates every day and is used by thousands of people -- hams and non-hams -- to send and receive brief messages of a personal, non-commercial nature, such as birthday greetings, congratulations on a special event, or wishes for a speedy recovery. Subject to international treaties governing "third party" messages, many foreign countries also allow their hams to exchange radiograms with US hams. What is the National Traffic System (NTS)?

5 The “RELAY” in American Radio Relay League (ARRL) The “RELAY” in American Radio Relay League (ARRL) Started in 1915 as the formal ARRL system to relay messages around the country Started in 1915 as the formal ARRL system to relay messages around the country Operational Modes: CW, Voice, other Digital Modes: RTTY, Packet, WinLink, Operational Modes: CW, Voice, other Digital Modes: RTTY, Packet, WinLink, NTS and Amateur Radio Emergency Services (ARES) NTS and Amateur Radio Emergency Services (ARES) Requirements to join: Any level Ham license & interest Requirements to join: Any level Ham license & interest ARRL Field Organization Appointments: Official Relay Station (ORS), Digital Relay Station (DRS) & Section Traffic Manager (STM). ARRL Field Organization Appointments: Official Relay Station (ORS), Digital Relay Station (DRS) & Section Traffic Manager (STM).

6 History Since the dawn of radio the handling of messages accurately and speedily has been held in highest esteem. In the early days, The range of the average spark gap station varied from 5 miles to 10 miles. As better antenna systems, receivers, and higher power rotary spark gap transmitters evolved, distances of 400 miles and more could be achieved as early as 1914 by the better stations operating on 200 meters and down. Obviously, longer distance communications could not be achieved reliably without relays. Since the dawn of radio the handling of messages accurately and speedily has been held in highest esteem. In the early days, The range of the average spark gap station varied from 5 miles to 10 miles. As better antenna systems, receivers, and higher power rotary spark gap transmitters evolved, distances of 400 miles and more could be achieved as early as 1914 by the better stations operating on 200 meters and down. Obviously, longer distance communications could not be achieved reliably without relays. In the 1920’s and 30’s organized traffic was handled by individual stations called “Trunk Lines”. They were operated on fixed frequencies supplied by the ARRL. This was the only way of routing traffic on an individual sked basis. There were fourteen trunk lines that criss-crossed the United States and Canada. Numerous independent lines were organized but not affiliated with the ARRL. During World War II radio silence was mandated. After World War II the trunk line system was reinstated but due to many conflicts and other problems the ARRL organized and started operating the National Traffic System in It was authored by George Hart, W1NJM. The early years of NTS were not without its problems as many of the old timers tried to hold onto the old ways. Finally The NTS caught on and now over sixty years later is still the official traffic system of the ARRL. The six hundred plus NTS nets of today are a far cry from what existed back on October 1, The NTS is known as the tightest operating organization in Amateur Radio, yet, one of the friendliest.

7 History The American Radio Relay League was founded by Hiram P. Maxim primarily as a long distance radio relay system. By the end of 1915, over 600 stations in almost every state and province had been appointed as Official Relay Stations whose operating standards were kept very high. The technical capability had been present for a long time before; but it is most definitely the organizational structure created by the ARRL that quickly increased the distance a message could travel from 50 Miles in early 1914 to reliable transcontinental messages by February 1917 The American Radio Relay League was founded by Hiram P. Maxim primarily as a long distance radio relay system. By the end of 1915, over 600 stations in almost every state and province had been appointed as Official Relay Stations whose operating standards were kept very high. The technical capability had been present for a long time before; but it is most definitely the organizational structure created by the ARRL that quickly increased the distance a message could travel from 50 Miles in early 1914 to reliable transcontinental messages by February 1917

