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DAY 2. From Staff Room to Classroom Designing PD for Adult Learners Brian M. Pete Robin Fogarty & Associates.

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Presentation on theme: "DAY 2. From Staff Room to Classroom Designing PD for Adult Learners Brian M. Pete Robin Fogarty & Associates."— Presentation transcript:

1 DAY 2

2 From Staff Room to Classroom Designing PD for Adult Learners Brian M. Pete Robin Fogarty & Associates

3 Chicago Lake Front

4

5 A Metaphor

6

7 “My error would be that I confused ingredients for dinner with dinner itself.” Standards Curriculum Instruction

8

9

10

11 Discuss... The Food – Standard Metaphor

12 Close: Topic: Capture: Captivate: # __

13 Tiny Transfer Book

14 Ideas to Go... Name Date

15 Cast of Characters Magic Book 6 Levels – Stories AB Partners Four Corners – New Partners Dice - Manipulative Pointing Game CL Roles: Materials Manager Recorder Encourager Spy ABC Graffiti List Sort Label I Appreciate... Day 1 Strategies...

16 Tiny Transfer Book

17 Ideas to Go... Name Date

18

19 From Staff Room to Classroom The Four Roles of the Staff Developer

20 Birthdays...

21 Designer Presenter Facilitator Mediator PPPPPP CCCCCC IIIIII TTTTTT

22 Plan the workshop context, content and concepts for customized programs tailored to the needs of the group. Prepare the site for an optimal learning. Experience that supports adult learning theory and best practices. Provide for the “creature comforts” that make or break the workshop. Designer at the Site Designing

23 What do you do?

24 Capture the audience and get their focused attention for the session; Tell them what you’re going to do. Captivate the audience and keep them with you with expert information that enhances their understanding of the topic; Do it. Close through comments that revisit and emphasize key learnings to take away; Tell them what you did. Sage on the Stage Presenting

25 Identify a great Presenter

26 Invite active participation through collaborative structures of pairs, trios, quads as well as whole group interactions. Involve all participants in he interactions with skillful monitoring, interventions within the groups and facilitating questions. Interpret the results of the collaborations and through reflective strategies; discuss how the team worked; pluses and minuses. Facilitation Guide on the Side

27 A good facilitator is always...

28 Coach in the Field Team participants to build trusting relationships for job- embedded peer coaching, and sustained applications that structure for success. Talk is structured through dialogue and articulations opportunities that foster reflective practices. Transfer is promoted through explicit strategies for immediate, relevant and meaningful applications in the classroom. Mediating

29 Good mediators are like _____ because both _____.

30 Designer Presenter Facilitator Mediator PPPPPP CCCCCC IIIIII TTTTTT

31 Three Musketeers

32 High Tech High Touch High Thought High Tech High Touch High Thought

33 Smart Phones iPads, Laptops Tablets, Computers

34 High Tech Not so much!

35 Share a Childhood Nickname

36 Coaching Conversations

37 Each share 1 thing they will Transfer from this Staff Room to your Staff Room...

38 2 Partners Share 1 Observes

39 Propagate each strategy at least three ways...

40 Cathy, The Carrier Pigeon Propagate each strategy at least three ways...

41 Create a Team Name

42 High Tech High Touch High Thought High Tech High Touch High Thought

43 SCIENCE Astronomy Apps: Digital-Rich Tools SS Survey ELA Writing MATH 3D-Geometry “High Tech” Digital Literacy Tech Vocab Health/PE Healthy Diet Art/Music Performance Consumer ED Research

44 3-D Geometry Dragon Dictation The Night Sky Diet Controller Poll Everywhere Sketchbook Express QR Codes Wordle “APPY HOUR”

45

46 selfie noun, informal (also selfy; plural selfies) a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2013 SELFIE

47 1. Get in the spotlight 2. Frame the subject 3. Avoid ‘photobombers’ 4. Keep the background interesting 5. Apply some effects 5 Steps to Take a Good Selfie:

