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World History Unit 4 Connecting Hemispheres: 900 - 1800.

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Presentation on theme: "World History Unit 4 Connecting Hemispheres: 900 - 1800."— Presentation transcript:

1 World History Unit 4 Connecting Hemispheres:

2 Chapter 17 European Renaissance and Reformation, A.D. Section 1 Italy: Birthplace of the Renaissance

3 Italy and Renaissance Objectives To explain the conditions in Italy that gave rise to the Renaissance. To identify the values and ideas prized during the Renaissance. To describe the artistic breakthrough and achievements of Renaissance artists. To summarize intellectual literary works and techniques of key Renaissance writers. Vocabulary: Renaissance, humanism, secular, patron, perspective, vernacular

4 Italy’s Advantages Setting –rejection of medieval values Renaissance –rebirth of art and learning –N. Italy cities –Crusade ‘trade’ wealthy merchants –dominated politics –Medici »rulers & patrons Greco-Roman culture –monasteries –Constantinople (1453)

5 Renaissance Values & Ideas Humanism –classical Greek & Roman culture –human potential and achievements secular –worldly; enjoy life’s pleasures –no offense to God patrons –wealthy supporters of the arts –church and merchants ‘Renaissance Man’ –to excel in many fields –‘woman’ well-educated but lack power

6 Renaissance Art Artistic Styles –realistic; citizens; human body Techniques –nude sculpture –perspective illusion of 3-dimensions Leonardo da Vinci –painter, sculptor, inventor, scientist –‘Renaissance Man’ Michelangelo –Sistene Chapel Raphael –‘School of Athens’

7 School of Athens

8 Michelangelo

9 Leonardo da Vinci

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12 Renaissance Writers Vernacular –native language –Dante Alighieri ‘The Divine Comedy’ –Geoffrey Chaucer ‘The Canterbury Tales’ Petrarch –humanist writer and poet Machiavelli –‘The Prince’ –guidebook for rulers Women –personal subjects

13 Italy and Renaissance Objectives To explain the conditions in Italy that gave rise to the Renaissance. Thriving cities, wealthy merchants, Greco-Roman culture To identify the values and ideas prized during the Renaissance. Humanists, secular, patrons, ‘Renaissance Man’ To describe the artistic breakthrough and achievements of Renaissance artists. New techniques - perspective, realism, human form To summarize intellectual literary works and techniques of key Renaissance writers. Vernacular, human nature, ‘The Prince’, personal subjects

14 Assessment 1) Renaissance 2) humanism 3) secular 4) patron 5) perspective 6) vernacular 7) Renaissance Man 8) Sistene Chapel painter 9) Mona Lisa painter 10) Wrote ‘The Prince’ 1) rebirth of arts / learning 2) human potential 3) worldy; here and now 4) supporter of the arts 5) illusion of 3-dimensions 6) native language 7) excel in many fields 8) Michelangelo 9) Leonardo da Vinci 10) Machiavelli

15 Chapter 17 European Renaissance and Reformation, A.D. Section 2 The Northern Renaissance

16 Objectives To explain the origins and characteristics of the Northern Renaissance. To trace the impact of the Renaissance on German and Flemish painters. To profile key Northern Renaissance writers. To explain how printing spread Renaissance beliefs. Vocabulary: Utopia, printing press, Gutenberg Bible

17 Northern Renaissance England, France, Germany, Flanders –unification in England / France strong monarchs –northern traditions religious over secular social reform / Christian values Renaissance Art –artists flee Italian wars German –Hans Holbein the Younger religion / classical myths realism Flemish –Jan van Eyck realism / oil based paints

18 Chancellor Rolin

19 Peasant Wedding

20 Still Life

21 Northern Writers Christian Humanists –social concerns / religious slant Desiderius Erasmus –Holland (Latin) –‘The Praise of Folly’ human flaw Thomas More –England (Latin) –‘Utopia’ Greek - no place free of human folly Francois Rabelais –France (French) –‘Gargantua’ and ‘Pantagruel” –humor to make a point

22 Northern Writers William Shakespeare –English playwright (English) –ideals of the Renaissance human potential tragic human flaws –MacBeth, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, King Lear classical Greco-Roman themes Elizabethan Age – –‘Renaissance Woman’ Queen multiple languages poet

23 Spread of Renaissance Ideas Movable Type –China in 1045 Johann Gutenberg –adaptation of movable type –printing press –Gutenberg Bible 1st printed book 1455 learning –fast and cheap –spread of ideas –rise in literacy Bible –mass interpretation

24 The Northern Renaissance Objectives To explain the origins and characteristics of the Northern Renaissance. Unified nations, strong monarchs, Italian ideas combined with northern traditions To trace the impact of the Renaissance on German and Flemish painters. Italian ideas head north, focus on realism, Flanders as center To profile key Northern Renaissance writers. Christian humanists, social and religious concerns, Shakespeare, Elizabethan Age To explain how printing spread Renaissance beliefs. Bible, learning and literacy, mass interpretations

25 Assessment 1) Greek Utopia definition 2) printing press inventor 3) 1st book printed on press 4) realism 5) new type of paint 6) MacBeth author 7) movable type inventor 1) “no place” 2) Johann Gutenberg 3) Gutenberg Bible 4) lifelike 5) oil-based 6) Shakespeare 7) China