8 History The commercial communications systems at that time were fragile and often made unusable during disasters. Amateurs even in their dawn proved their worth to those communities which found themselves helpless without emergency communications The commercial communications systems at that time were fragile and often made unusable during disasters. Amateurs even in their dawn proved their worth to those communities which found themselves helpless without emergency communications Operation then was strictly by Morse code and suffered under the worst combinations of noise, poor receiver selectivity, frequency unstable transmitters and receivers, poor receiver sensitivity, etc. Operation then was strictly by Morse code and suffered under the worst combinations of noise, poor receiver selectivity, frequency unstable transmitters and receivers, poor receiver sensitivity, etc. A message was handled with almost a feeling of sacred trust by dedicated and skilled operators. A message from coast to coast often had to be painstakingly relayed 8 times or more. To "botch" or delay such a message was not looked at very kindly by "the brethren". An operator was judged not so much for the amount of messages that he could handle nor the "sweetness" of his fist as much as how accurate and reliable of a relay he proved to be. A message was handled with almost a feeling of sacred trust by dedicated and skilled operators. A message from coast to coast often had to be painstakingly relayed 8 times or more. To "botch" or delay such a message was not looked at very kindly by "the brethren". An operator was judged not so much for the amount of messages that he could handle nor the "sweetness" of his fist as much as how accurate and reliable of a relay he proved to be. It was a high priority to have an efficient continental system established not only for amateur radio communications but for public service and disaster communications. It was a high priority to have an efficient continental system established not only for amateur radio communications but for public service and disaster communications. Packet radio forwarding, although made possible only as recently as late 1984 appears as a natural choice to continue this fine tradition, as it is proving both accurate, fast, and more and more reliable. Packet radio forwarding, although made possible only as recently as late 1984 appears as a natural choice to continue this fine tradition, as it is proving both accurate, fast, and more and more reliable.

9 History For accuracy and efficiency, a specific format was eventually determined to be the most effective. For accuracy and efficiency, a specific format was eventually determined to be the most effective. The standard NTS format in its present form is almost identical with that which also evolved in a parallel manner in the military and the commercial message services which, by the way, were for the most part staffed by hams as well. The standard NTS format in its present form is almost identical with that which also evolved in a parallel manner in the military and the commercial message services which, by the way, were for the most part staffed by hams as well. The present day National Traffic System (NTS) evolved out of this eighty old public service and disaster communication tradition. The present day National Traffic System (NTS) evolved out of this eighty old public service and disaster communication tradition. The NTS is still sponsored by the American Radio Relay League and features an orderly method of reliably and responsibly moving messages across the continent on a daily basis as a public service through a system of voice and CW nets and now also packet radio forwarding systems. The NTS is still sponsored by the American Radio Relay League and features an orderly method of reliably and responsibly moving messages across the continent on a daily basis as a public service through a system of voice and CW nets and now also packet radio forwarding systems.

10 Advantages of NTS Messaging Wireless! Send them from anywhere. Wireless! Send them from anywhere. Use a little HT or a big base station Use a little HT or a big base station Standard Format Standard Format Accountability Accountability NTS Nets meet daily NTS Nets meet daily Speed digipeater vs. (Not in terms of today’s technology) Speed digipeater vs. (Not in terms of today’s technology) When all else fails… When all else fails… Fun, good practice & helpful! Fun, good practice & helpful!

11 How are NTS Messages Handled? Messages can originate from either hams or non-hams. Non-hams who would like to send a radiogram should contact a ham friend or neighbor can put them in touch with a local NTS operator. There is no charge for a Radiogram. Radiograms are one way hams serve the public, and they are welcomed as a way to train new traffic handlers and keep the experienced handlers in practice. Messages can originate from either hams or non-hams. Non-hams who would like to send a radiogram should contact a ham friend or neighbor can put them in touch with a local NTS operator. There is no charge for a Radiogram. Radiograms are one way hams serve the public, and they are welcomed as a way to train new traffic handlers and keep the experienced handlers in practice. Messages are usually relayed using a system of “Nets". Nets are on- the-air meetings of message handlers at an appointed time and a designated frequency. There are four levels of nets, each covering broader territory -- local, section, regional, and area. Local nets relay messages to and from the Section nets; Section nets to the Region nets; Region nets to the Area nets. These nets are held throughout the day in order to move messages around the country. (Only designated operators participate in the Region and Area nets. These nets are not open for general participation.) Messages are usually relayed using a system of “Nets". Nets are on- the-air meetings of message handlers at an appointed time and a designated frequency. There are four levels of nets, each covering broader territory -- local, section, regional, and area. Local nets relay messages to and from the Section nets; Section nets to the Region nets; Region nets to the Area nets. These nets are held throughout the day in order to move messages around the country. (Only designated operators participate in the Region and Area nets. These nets are not open for general participation.)