48 Take a Selfie

49 Laughing and Learning Retention up 50% Even an attempt at humor is effective Grace Dearborn - Conscious Teaching

50 Create “Selfie” of Dynamic Duo Send to Brian Subject Line: Team Nickname TEXT:

51 Change

52 Evolutionary or Revolutionary

53 Escalator Video

54 Change is what teachers do and think… It’s as simple and as complex as that. Sarasan in Fullan Change

55

56

57 Let’s visit some schools that are successfully riding dead horses. Let’s try a more experienced rider.

58 I think we should raise the standards for riding dead horses. I think testing the horse would help.

59 What about implementing an Individual Equestrian Plan (IEP)? The basic problem is the horse’s parents-poor breeding!

60

61

62 Change Theory

63 Change is what teachers do and think… It’s as simple and as complex as that. Sarasan in Fullan Change

64 Elevator/Escalator The times they are “achanging”!

65 The Change Game Professional Development Change in Practice Change in Beliefs Change in Student Achievement Four Cards to Move Around

66 The Change Game 1. Professional Development 2. Change in Practice 4. Change in Beliefs 3. Change in Student Achievement Research says...

67 Other Examples

68 Keys to Success Who you Know Talent LuckEffort Classroom Observations Pre Post Observation Reading Listening SpeakingWriting Literacy

69 The Training Model Joyce and Showers Student Achievement Through Staff Development

70 On a scale of 1-10… IMPACT of each element… Theory 1_2_3_4_5_6_7_8_9_10 Demonstration 1_2_3_4_5_6_7_8_9_10 Practice 1_2_3_4_5_6_7_8_9_10 Coaching 1_2_3_4_5_6_7_8_9_10 THE TRAINING MODEL

71 Percent of teachers that will transfer learning to classroom… THEORY 0% DEMONSTRATION 0% PRACTICE 5% COACHING 95% THE TRAINING MODEL Joyce and Showers

72 Percent of teachers that will transfer learning to classroom… KnowledgeSkillTransfer THEORY % DEMONSTRATION % PRACTICE % COACHING % THE TRAINING MODEL

73 Joyce and Showers’ Findings Coached adults… Practice more frequently/develop greater skill Use new strategies more appropriately Exhibit greater retention of knowledge/skills More likely to explain new strategies to students Greater cognition/think with new strategies Student Achievement Through Staff Development - ASCD 2002

74 LUNCH

75 AB Pyramid Game

76 High Five Walk

77 AB Pyramid Game

78 Vocabulary Energizer AB Pyramid Game

79 Transfer Duplicate Apply Presenter

80 Gather Movement Standards Coach

81 Designer Innovate Authentic Scaffold

82 Facilitator Expectations Good Shepard Soar

83

84 Free and Reduced Meal RatePISA Score Schools with < 10%551 Schools with %527 Schools with %502 Schools with %471 Schools with >75%446 U.S. average500 OECD average493 While the overall PISA rankings ignore such differences in the tested schools, when groupings based on the rate of free and reduced lunch are created, a direct relationship is established.

85 Country Denmark Finland Norway Belgium Switzerland Czech Republic France Netherlands Germany Australia Greece Hungary Austria Canada Japan Poland Portugal Ireland Italy United Kingdom New Zealand United States Poverty Rate 2.4% 3.4% 3.6% 6.7% 6.8% 7.2% 7.3% 9.0% 10.9% 11.6% 12.4% 13.1% 13.3% 13.6% 14.3% 14.5% 15.6% 15.7% 16.2% 16.3% 21.7% PISA Score

86 Country United States Finland Netherlands Belgium Norway Switzerland France Denmark Czech Republic Poverty Rate <10% 3.4% 9.0% 6.7% 3.6% 6.8% 7.3% 2.4% 7.2% PISA Score

