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The study of diversity has many facets. Examination of the different “cultures” each of us belongs to-

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Presentation on theme: "The study of diversity has many facets. Examination of the different “cultures” each of us belongs to-"— Presentation transcript:

1 The study of diversity has many facets

2 Examination of the different “cultures” each of us belongs to-

3 Exploration of things that influence the ways people relate to the world and one another Exploration of things that influence the ways people relate to the world and one another Gender Gender Personality Personality Disabilities Disabilities Ethnic culture Ethnic culture Race Race And others… And others…

4 Discrimination: Treating people differently based on membership in a particular group

5 As service providers, those who seek our assistance come from many different backgrounds.

6 “Cultural competence” is asked of us if we are to be effective in our roles as helpers

7 In part, this means learning about other cultures and other ways of being

8 It also means having awareness of how groups of people have been treated historically

9 Peggy McIntosh tried to make herself more aware of how her experience might be different from that of other people when she made the series of statements in her article about unpacking the knapsack of white privilege

10 This week’s discussion forum asked you to think about what McIntosh has suggested and share your thoughts-

11 Here are some additional questions for your consideration: Should a landlord be able to refuse to rent to unmarried couples on the basis of the landlord’s religious beliefs? Should a landlord be able to refuse to rent to unmarried couples on the basis of the landlord’s religious beliefs? ARTICLE: Christian Landlords and the Free Exercise Clause: An Economic and Philosophical Analysis of Discrimination ARTICLE: Christian Landlords and the Free Exercise Clause: An Economic and Philosophical Analysis of Discrimination Spring, 2008 Spring, Okla. City U.L. Rev Okla. City U.L. Rev. 115 Author Author Roy Whitehead, Jr. Walter Block Patrick C. Tinsley Roy Whitehead, Jr. Walter Block Patrick C. Tinsley Copyright (c) 2008 Oklahoma City University Oklahoma City University Law Review Copyright (c) 2008 Oklahoma City University Oklahoma City University Law Review

12 Should it be illegal to discriminate against people based on sexual orientation? Anchorage Gay Rights Measure Is Set Back by Mayor’s Veto By WILLIAM YARDLEY WILLIAM YARDLEYWILLIAM YARDLEY Published: August 17, 2009 The mayor of Anchorage on Monday vetoed a ban against discrimination based on sexual orientation, saying it was unclear that such discrimination existed. The mayor, Dan Sullivan, a Republican who took office on July 1, added that “the vast majority of those who communicated their position on the ordinance are in opposition.” The ordinance, which would have prohibited such discrimination in employment, housing, education and other areas, was approved by the Anchorage Assembly last week on a 7-to-4 vote. Eight votes are necessary to override a mayoral veto. The Assembly’s approval of the ordinance, a topic of impassioned public debate at its meetings for much of the summer, followed decades of efforts to pass similar measures. Mr. Sullivan’s father, George Sullivan, who also served as mayor, vetoed an initial proposal in Then, as now, the ordinance met with vocal opposition among Christian conservatives.

13 Does Racism still exist in Alaska? Some people would say yes. Here is one of many quotes from a 2002 report on the subject: Having been born a Native, raised in my village and having lived my life in Alaska, I can say with conviction that there has not been a worse moment in Alaska’s recent history for Alaska’s Native peoples than now. In spite of all the gains Natives have made for themselves in virtually every area of public and private endeavor, the result is a society in Alaska that only dimly comprehends their existence and seems more and more unwilling to accept, let alone celebrate, the Native place in Alaska.[1] [1] 1) Byron I. Mallot, commentary, The Anchorage Daily News, Apr. 23, 1999, reprinted in Alaska Federation of Natives and the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, Roundtable on Indigenous Self-Governance, May 10, 1999, p. 18. Racism’s Frontier: The Untold Story of Discrimination and Division in Alaska Alaska Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights April 2002

14 A more recent view: Alaska’s racism is not all in the past ALAN BORAAS September 02, 2009 at 10:45AM AKST The decision to refer the recent attack on a Native man in downtown Anchorage to the FBI for consideration as a hate crime is the right decision. Two bullies are accused of accosting him, taunting him, mocking his rural Alaska speech, kicking him and shoving him around. Their actions were unprovoked; he was simply a Native man in the wrong place at the wrong time, the victim of a random act of hate. The incident would have gone unnoticed had not the alleged perpetrators posted their crime on the Internet. Until it was pulled off YouTube, they probably gained significant status points in the sub-culture of hatred that exists in Alaska. I can see a group of neo-Nazis gathered around a computer yukking it up as they watched the Native man extend his hand for a peaceful handshake only to have it slapped away and told, “I hate you Eskimos.” Tundra Drums Newspaper A link to this article in its entirety is posted on the Moodle site for our course. A link to this article in its entirety is posted on the Moodle site for our course.

15 Why is it important to study the existence of t historical and current discrimination? As human services providers who work with people of many different backgrounds, recognizing “diversity” is not sufficient. It is essential to try to understand the lived experience of those with whom we interact, and those whom we intend to serve. Coming to terms with oppression is painful for all of us. It is also necessary, if we are to relate to one another in terms of both reality and growth towards justice.

16 Becoming a “cultural ally” Acknowledges the privilege received as a member of the culturally dominant group; Acknowledges the privilege received as a member of the culturally dominant group; Listens and believes the experiences of marginalized group members without diminsihing, dismissing, normalizing, or making their experience invisible; Listens and believes the experiences of marginalized group members without diminsihing, dismissing, normalizing, or making their experience invisible; Is willing to take risks, try new behaviors, act in spite of own fear and resistance from other agents; Is willing to take risks, try new behaviors, act in spite of own fear and resistance from other agents; Is humble, does not try to act as an expert toward the marginalized group culture; Is humble, does not try to act as an expert toward the marginalized group culture; Is willing to be confronted about own behavior and attitudes and consider change; Is willing to be confronted about own behavior and attitudes and consider change; Takes a stand against oppression even when no marginalized-group person is present; Takes a stand against oppression even when no marginalized-group person is present; Believes he or she can make a difference by acting and speaking out against social injustice; Believes he or she can make a difference by acting and speaking out against social injustice; Knows how to cultivate support from other allies; and Knows how to cultivate support from other allies; and Works to understand his or her own privilege and does not burden the marginalized group to provide continual education. Works to understand his or her own privilege and does not burden the marginalized group to provide continual education. Diller, J.V. (2007) Cultural diversity: A primer for the Human Services. 3 rd ed. Thompson Brooks/Cole:Belmont, CA. p. 57 (from the work of Wijeysinghe, Griffin and Love (1997))


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