12 NTS Hierarchy and Modes US and Canada organized into Area, Region, and Local Nets US and Canada organized into Area, Region, and Local Nets 3 Areas 3 Areas 12 Regions 12 Regions Traffic Flow: Traffic Flow: Section/ Local Nets Region Nets Area Nets TCC Region Nets Section / Local Nets VHF/UHF Phone, HF Phone, CW, Digital HF Phone, CW, Digital US and Canada organized into Area, Region, and Local Nets US and Canada organized into Area, Region, and Local Nets 3 Areas 3 Areas 12 Regions 12 Regions Traffic Flow: Traffic Flow:

13 3 NTS Areas PAN CAN EAN

14 StateRegionArea CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VE 1RNEAN NJ, NY 2RNEAN DE, DC, MD, PA 3RNEAN FL, GA, NC, PR, SC, VI, VA 4RNEAN MI, OH, WV 8RNEAN LB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, PQ 11RNEAN AL, AR, LA, MS, OK, TN, TX 5RNCAN IL, IN, KY, WI 9RNCAN IA, KS, MB, MN, MO, NE, ND, NWT, SK, SD 10RNCAN CA, GU, HI, NV 6RNPAN AK, AB, BC, ID, MT, NWT, OR, WA 7RNPAN AZ, CO, NM, UT, WY 12RNPAN States/Provinces, Regions and Areas

15 StateRegionArea CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VE 1RNEAN NJ, NY 2RNEAN DE, DC, MD, PA 3RNEAN FL, GA, NC, PR, SC, VI, VA 4RNEAN MI, OH, WV 8RNEAN LB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, PQ 11RNEAN EASTERN AREA NETS

16 2 ND Region NTS Nets NY Nets NY Nets NLI NLI ENY ENY WNY WNY Hudson Valley Hudson Valley NJ Nets NJ Nets NNJ NNJ SNJ SNJ

17 NTS Hierarchy and Modes Section/ Local Nets Region Nets Area Nets TCC Region Nets Section / Local Nets VHF/UHF Phone, HF Phone, CW, Digital HF Phone, CW, Digital TCC (Transcontinental Communications Corps) (National) TCC (Transcontinental Communications Corps) (National) EAN (Eastern Area Nets) (Area) EAN (Eastern Area Nets) (Area) Hudson Valley Net (HVN) (Regional) Hudson Valley Net (HVN) (Regional) Second District Net (SDN) (Regional) Second District Net (SDN) (Regional) Big Apple Traffic Net (Local) Big Apple Traffic Net (Local) Nassau County Traffic Net (Local) Nassau County Traffic Net (Local)

18 2RN Sections and Divisions StateDivisionSections New Jersey HudsonNNJ AtlanticSNJ New York Hudson ENY, NLI (NYC & LI) New York Atlantic NNY, WNY

19 2 nd Region NTS Nets NTS NETFREQUENCYTIME EAN7.243 LSB2:30 PM M-F 2RN3.930 LSB1:45 PM, 4:45 PM, 6:30 PM NY PHONE (NYP)7.237 / LSB1:00 PM NY PUBLIC OPS (NYPON)3.913 / LSB5:00 PM BIG APPLE Traffic Net (BATN) / (+1 MHZ) / Alternate Freq 8:00 PM NASSAU /136.57:30 PM SUFFOLK not currently active SOUTHERN DISTRICT /114.89:30 PM HUDSON VALLEY /100.07:30 PM CENTRAL NJ /162.28:00 PM CENTRAL NJ HF3.950 LSB6:00 PM NJ EARLY (MORRIS CO) /151.47:30 PM NJ LATE (BERGEN CO) / :30 PM