87

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89

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91 S ERVE & V olley

92 What was once educationally significant, but difficult to measure, has been replaced by what is insignificant and easy to measure. So, now we test how well we have taught what we do not value. Art Costa

93 To whom is the author directing this message? Give 3 possible answers.

94 A Partners B

95 S ERVE & V olley

96 Who needs to hear this message? Explain Partner # A Agree or Disagree – Give at least 1 reason Partner #B Summarize both comments into one sentence. Partner #A Synthesize the conversation into three words or less. Partner #B

97 Higher Order Thinking Skills Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities & differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Analyze Account for literal similarities and differences. Look again; don’t miss the obvious. Investigate the hidden details of likeness & difference. Know the categories. Express in alternating or dual descriptions. Compare Contrast Begin with the big picture. Look at the elements. Extract the essence. Name the nuggets. Design a seamless image. Synthesize

98 From Staff Room to Classroom The goal of all staff development is...

99 I would say to the House, as I said to those who have joined this government: "I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat." We have before us an ordeal of the most grievous kind. We have before us many, many long months of struggle and of suffering. You ask, what is our policy? I can say: It is to wage war, by sea, land and air, with all our might and with all the strength that God can give us; to wage war against a monstrous tyranny, never surpassed in the dark, lamentable catalogue of human crime. That is our policy. You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word: It is victory, victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory, however long and hard the road may be; for without victory, there is no survival. Let that be realised; no survival for the British Empire, no survival for all that the British Empire has stood for, no survival for the urge and impulse of the ages, that mankind will move forward towards its goal. But I take up my task with buoyancy and hope. I feel sure that our cause will not be suffered to fail among men. At this time I feel entitled to claim the aid of all, and I say, "come then, let us go forward together with our united strength.” Grades 6–8 Text Exemplars Informational Texts: English Language Arts Churchill, Winston. “Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat: Address to Parliament on May 13th, 1940.” Lend Me Your Ears: Great Speeches in History, 3rd Edition. Edited by William Safire. New York: W. W. Norton, (1940) From “Winston Churchill Braces Britons to Their Task”

100 Grade 6 Standards Addressed: Key Ideas and Details Reading - Key Ideas and Details RI Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RI 7-2. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. Reading - Craft and Structure RI 7-4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. RI 7-5. Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. Reading - Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Reading

101 Grade 6 Standards Addressed: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas SL 7-4. Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. Speaking and Listening

102 Grade 6 Standards Addressed: Conventions of Standard English L 7-1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. a. Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in specific sentences. b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas. c. Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.* Vocabulary Acquisition and Use L 7-5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context. b. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of the words. c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending). Language

103 ARGUMENTATION Construct argument Develop ideas Build on others’ ideas Integrate Information Respond to others’ argument Compare arguments Explain flaws in arguments Decide if argument makes sense Decide if arguments are correct Determine domains to which an argument applies Clarify arguments Improve arguments Draw conclusions Justify conclusions

104 Coaching Conversations Walk-throughs / Look-for’s ✔ Students using complete sentences ✔ Back and forth of conversation ✔ Evidence of student reasoning

105

106 Thinking at Grade Level

107 A Standard is a Standard

108 Video Louis C.K. on David Letterman

109 Bill has 3 goldfish, he buys 2 more. How many dogs live in London?

110 That moment when you say “I don’t know what this is!” When you panic – that means you’re about to figure it out.

111 Common Core Georgia Performance Standards CCGPS

112 States that signed on to the Common Core State Standards accepted that the CCSS will account for 100% of the total number of standards in a subject area, meaning that states have the option to identify as much as 15% in additional standards once they have adopted the CCSS verbatim. (CCSSI, March 2010). The 15% rule...