26 Chapter 17 European Renaissance and Reformation, A.D. Section 3 Luther Starts the Reformation

27 Objectives To analyze historical forces and religious issues that sparked the Reformation. To trace Martin Luther’s role in the religious movement to reform the Catholic Church. To analyze the impact of Luther’s religious revolt. To explain the spread of the Protestant faith to England during King Henry VIII’s reign. Vocabulary: indulgence, Reformation, Lutheran, Protestant, Peace of Augsburg, annul, Anglican

28 Luther Starts the Reformation Causes –Renaissance ideas secular & individual printing press –Rulers resistance to Pope corrupt practices worldly affairs –Church tax resentment –Church leaders reform calls s –John Wycliffe (England) –Jan Hus (Bohemia) 1500s (Christian humanists) –Desiderius Erasmus –Thomas More

29 Luther’s Challenge Martin Luther ( ) –German monk –indulgences pardon for past sins 95 Thesis Reformation –salvation through faith in God ‘good works’ not needed –Bible as supreme authority Pope as false authority –all could interpret the Bible priests not needed Founding of Christian churches

30 Response to Luther Pope Leo X –excommunication in 1520 Emperor Charles V –Holy Roman Emperor –Edict of Worms Luther outlaw and heretic crime to feed or shelter Lutherans –followers of Luther Peasant Revolts (1524) –religious, personal freedom Protestants –German princes not loyal to pope – war –Peace of Augsburg

31 Protestant England Henry VIII - ( ) –King of England Henry’s wives –Catherine of Aragon (1527) aunt of Charles V daughter Mary annul –set aside –Reformation Parliament (1529) Act of Supremecy (1534) –King head of church –seizes monasteries / land –Anne Boleyn (1533) daughter Elizabeth beheaded in 1536 –3rd wife son Edward

32 Henry VIII’s Children Edward VI –1st to rule; –Protestant control Mary I – –Catholic rule; Pope as head Elizabeth I – –return to Protestantism –Anglican official church Book of Common Prayer Protestant / Catholic compromise –defeat of Spanish Armada (1588)

33 Luther Starts the Reformation Objectives To analyze historical forces and religious issues that sparked the Reformation. Renaissance ideas, corrupt clergy, church leaders call for reforms To trace Martin Luther’s role in the religious movement to reform the Catholic Church. Protests indulgences, 95 Thesis, salvation and Bible interpretation To analyze the impact of Luther’s religious revolt. Pope excommunicates, HRE ‘heretic’, German peasant revolt, HRE war with Protestant princes To explain the spread of the Protestant faith to England during King Henry VIII’s reign. Henry’s ‘annulment,’ Henry head of English church, Protestant / Catholic heir clashes, Elizabeth I’s Protestantism

34 Assessment 1) indulgence 2) Reformation 3) Luther’s followers 4) German princes decide region’s own religion 5) Christians belonging to non-Catholic churches 6) annul 7) Church of England 8) He beheaded 2 wives 1) pardon from prior sin 2) religious reform 3) Lutherans 4) Peace of Augsburg 5) Protestants 6) set aside 7) Anglican Church 8) Henry VIII

35 Chapter 17 European Renaissance and Reformation, A.D. Section 4 The Reformation Continues

36 Objectives To explain John Calvin’s Protestant teachings and their spread throughout northern and western Europe. To describe the beliefs of other reformers and women’s roles in the Reformation. To trace the reforms within the Catholic Church. Vocabulary: predestination, Calvinism, theocracy, Presbyterian, Anabaptist, Catholic Reformation, Jesuits, Council of Trent

37 Calvinism John Calvin –Institutes of the Christian Religion –Calvinism sinful by nature predestination Geneva –theocracy Influences John Knox – 1559 –Presbyterians laymen –Swiss, Dutch, French –Huguenots St. Bartholomew’s Day – 1572 massacre of Protestants –C:\Documents and Settings\tfredrickson\DesktopC:\Documents and Settings\tfredrickson\Desktop

38 Reformers Protestant Core Belief –mass interpretation Anabaptists –“baptize again” adult baptism –separation of church and state opposition to war Catholic Reformation –Ignatius of Loyola –Jesuits (Society of Jesus) education missionary work stop spread of Protestantism –Council of Trent ( ) Catholic interpretation final

39 The Reformation Continues Objectives To explain John Calvin’s Protestant teachings and their spread throughout northern and western Europe. Predestination, sinful by nature, theocracy, Protestant influence To describe the beliefs of other reformers and women’s roles in the Reformation. Different beliefs, Anabaptist adult baptism, women behind the scene To trace the reforms within the Catholic Church. Jesuits, education, Council of Trent, clarification of church doctrine Vocabulary: predestination, Calvinism, theocracy, Presbyterian, Anabaptist, Catholic Reformation, Jesuits, Council of Trent

40 Assessment 1) taught that people are sinful by nature 2) God knows beforehand who will be saved 3) Religion founded by John Calvin 4) Followers of John Knox 5) Massacre of Huguenots in France in ) Baptize again as adults 7) The Catholic Church reforms itself 8) Society of Jesus members 9) Meetings where Catholics agree on church reforms 1)John Calvin 2)Predestination 3)Calvinism 4) Presbyterians 5) St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre 6)Anabaptists 7) Catholic Reformation 8) Jesuits 9) Council of Trent


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