20 NLI Section NTS Structure Section Manager (SM) Mike / N2YBB Section Manager (SM) Mike / N2YBB Section Traffic Manager (STM) Mike / N2BMU Section Traffic Manager (STM) Mike / N2BMU NM ( Net Manager) Jim / KC2LEB (Big Apple Traffic Net) NM ( Net Manager) Jim / KC2LEB (Big Apple Traffic Net) Official Relay Station (ORS) Bob / K2TV Official Relay Station (ORS) Bob / K2TV ORS are the folks that can work across different modes and are regulars on several nets. ORS are the folks that can work across different modes and are regulars on several nets. ORS check the NTS BBS regularly. ORS check the NTS BBS regularly. ORS are required to file SAR/PSHR (/Public Service Honor Roll) every month and the only active ones at the moment are Phil and Bob. I always wanted to tap Barry KA2YDW and Adam Fine (forgot his new call) as they did both VHF FM and HF, and were both FB ops. Others would be Kevin AB2ZI, Gregg KE2SX and Bill W2ANQ. ORS are required to file SAR/PSHR (/Public Service Honor Roll) every month and the only active ones at the moment are Phil and Bob. I always wanted to tap Barry KA2YDW and Adam Fine (forgot his new call) as they did both VHF FM and HF, and were both FB ops. Others would be Kevin AB2ZI, Gregg KE2SX and Bill W2ANQ. Official Bulletin Station (OBS) OPEN Official Bulletin Station (OBS) OPEN OBS were more important prior to the internet, and were the folks who could copy info from the League and/or Statewide/Regional/Section cadre, and then relay this to the masses on VHF. I don't recall if I had anyone fill this during my tenure, but I would go for someone who had battery power, and were home during incidents. An example would be N2GA and K2DO who did an excellent job at this during the blackout in Nassau, disseminating info on LIMARC about open ARES/EMCOMM nets in the area, open gas stations, where to get ice, etc. That was impromptu, but that is what I'd look for in a candidate. OBS were more important prior to the internet, and were the folks who could copy info from the League and/or Statewide/Regional/Section cadre, and then relay this to the masses on VHF. I don't recall if I had anyone fill this during my tenure, but I would go for someone who had battery power, and were home during incidents. An example would be N2GA and K2DO who did an excellent job at this during the blackout in Nassau, disseminating info on LIMARC about open ARES/EMCOMM nets in the area, open gas stations, where to get ice, etc. That was impromptu, but that is what I'd look for in a candidate.

21 Digital Relay Station (DRS). Phil KC2UVQ Digital Relay Station (DRS). Phil KC2UVQ Unofficially, it would be John N2NSA and Lou N2RQ for providing Northeast Flexnet nodes. There are some in Suffolk, but the main backbone for NLI is basically kept alive by John N2NSA. Unofficially, it would be John N2NSA and Lou N2RQ for providing Northeast Flexnet nodes. There are some in Suffolk, but the main backbone for NLI is basically kept alive by John N2NSA. John N2NSA has been involved in building the Packet Network in the Bronx, New York City and Queens areas. He maintains and is still running the KB2VLX BBS in the Bronx and the KC2COJ BBS in far Rockaway Queens, N2NSA node in Manhattan and supplies equipment and technical expertise to the rest of the NLI section on packet operations. John N2NSA has been involved in building the Packet Network in the Bronx, New York City and Queens areas. He maintains and is still running the KB2VLX BBS in the Bronx and the KC2COJ BBS in far Rockaway Queens, N2NSA node in Manhattan and supplies equipment and technical expertise to the rest of the NLI section on packet operations. Each BBS is supported by an 8 link com port running at terminal speed of and radio speed of Backbone link user ports are at 1200 baud. Each system is a full blown BBS handling numerous amounts of mail daily 24 hours 7 days a week. Each BBS is supported by an 8 link com port running at terminal speed of and radio speed of Backbone link user ports are at 1200 baud. Each system is a full blown BBS handling numerous amounts of mail daily 24 hours 7 days a week. Charlie WA2GUG has dedicated VHF and UHF RMS Nodes on Winlink. Charlie WA2GUG has dedicated VHF and UHF RMS Nodes on Winlink. Gabe N2PQT and John N2NSA maintain VHF RMS Nodes on Winlink. Gabe N2PQT and John N2NSA maintain VHF RMS Nodes on Winlink. Other VHF /UHF RMS Nodes are K2MO in Suffolk, N1EZT in CT, N2GW in NJ, K2GE in NJ Other VHF /UHF RMS Nodes are K2MO in Suffolk, N1EZT in CT, N2GW in NJ, K2GE in NJ RMS HF Nodes RMS HF Nodes VA Beach VA Harrisburg PA Lowell MA Buffalo NY VA Beach VA Harrisburg PA Lowell MA Buffalo NY Many folks have APRS which is capable of sending and receiving messages. Many folks have APRS which is capable of sending and receiving messages. Do not use APRS for NTS, but it's great for informal traffic! Do not use APRS for NTS, but it's great for informal traffic! PacLink PacLink NLI Section NTS Structure

22 Local Nets for NLI Section Big Apple VHF Traffic Net: 8pm on /+1MHz/136.5 tone Big Apple VHF Traffic Net: 8pm on /+1MHz/136.5 tone Nassau County Traffic Net: 7:30pm on /-600 kHz/136.5 tone Nassau County Traffic Net: 7:30pm on /-600 kHz/136.5 tone New Jersey VHF Net (Early): 7:30pm on /-600 kHz/151.4 tone New Jersey VHF Net (Early): 7:30pm on /-600 kHz/151.4 tone New Jersey VHF Net (Late): 10:30pm /-600 kHz/141.3 tone New Jersey VHF Net (Late): 10:30pm /-600 kHz/141.3 tone