113 Career & College Ready. The Goal...

114 AB Partners Talk about what you think about when you hear Career & College Ready.

115 LESS IS MORE

116 PAGE 7

117 Students Who Are College and Career Ready in Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, and Language They demonstrate independence. Students can, without significant scaffolding, comprehend and evaluate complex texts across a range of types and disciplines, and they can construct effective arguments and convey intricate or multifaceted information. Likewise, students are able independently to discern a speaker’s key points, request clarification, and ask relevant questions. They build on others’ ideas, articulate their own ideas, and confirm they have been understood. Without prompting, they demonstrate command of standard English and acquire and use a wide-ranging vocabulary. More broadly, they become self-directed learners, effectively seeking out and using resources to assist them, including teachers, peers, and print and digital reference materials.

118 AB Partners Which would be would be a challenge for your students?

119 To succeed in 21 st Century college and careers, students need to be able to: 1. Solve problems 2. Manage oneself 3. Adapt to change 4. Analyze/conceptualize 5. Reflect on /improve performance 6. Communicate 7. Work in teams 8. Create / innovate / critique 9. Engage in learning throughout life Shift from “What’s Taught” tp “What Students Need to Be Able to Do”

120 Describe: Provide a Specific Workplace Example 1 ☐ Solve problems 2 ☐ Manage oneself 3 ☐ Adapt to change 4 ☐ Analyze/conceptualize 5 ☐ Reflect on /improve performance 6 ☐ Communicate 7 ☐ Work in teams 8 ☐ Create / innovate / critique 9 ☐ Engage in learning throughout life

121 Solve Problems Create Innovate Critique Communicate Work In Teams Manage Oneself Adapt to Change Analyze Conceptualize Reflect on /Improve Performance Engage in Learning throughout Life

122 Meet and Greet Pick one, discuss what it would look like in the job place.

123 Making the Abstract Concrete

124 Applying this 21 st Century skill is like _______ Because both ________

125 Close: Topic: Capture: Captivate: # __ Career College Ready Goals AB Partner Ranking Inference Prediction Analogy

126 Prepare for the Test of Life not just for the test...

127 Thinking at Grade Level

128 How to Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core 7 Key Student Proficiencies of the New National Standards

129

130 TALK THROUGH WALK THROUGH DRIVE THROUGH

131 Chapter 1: Analyze No way of thinking or doing, however ancient, can be trusted without proof. Henry David Thoreau

132 To analyze is to separate any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements. Related terms include: Diagnose, Examine, Classify, Differentiate, Distinguish.

133 PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis.

134 Analyze In the ELA Common Core State Standards the word

135 Analyze In the ELA Common Core State Standards the word Appears 81 times...

136 SCIENCE Analyze Velocity Interdisciplinary Model SS Analyze Point of View ELA Analyze Theme MATH Analyze Statistics “Analyze” HEALTH/PE Analyze Benefits HEALTH/PE Analyze Benefits ART/MUSIC Analyze Style ART/MUSIC Analyze Style CONSUMER ED Analyze Prices CONSUMER ED Analyze Prices Digital Literacy Analyze Website Digital Literacy Analyze Website

137 Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

138 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

139 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and Analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

140 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).

141 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; Analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

142 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; Analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

143 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; Analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

144 Analyze

145 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

146 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

147 Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text. Craft and Structure

148 Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, defining the question the author seeks to address. Craft and Structure

149 Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, identifying important issues that remain unresolved. Craft and Structure

150 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop andrelate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

151 Analyze

152 In the MATH Common Core State Standards the word

153 Analyze In the MATH Common Core State Standards the word Appears 28 times...

154

155 Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes. 4. Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts and other attributes

156 Operations and Algebraic Thinking 4.OA Generate and analyze patterns.

157 Operations and Algebraic Thinking 5.OA Analyze patterns and relationships.

158 Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation. Expressions and Equations 6.EE

159 Ratios and Proportional Relationships 7.0 Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

160 Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations. Expressions and Equations 8

161 Analyze functions using different representations Interpreting Functions

162 7. (+) Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts (e.g., product testing, medical testing, pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game). Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions

163 Analyze In the ELA Common Core State Standards Performance Tasks the word Appears 28 times...

164 Analyze In the ELA CCSS Performance Tasks the word

165 Analyze In the ELA CCSS Performance Tasks the word 28 Times

166 Students summarize the development of the morality of Tom Sawyer in Mark Twain’s novel of the same name and analyze its connection to themes of accountability and authenticity by noting how it is conveyed through characters, setting, and plot. [RL.8.2]

167 Students analyze how the playwright Louise Fletcher uses particular elements of drama (e.g., setting and dialogue) to create dramatic tension in her play Sorry, Wrong Number. [RL.7.3]

168 Analyze Students analyze Walt Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain!” to uncover the poem’s analogies and allusions. They analyze the impact of specific word choices by Whitman, such as rack and grim, and determine how they contribute to the overall meaning and tone of the poem. [RL.8.4]

169 Students analyze how the opening stanza of Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” structures the rhythm and meter for the poem and how the themes introduced by the speaker develop over the course of the text. [RL.6.5]

170 Students analyze how Anton Chekhov’s choice of structuring his story “Home” by beginning in “midstream” shapes the meaning of the text and contributes to its overall narrative arc. [RL.11–12.5]

171 Students provide an objective summary of Henry David Thoreau’s Walden wherein they analyze how he articulates the central ideas of living simply and being self-reliant and how those ideas interact and build on one another [RI.11–12.2]

172 The Goal

173 SCIENCE Analyze Velocity Interdisciplinary Model SS Analyze Point of View ELA Analyze Theme MATH Analyze Statistics “Analyze” HEALTH/PE Analyze Benefits HEALTH/PE Analyze Benefits ART/MUSIC Analyze Style ART/MUSIC Analyze Style CONSUMER ED Analyze Prices CONSUMER ED Analyze Prices Digital Literacy Analyze Website Digital Literacy Analyze Website

174 PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis.

175 Relevant Content with Rigorous Thinking Common Core Balances

176 Three- Phase Model

177 Talk Through Walk Through Drive Through

178 Explicit Teaching

179 Talk Through

180

181 Adult Learners Thinking Skills Analyze Teach Process as Content Part to Whole / Whole to Part Is the whole greater than the sum of the parts?

182 One meaning of “essential” involves important questions that recur throughout one’s life. A second connotation for “essential” refers to key inquiries within a discipline. What is an essential question? An essential question is – well, essential: important, vital, at the heart of the matter – the essence of the issue.

183 A question is essential when it: causes genuine and relevant inquiry provokes deep thought, lively discussion, requires students to consider alternatives, weigh evidence, stimulates vital, on-going rethinking of big ideas, sparks meaningful connections with prior learning naturally recurs, creating opportunities for transfer to other situations and subjects.

184 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process

185 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention

186

187 Look at your bill and decide what are the parts that you will need to address...

188 Counterfeit...

189 Things we might consider... Size Type of Paper Ink Designs Serial Numbers

190 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process Copy a Dollar

191 Skill Description: What Standard Requires

192

193 EABCD

194

195 Description Analyzing is... TAG

196 Think Pair Share Analyze means...

197 Examining Taking apart Appraising Noticing Details Dissecting Discerning Analyzing is...

198 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions

199 Menu of Operations “How-to” Steps for Students

200 Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis.

201 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis.

202 Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content”

203 Video: Video Content 90 seconds long Cell Phone Ad From S. Korea What things (elements) might you see that you will have to account for when analyzing this video

204 Disconnect to Connect Video

205 Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis.

206 What is the same about each scene? Characters? Setting? Action? What is the different about each scene? Characters? Setting? Action? PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis.

207 Video

208

209 What is the same about each scene? Characters? Setting? Action? What is the different about each scene? Characters? Setting? Action? PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Generate a Five word Synthesis of this video.

