Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

7.Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "7.Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data."— Presentation transcript:

1 7.Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data

2 1 Prerequisites Recommended modules to complete before viewing this module  1. Introduction to the NLTS2 Training Modules  2. NLTS2 Study Overview  3. NLTS2 Study Design and Sampling  4. NLTS2 Data Sources: Parent and Youth Surveys  6. Implications for Analysis: Data Content

3 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 2 Overview  When data were collected  Respondents  Response rates  Part 2 of the survey  Source of the data  Weighting data from Parts 1 and 2  In- and out-of-secondary school items  Employment items  Variations across waves  Closing  Important information

4 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 3 When data were collected Parent/guardian surveys  Parents or guardians were surveyed in Waves (1 to 5).  The primary source of data in each wave was a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview – a CATI interview.  In Waves 1, 4, and 5, parent/guardians who could not be reached by telephone were mailed a questionnaire that contained fewer questions with less complexity than in the CATI interview.

5 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 4 When data were collected Parent/guardian surveys (cont’d)  In Waves 3 to 5: Parent/guardian nonrespondents were given an option to complete an abbreviated interview and often did so.  If youth was not surveyed, additional questions were asked of parent. Either as a continuation of the interview if permission to interview the youth was denied or youth was not capable of responding. Or at a later date when youth could not be contacted after repeated attempts.

6 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 5 When data were collected Youth Surveys  Youth were surveyed in Wave 2 and later waves; there were no Wave 1 youth data.  Youth completed either an interview or a mail survey questionnaire. Similar questions in both formats.  In Wave 2, parent/guardian was contacted before youth and permission was asked to interview youth younger than 18.  In Waves 3 to 5, attempts to reach the youth and the parent/guardian were concurrent: In Wave 2, all youth survey data have corresponding parent/guardian data. In Waves 3 to 5, it was possible to have youth data and no parent/guardian data if the youth was 18 or older in that wave.

7 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 6 When data were collected Wave 1Wave 2Wave 3Wave 4Wave 5 Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Parent telephone interviews or surveys Youth telephone interviews or surveys Direct assessment and in-person interviews Teacher Survey Student’s School Program Survey School Characteristics Survey Transcripts

8 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 7 Respondents In Wave 1, only parent/guardians were surveyed. In Waves 2 to 5, parent/guardians and youth were surveyed in a two-part survey.  Part 1 interview respondents were parent/guardians.  Part 2 interview respondents were either youth or parent/guardians (the youth was the preferred respondent for Part 2). The parent/guardian is the Part 2 respondent if  Permission was denied to interview a youth younger than 18.  Parent/guardian indicated that youth was not capable of completing an interview or mail survey questionnaire.  Youth could not be reached to complete the survey.

9 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 8 Response rates The response rate was highest in Wave 1. Waves 3 to 5 had similar response rates but were lower than earlier waves Decreases in response rates  Some original contact data provided by LEAs were found to be incomplete or invalid and families were never contacted.  Most attrition was due to invalid or outdated contact information in spite of follow-up and sample tracking procedures.  Some respondents refused initially, some refused in later waves.  The original sample was 11,270; families were removed from the sample if we learned youth was deceased. By Wave 5, the eligible sample was 11,080.

10 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 9 Response rates Parent/Youth Surveys W1 Parent Survey82% W2 Parent/Youth Survey61% W3 Parent/Youth Survey50% W4 Parent/Youth Survey50% W5 Parent/Youth Survey48% School Surveys W1 (Teacher, Program, School)36%,53%, 57% W2 (Teacher and Program)41%, 52% Student Assessments W1 Administration63% W2 Administration72% Transcripts [multiple waves]81%

11 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 10 Part 2 of the survey In Wave 2, the youth was surveyed for Part 2 if  Parent/guardian indicated that youth was capable of answering questions  Parent/guardian permission was given to contact the youth if youth was younger than 18 In Wave 3 and later waves  Youth was contacted directly if youth was 18 or older and parent/guardian had indicated in a prior wave that the youth was capable of answering questions in a telephone interview.  Parent/guardian was contacted prior to contacting youth if capability was not confirmed in a prior wave or consent was needed for youth younger than 18. As of Wave 4, all youth were older than 18 and parental consent was no longer required.

12 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 11 Part 2 of the survey Youth interview or mail survey for Part 2  Youth was contacted for a telephone interview if parent/guardian indicated that youth was capable of answering questions on the telephone.  Youth was sent a mail questionnaire if parent/guardian indicated during the interview that youth was unable to answer questions orally but could complete a questionnaire.  In Waves 4 and 5, as a response option in the parent/guardian mail survey the parent/guardian could request that a questionnaire be mailed to the youth or that the youth be contacted for an interview.  In Wave 5, youth was given the option of doing either an interview or completing a mail survey questionnaire.