23 The Section Manager (SM) The Section Manager (SM) The Section Manager is accountable for carrying out the duties of the office in accordance with ARRL policies established by the Board of Directors and shall act in the best interests of Amateur Radio. In discharging these responsibilities, the Section Manager: The Section Manager is accountable for carrying out the duties of the office in accordance with ARRL policies established by the Board of Directors and shall act in the best interests of Amateur Radio. In discharging these responsibilities, the Section Manager: Recruits, appoints, and supervises section-level staff to administer the Field Organization's principal areas of responsibility in the section. These areas are emergency communications, message traffic relay, technical activity / problem solving, volunteer monitoring, government relations, public relations in the general community, information services for amateurs, and cooperation with affiliated clubs. Recruits, appoints, and supervises section-level staff to administer the Field Organization's principal areas of responsibility in the section. These areas are emergency communications, message traffic relay, technical activity / problem solving, volunteer monitoring, government relations, public relations in the general community, information services for amateurs, and cooperation with affiliated clubs. Appoints qualified ARRL members in the section to other volunteer positions in support of Field Organization objectives, and may authorize section-level staff to make such appointments. Appoints qualified ARRL members in the section to other volunteer positions in support of Field Organization objectives, and may authorize section-level staff to make such appointments. Keeps well informed concerning matters of ARRL policy so as to administer the Field Organization in accordance with current policy and to provide correct information in response to members' inquiries. Keeps well informed concerning matters of ARRL policy so as to administer the Field Organization in accordance with current policy and to provide correct information in response to members' inquiries. Supervises the activities of the section-level staff, monitors the performance of the Field Organization volunteers, and provides guidance as necessary to ensure that appointees act in the best interests of Amateur Radio and in accordance with ARRL policies. Supervises the activities of the section-level staff, monitors the performance of the Field Organization volunteers, and provides guidance as necessary to ensure that appointees act in the best interests of Amateur Radio and in accordance with ARRL policies. Maintains liaison with the Division Director; makes periodic reports to the Director regarding the status of Section activities; receives information and guidance pertaining to matters of mutual concern and interest from the Director; serves on the Division Cabinet and renders advice as requested by the Director. Maintains liaison with the Division Director; makes periodic reports to the Director regarding the status of Section activities; receives information and guidance pertaining to matters of mutual concern and interest from the Director; serves on the Division Cabinet and renders advice as requested by the Director. NLI Section NTS Structure

24

25 Message Format The ARRL Radiogram

26 The RADIOGRAM Form

27 704 R C N2GS 14 CHESTER NJ 1830 JUL 2 GREG SZPUNAR N2GS JOE SMITH KC2XXY 1234 SECOND ST SUMMIT NJ a ustin AK2US 7/2/ EDT a ustin AK2US 7/2/ EDT THIS IS THE ARRL RADIOGRAM FORM XRAY DETAIL TO FOLLOW XRAY HAVE FUN 73

28 ARRL Radiogram Form Preamble: Message number, precedence, HX (optional handling code), station of origin, check (text word count), place of origin, time filed (optional), and date. Preamble: Message number, precedence, HX (optional handling code), station of origin, check (text word count), place of origin, time filed (optional), and date. Addressee: Name, call sign (if a ham), full street address, city, 2-letter state abbreviation, zip code (very important) & telephone (be sure to include area code). Addressee: Name, call sign (if a ham), full street address, city, 2-letter state abbreviation, zip code (very important) & telephone (be sure to include area code). This Radio Message was received at: Station identification and location. This Radio Message was received at: Station identification and location. Text: 25 words maximum, 5 per line; Use the word “xray” for a period (.) and “query” for a question mark (?). Last word in salutation (i.e., “73”, “Love”, etc.) Text: 25 words maximum, 5 per line; Use the word “xray” for a period (.) and “query” for a question mark (?). Last word in salutation (i.e., “73”, “Love”, etc.) Signature: (Write-in above REC’D block) Name & call sign of person who wrote the message – include full phone number if not a Ham or if new to NTS. Signature: (Write-in above REC’D block) Name & call sign of person who wrote the message – include full phone number if not a Ham or if new to NTS. REC’D & SENT: Record the names and call sign of the person you rec’d the message from and/or sent/forwarded the message to, along with the date & time (EST/EDT or Z). REC’D & SENT: Record the names and call sign of the person you rec’d the message from and/or sent/forwarded the message to, along with the date & time (EST/EDT or Z).