210 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Disconnect to Connect Video - Mind Map / Synthesis

211 Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance

212 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Share Synthesis with Partner Disconnect to Connect Video - Mind Map / Synthesis

213 Reflection: Student Comment on Process

214 Mr. Parne’s Question 1.How does this connect to something you already know? 1.How might you use it in the future?

215 Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy: “Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Mr. Parne’s Question Disconnect to Connect Video - Fishbone Share Synthesis with Partner

216 We must Coach for Transfer of Thinking Skills in CCSS

217 How to Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core 7 Key Student Proficiencies of the New National Standards

218 High Frequency Thinking Verbs

219

220

221 7 Proficiencies Critical Thinking Creative Thinking Complex Thinking Comprehensive Thinking Collaborative Thinking Communicative Thinking Cognitive Transfer

222 Critical Thinking – Analysis Evaluation Problem Solving Creative Thinking – Generate Associate Hypothesize Complex Thinking – Clarify Interpret Determine Comprehensive Thinking – Understand Infer Compare/ Collaborative Thinking – Explain Develop Decide Communicative Thinking – Reason Connect Represent Cognitive Transfer – Synthesize Generalize Apply Syllabus of Seven (with rate of frequency in CCSS)

223 Read, revisit, resolve… Three alternative solutions… Presenting Trouble Shooting with Problem Scenarios

224 Presenting #1 Time Trouble #2 Difficult Participant #3 Lost the Group #4 Equipment Failure #5 Too Much Texting #6 Pacing Problems Alternatives to Problem Based Scenarios Using the Tiny Transfer Book…write 3 alternatives

225 #1 Time- Time and Trouble You are scheduled for a 2 1/2 hour presentation/workshop from 9:00-11:30AMon Differentiated Learning. You are well-prepared and ready to go, with lots of small group work and a full agenda of strategies. The Superintendent goes well over his time with his opening remarks and does not finish until 9:30AM. Even though you have been Introduced and are beginning, people are now leaving for the restrooms. What will you do?

226 #2 -Most Difficult Participant You are being badgered by a participant who feigns alignment to your position. Yet, he is really a “blocker”, interrupting the flow of the presentation and continually making a point, raising an objection, and presenting alternative perspectives. While the ideas presented have some validity, you begin to realize that at this pace, you will not meet your goals for the planned PD. What do you do?

227 #3 - I’ve Lost the Group You know from the muffled tones, the restlessness and the glazed-over look in their eyes, that you have lost the group. They are not with you in any way, shape or form. In fact, they are noticeable unsettled and they are looking around at each other as if to say, “Should we just get up and leave?” What will you do?

228 #4 Equipment Failure- Now, What? You have a stunning Power Point presentation, with visuals, animation and sound effects. You are ready to WOW them! However, the projector provided is not compatible with your computer. You have tried everything and the time is short. There seems to be no alternative than to abandon the Power Point and move forward. What will you do?

229 #5 Client – Too Much Texting You are aware that, even though you have asked participants to “turn off their cell phones”, many of the younger staff, the Millennials, continue to do constant texting throughout the session. While they are discrete about the texting, it is obvious to others. What will you do?

230 #6 Pacing Problems You are doing a presentation of fairly new material and you do not have the depth of knowledge to elaborate and go deeper into the information. You are alarmed when you notice that you have completed most of your presentation activities and you still have an hour to go. What will you do?

231 Presenting #7 Write Your Own Problem Scenario

232 Presenting Alternatives to Problem Based Scenarios Using the Tiny Transfer Book…write 3 alternatives #1Time Trouble #2 Difficult Participant #3 Lost the Group #4 Equipment Failure #5 Too Much Texting #6 Pacing Problems #7 Your Choice

233 The success of professional development or professional learning can only be determined by measuring the implementation of strategies, the incorporation of concepts and changes in attitudes that teachers are able to transfer from the staff room to the classroom. Too many times, professional learning is judged based on evaluations filled out by teachers as they are packing up their bags and collecting their car keys. As principals and teachers shift their thinking about the goals of professional learning, they understand that success is measured by the number and level of applications in the classroom following the professional learning sessions.

234 5 Words or Less


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