13 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 12 Part 2 of the survey After completing Part 1, parent/guardian continued directly to Part 2 if  Parent/guardian indicated that youth was unable to answer oral or written questions.  Youth was younger than 18 and parent/guardian refused permission to interview youth. Parent/guardians were interviewed for Part 2 at a later date if unable to reach youth.  Parent indicated that youth could respond, but we were unable to conduct an interview or collect a mail survey questionnaire within 8 weeks. Examples of youth nonresponse: could not contact youth by phone, youth refused to be interviewed, or youth did not return mail questionnaire.

14 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 13 Source of data Data from CATI and mail survey questionnaires  Youth interview and youth mail questionnaire data were blended into a single youth item for each Part 2 question.  Parent/guardian data were blended into a single item for corresponding questions from the CATI interview, the abbreviated interview, and the mail questionnaire.  Data from different sources are coded to conform to the CATI interview data. Any dissimilarities between items and subsequent coding decisions are documented in the data dictionaries.

15 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 14 Source of data Data for Part 2  Youth and parent/guardian items were collapsed into a combined item with priority given to youth response. Combined items used the youth value and filled in with parent/guardian value if the youth was not surveyed.  Youth, parent/guardian, and youth/parent/guardian combined items are included as separate items in the database. Data and documentation for Parts 1 and 2  Data dictionaries are in separate documents for Parts 1 and 2.  Data for both parts are in a single parent/youth survey file for each wave.

16 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 15 Weighting data from Parts 1 and 2 Parent/youth data have a main weight and a youth respondent weight  For Part 1 items, use the main weight.  For Part 2 parent/guardian or youth/parent/guardian combined items, use the main weight.  Part 2 youth only items, use the youth weight.  Example: In Wave 2 parent/youth data use n2ParentWt for all parent/guardian or youth/parent/guardian combined items n2YouthWt for youth items  Note: Replicate weights were also created for main weights and youth weights.

17 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 16 In- and out-of-secondary school items Amount of time a youth was out of secondary school can determine how questions were asked in Waves 1 to 4  Some out-of-school items include all youth who are out of secondary school for any length of time.  Some out-of school items are limited to those youth who have been out of secondary school a year or more. Out-of-secondary school for these items is defined as out-of-school and out for longer than 12 months.  Some in-school items include youth who are out of secondary school but have been in school in the past year. In-secondary-school for these items is defined as in-secondary school within the past 12 months.

18 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 17 In- and out-of-secondary school items Amount of time a youth was out of secondary school can determine how questions were asked in Waves 1 to 4 (cont’d).  Some items are time dependent (in-school in the past year or out-of school for a year or more): Employment Services  Some of out-of-school items are not time dependent: Postsecondary education Items were not split out by amount of time out of secondary school in Wave 5.  Most youth were out of secondary school a year or more by Wave 5.

19 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 18 Employment items Employment questions in Waves 1 to 4  There are separate employment items in Waves 1 to 4 for Those who are currently employed versus those who are unemployed but have been employed in the last 2 years (most recent employment). Those who have been in secondary school in the past year versus those who have been out of secondary school a year or more.  Combined items were created in Waves 1 to 4 Current/most recent job variables were combined for each school attendance status (in secondary school in the past year and out of secondary school a year or more). Current/most recent job variables were combined across both types of the school attendance status.  All separate and combined employment items are included with the database for Waves 1 to 4.  In Wave 5, employment items were not asked separately by time out of school or employment status.

20 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 19 Variations across waves Longitudinal changes with data  Youth make transition from school age into adult life.  Items are deleted in later waves when they no longer apply to youth. For example, by Wave 4 all youth are older than 18, and some items about high school experience are deleted.  Items are added or modified in later waves as youth transition to adulthood. For example, school focus shifts from secondary school to postsecondary experiences.

21 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 20 Closing Topics discussed in this module  When data were collected  Respondents  Response rates  Part 2 of the survey  Source of the data  Weighting data from Parts 1 and 2  In- and out-of-secondary school items  Employment items  Variations across waves

22 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 21 Closing Next module:  9. Weighting and Weighted Standard Errors

23 7. Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data 22 Important information  NLTS2 website contains reports, data tables, and other project- related information  Information about obtaining the NLTS2 database and documentation can be found on the NCES website  General information about restricted data licenses can be found on the NCES website  address:


Download ppt "7.Implications for Analysis: Parent/Youth Survey Data."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google