29 Number  Assigned by the message originator  No standard way of numbering messages  Consecutive (1, 2, 3..., starting over at the new year or monthly)  Order by month & number (507 = 7th you originated in May; = 244th message you originated in November Precedence (E, P, W, or R)  E = Emergency (life or death urgency in a declared emergency)  P = Priority (official traffic in a declared emergency)  W = Health & Welfare (used only in a declared emergency)  R = Routine (everything else – most frequently used) Radiogram Form Detail (1 of 6) 704 R C N2GS 14 CHESTER NJ 1830 JUL 2

30 1.(Optional) HX or Handling Code – A, B, C, D, E, F or G A.Collect landline delivery authorized within ___ miles of addressee or unlimited if blank (A150 = collect call authorized w/in 150 miles; A = collect call authorized regardless of miles) B.Cancel message if not delivered within ___ hours of filing time & service originating station (B72 = cancel if not delivered within 72 hrs and send message to originator to notify them) C.Confirmation of delivery requested by originating station (“TOD YOUR 1014 JULY PST XRAY 73” or if issues “ARL SIXTY SEVEN 1014 PHONE INCORRECT NO REPLACEMENT FOUND SENT RADIOGRAM INSTEAD XRAY 73” D.Report your identity & time/date rec’d message plus time/date delivered or sent to another E.Delivering station to get reply from addressee and send to originator as a new message F.Hold delivery until ___ (numbered day of month) – great for birthday or anniversary messages (F14 = deliver on 14 th of the month; F1 = deliver on the 1 st of month after date filed) G.Delivery by mail or toll call not required, service originating station (often ignored). Radiogram Form Detail (2 of 6) 704 R C N2GS 14 CHESTER NJ 1830 JUL R C N2GS 14 CHESTER NJ 1830 JUL 2

31 1.Station of Origin: Call sign of station who put the message into NTS format; If N2GS prepares message 1207 for a fellow ham, then puts it onto an NTS packet BBS for relay to Vermont, the originator is... N2GS. If WB2W prepares message 23 for his non-ham neighbor then gives it to N2GS to relay to any NTS net, the originator is... WB2W. 2.Check: The word count in body text only (do not count the address or signature); precede with “ARL” if any of the ARL numbered texts are used (i.e., ARL7). 3.Place of Origin: The city & state where the message was written. 4.(Optional) Time Filed: This is not used much hr format & time zone 5.Date: Month (non-numeric – abbreviated) & day number message was created (i.e., Sep 21). Radiogram Form Detail (3 of 6) 704 R C N2GS 14 CHESTER NJ 1830 JUL R C N2GS 14 CHESTER NJ 1830 JUL 2

32 To: Name, call sign (if going to a ham), street address or P.O. Box, city, state (abbreviated) & zip code. Note: Digital and packet NTS messages are routed via zip code. Telephone Number: Be sure to include the area code and double-check the number!!! This Radio Message was received at: Your station identification, date received, and your location. More received-from detail will go in the “REC’D” block after body text and signature. Radiogram Form Detail (4 of 6) JOE SMITH KC2XXY 1234 SECOND ST SUMMIT NJ

33 Text: 25 words maximum, 5 per line; Use “xray” for a period (.) and “query” for a question mark (?). NOTE: The “Check” number in the Preamble should match the number of words in the message. Signature: There is no “Signature” field, just write-in below text;Name & call sign of author – include phone number if not a ham or if not known on an NTS net. Signature: There is no “Signature” field, just write-in below text; Name & call sign of author – include phone number if not a ham or if not known on an NTS net. Radiogram Form Detail (5 of 6) THIS IS THE ARRL RADIOGRAM FORM XRAY DETAIL TO FOLLOW XRAY HAVE FUN 73 THIS IS THE ARRL RADIOGRAM FORM XRAY DETAIL TO FOLLOW XRAY HAVE FUN 73 GREG SZPUNAR N2GS

34 REC’D: Call sign from whom you received the message and date & time of receipt. Time may be either your local time (EST/EDT) or Zulu time. Make sure date agrees with time (Zulu is 5 hours ahead of EST – can cause date to roll forward). SENT: Call sign you sent or passed the message to, or to whom you delivered it, with date & time. Also good to note delivery method for your own reference (i.e., via phone or left on Tom’s voic ). Always leave your call back number if message was left on voic ! Radiogram Form Detail (6 of 6) Austin AK2US 7/2/ EDT Austin AK2US 7/2/ EDT

35 ARL Numbered Texts Purpose & How Counted ARL Numbered Texts replace common phrases in message body text (i.e., Happy Birthday, Greetings by amateur radio, etc.) ARL Numbered Texts replace common phrases in message body text (i.e., Happy Birthday, Greetings by amateur radio, etc.) Use of ARL texts reduce total message word count – faster and more consistent transmission of text Use of ARL texts reduce total message word count – faster and more consistent transmission of text Translated before delivery of message to addressee Translated before delivery of message to addressee ARL text numbers are always spelled-out in words (i.e., ARL SEVEN or ARL FORTY SIX) ARL text numbers are always spelled-out in words (i.e., ARL SEVEN or ARL FORTY SIX) Message word count (check) is written as “ARL#” (i.e., ARL4 or ARL15) to alert operators that message includes at least one ARL numbered text. Message word count (check) is written as “ARL#” (i.e., ARL4 or ARL15) to alert operators that message includes at least one ARL numbered text.

36 ARL Numbered Texts (Examples) ARL FORTY SIX = Greetings on your birthday and best wishes for many more to come. ARL FORTY SIX = Greetings on your birthday and best wishes for many more to come. ARL FORTY SEVEN = Your message ______ to ______ delivered _______ _______UTC ARL FORTY SEVEN = Your message ______ to ______ delivered _______ _______UTC ARL FIFTY = Greetings by amateur radio. ARL FIFTY = Greetings by amateur radio. ARL FIFTY ONE = Greetings by amateur radio. This message is sent as a free public service by ham radio operators at _______. Am having a wonderful time. ARL FIFTY ONE = Greetings by amateur radio. This message is sent as a free public service by ham radio operators at _______. Am having a wonderful time. ARL SIXTY SEVEN = Your message number _____ undeliverable because of ______. Please advise. ARL SIXTY SEVEN = Your message number _____ undeliverable because of ______. Please advise.

37 How to Deliver an NTS Message Preferred delivery is via telephone. Preferred delivery is via telephone. Okay to leave on voic or answering machine IF you are comfortable you reached the right person. Okay to leave on voic or answering machine IF you are comfortable you reached the right person. Radiogram postcard if cannot reach by phone. Radiogram postcard if cannot reach by phone. Service originating station to inform if cannot deliver or if they requested confirmation. Service originating station to inform if cannot deliver or if they requested confirmation.

38 Record Keeping & Reporting (PSHR) Use a log sheet to keep track of your messages Use a log sheet to keep track of your messages Use a PSHR log sheet to tally monthly points for Public Service Honor Roll Use a PSHR log sheet to tally monthly points for Public Service Honor Roll Report message count (originated, sent, received & delivered) to STM monthly Report message count (originated, sent, received & delivered) to STM monthly Report PSHR totals to Section Traffic Manager Report PSHR totals to Section Traffic Manager

39 ICS-213 Form Header Header Message Message Message Signature Message Signature Message Reply Message Reply Reply Signature Reply Signature

40 ICS-213 Form About ICS-213 Form The ICS 213 General Message Form is available in: –Printed form as a single page –Printed as a two part “carbonless” form Information entered on top page is “carbon” copied to the second page Second page is used to forward message with reply to sender, top page is retained as file copy –Electronic “form” Word template (.dot) Word document (.doc) Adobe PDF file (.pdf) –May either allow electronic entry on form or form must be printed and completed by hand Other variants (WordPerfect, etc.) are also found –Training is available from your agency in using software appropriate to all electronic ICS forms in use. That training should be obtained separately from this course. –We won’t focus on penmanship, but if you’re filling out the forms manually always keep in mind the reader.

41 Radio Gram vs. ICS-213 What About National Traffic System ARL Numbered Radiograms ? ICS & RACES don’t use ARL numbered radiograms! – But, you should still know what they are… in case you RECEIVE one. They may be used in response to Red Cross DWI (Disaster Welfare Inquiry). IF sent an ARL numbered radiogram the “number” is SPELLED OUT! NO Health & Welfare traffic on OPNETS – take to LOGNET. – W is an ARES task with Red Cross. NTS / ICS Training Notes: In ARRL-NTS practice, its considered unnecessary to say the line headers NTS operators use “Initial X-Ray” to indicate the end of sentence In ICS the headers the headers are used because the receiving station may be unfamiliar with the ICS message form RACES / ICS stations use “PERIOD” to end a sentence for simplicity and clarity with the served agencies

42 Net Directory A short unfinished list of Nets that may be heard in the NLI Section A short unfinished list of Nets that may be heard in the NLI Section

43 Net NameAbbr.EasternFrequenciesManager New York State CW Net Morning Cycle 1NYS/M10:00AM 3.577CW KA2GJV 7.042CW Alt. NY PhoneNYP1:00PM S,Sn 3.925LSB AK2Z 7.235LSB Alt. Second Region Net Cycle 2 2RN/2 1:45PM 3.925LSB W2MTA 2RN/ LSB Alt. Eastern Area Net Cycle 2EAN/22:30PM M-F7.243LSBKW1U Eastern Area Net Cycle 2EAN/22:30PM S,Sn7.050CWKW1U NY Public Operations NetNYPON5:00PM 3.925LSB WB3CUF 3.913LSB Alt. Second Region Net Cycle 3 2RN/3 6:30PM 3.925LSB W2MTA 2RN/ LSB Alt. New York State CW Net Early Cycle 4NYS/E7:00PM 3.576CW KT2D 1.807CW Alt. Hudson Valley NetHVN7:30PM FM PL100 N2JBA FM PL100 Alt FM PL100 Alt. (link) Second Region Net Cycle 4 2RN/4 7:45PM 3.576CW 2RN/ CW Alt. Eastern Area Net Cycle 4EAN/48:30PM 3.577CW W2RU 1.807CW Alt. Southern District NetSDN9:30PM FM PL114.8 KC2BUV FM PL136.5 Alt FM PL114.8 Alt. Second Region Net Cycle 4 2RN/4 9:30PM 3.576CW 2RN/ CW Alt. New York State CW Net Late Cycle 4NYS/L10:00PM 3.576CW KT2D 1.825CW Alt.

44 2RN HF Nets Open to all Hams' Open to all Hams' Liaisons to/from NJ and NY Liaisons to/from NJ and NY Liaisons to EAN Liaisons to EAN Frequency (MHz) TimeMode :45 PM SSB :35 PM SSB :30 PM SSB :45 PM CW :30 PM CW

45 NNJ/SNJ Section HF Nets Open to all Hams' Open to all Hams' Frequency (MHz) TimeNameMode :00 AM NJ Morning (WE) CW :00 PM, 9AM (SU) NJPNSSB :30 PM NJ Slow Net CW :00 PM NJ Net/Early CW :00 PM NJ Net/Late CW

46 Additional Resources ARRL Net Directory – Excellent NTS reference with net listings by state ($5 from ARRL). Online version is accessible free at the ARRL web site (www.arrl.org). ARRL Net Directory – Excellent NTS reference with net listings by state ($5 from ARRL). Online version is accessible free at the ARRL web site (www.arrl.org). Public Service Communication Manual – Detailed reference on NTS message handling ($1 from ARRL), also available on ARRL web site. Public Service Communication Manual – Detailed reference on NTS message handling ($1 from ARRL), also available on ARRL web site. Morris County NJ Amateur Radio Volunteers website – see NTS section: Morris County NJ Amateur Radio Volunteers website – see NTS section: K2UL website – Dan was the Section Traffic Manager for SNJ and has a great website. K2UL website – Dan was the Section Traffic Manager for SNJ and has a great website.

47 Acknowledgements Pinkney Foster, KG6ILA Section Traffic Manager ARRL Santa Clara Valley Section whose presentation “National Traffic System (NTS) Messaging Basics” inspired the message handling components of this presentation. Jim Oberhofer, KN6PE Author of Outpost Packet Message Manager, and the resulting description included in this presentation. Mark W. Rappaport, W2EAG An Instructors guide to training Traffic Handlers. Charles Alfano, WA2GUG and Russ Logar, KC2LSB Digital Communications, Protocols, Implementation and Usage. Thanks for the Slides.

48 National Traffic System (NTS) An Introduction Originally NJ ARRL Convention April 25, 2010 Greg Szpunar, N2GS, NTS Official Relay Station, NTS Digital Relay Station Dave Struebel, WB2FTX, Section Traffic Manager ARRL Northern New Jersey Section Eastern Area Digital Coordinator, NTSD With Special Thanks to : For providing the original material and content

49 Questions? Check in to an NTS Traffic Net Today !!


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