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Shakespeare Sonnet 73 Romeo and Juliet. Outline William Shakespeare Sonnet English sonnet  sonnet 73 Italian sonnet  Ozymandias How to read sonnet Analyze.

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Presentation on theme: "Shakespeare Sonnet 73 Romeo and Juliet. Outline William Shakespeare Sonnet English sonnet  sonnet 73 Italian sonnet  Ozymandias How to read sonnet Analyze."— Presentation transcript:

1 Shakespeare Sonnet 73 Romeo and Juliet

2 Outline William Shakespeare Sonnet English sonnet  sonnet 73 Italian sonnet  Ozymandias How to read sonnet Analyze sonnet 73 Comparison  To His Coy Mistress Deeper into details

3 About William Shakespeare

4 Life  Early life  London and theatrical career  Later years

5 Works  Plays Shakespeare's plays tend to be placed into three main stylistic groups:  Early romantic comedies and histories  Middle period romantic comedies and tragedies  Later romances  Sonnets

6 Bibliography  Shakespeare‘s plays are traditionally organized into three groups: Tragedies 、 Comedies 、 and Histories. The following list separates the plays according to their classification in the First Folio , the first published edition of Shakespeare’s plays. Today , some of the comedies are usually considered as a separate subgenre , the romances or tragicomedies.

7 The Complete Works of William Shakespeare  Comedy All's Well That Ends Well As You Like It The Comedy of Errors Cymbeline Love's Labours Lost Measure for Measure The Merry Wives of Windsor The Merchant of Venice A Midsummer Night's Dream Much Ado About Nothing Pericles, Prince of Tyre Taming of the Shrew The Tempest Troilus and Cressida Twelfth Night Two Gentlemen of Verona Winter's Tale All's Well That Ends Well As You Like It The Comedy of Errors Cymbeline Love's Labours Lost Measure for Measure The Merry Wives of Windsor The Merchant of Venice A Midsummer Night's Dream Much Ado About Nothing Pericles, Prince of Tyre Taming of the Shrew The Tempest Troilus and Cressida Twelfth Night Two Gentlemen of Verona Winter's Tale  History Henry IV, part 1 Henry IV, part 2 Henry V Henry VI, part 1 Henry VI, part 2 Henry VI, part 3 Henry VIII King John Richard II Richard III Henry IV, part 1 Henry IV, part 2 Henry V Henry VI, part 1 Henry VI, part 2 Henry VI, part 3 Henry VIII King John Richard II Richard III

8  Tragedy Antony and Cleopatra Coriolanus Hamlet Julius Caesar King Lear Macbeth Othello Romeo and Juliet Timon of Athens Titus Andronicus Antony and Cleopatra Coriolanus Hamlet Julius Caesar King Lear Macbeth Othello Romeo and Juliet Timon of Athens Titus Andronicus  Poetry The Sonnets A Lover's Complaint The Rape of Lucrece Venus and Adonis Funeral Elegy by W.S.

9 Starting Questions

10 Did you read these two sonnets? Which one do you prefer? Why?

11 SONNET I. Sonnet A. Italian (Petrarchan) B. English (Shakespearean) II. Form A. Fourteen-line poem B. Iambic pentameter (10syllables/line) C. Patterned rhyme scheme

12 Italian Sonnet I. Two Sections: A. Octave (8) → a-b-b-a-a-b-b-a B. Sestet (6) → c-d-e-c-d-e,orc-d-c-c-d-c II. Different Functions: A. Octave: Subject, proposition, problem B. Sestet: Turn, resolution III. The Ninth Line: A. Clear break B. “Turn” → Volta C. Proposition→ resolution (A change: tone, mood)

13 Ozymandias I met a traveller from an antique land (a) Who said:—Two vast and trunkless legs of stone—(b) Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand, (a) Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown------(b) And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command (a) Tell that its sculptor well those passions read (c) Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things, (d) The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed.—(c) And on the pedestal these words appear: (e) "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: (d) Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!“ (e) Nothing beside remains: round the decay (f) Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, (e) The lone and level sands stretch far away (f)

14 English Sonnet Two Sections: A. Three Quatrains (4-4-4) B. Couplet (2) Rhyme scheme: a-b-a-b/ c-d-c-d/ e-f-e-f/ g-g Functions: A. Quatrains→ Ideas B. Resolution Why Shakespearean sonnet?

15 Sonnet 73 That time of year thou mayst in me behold (a) When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang (b) Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,---(a) Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.---(b) In me thou seest the twilight of such day (c) As after sunset fadeth in the west, (d) Which by and by black night doth take away,----(c) Death's second self, that seals up all in rest (d) In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire (e) That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, (f) As the death-bed whereon it must expire (e) Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by.—(f) This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,---(g) To love that well which thou must leave ere long (g)

16 How to Read Sonnet Meaning---Words & Patterns Pay attention to: 1. Line-end punctuation (Line 4,8,12) 2. Connective words--and, or, but, as, so, if, then, when, which (Line 5,9,13) 3. The ninth line & Couplet

17 Paraphrase & Sentence Structure That time of year thou mayst in me behold O.(3) S.(1) (Adv.) V.(2) You may see in me the autumn of my life, 1 2 (Adv.) 3 When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang When a few yellow leaves or none at all hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, On the branches, shaking against the cold Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. Bare ruins of church choirs where lately the sweet birds sang

18 In me thou seest the twilight of such day You see in me only dim light that remains As after sunset fadeth in the west, Like when the sunset has faded to darkness in the west Which by and by black night doth take way, Which is soon extinguished by black night Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. The image of death that envelop everything in deathly sleep

19 In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire You see in me the glowing embers That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, That lie upon the ashes remaining from the flame of my youth As the death-bed whereon it must expire The ashes are now like the death-bed where it (youth) must finally die Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. Consumed by that which once fed it.

20 This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, This you see, and it makes your love more determined To love that well which thou must leave ere long. To love that well which you must give up before long

21 What is it about? ravages of time & mature loveMain argument: ravages of time & mature love 1. Speaker’s anxieties of advanced age and his inevitable fate: old age, fading youth, death, and eternal separation from his lover 2. Ravages of time on body & mental anguish with moving further from youth to death Love 3. Love could leave when time and everything are gone →Couplet: exhortation: one’s love should grow stronger as one’s time left to love is running out

22 Background Information Written to a young friend: Mr. W.H. (whose identity remains a mystery) Sonnet as a group: on mortality

23 “To His Coy Mistress” Comparison with “To His Coy Mistress” Similarities 1. Carpe diem (seize the day) 2. Figurative language 3. Inverted sentence structure

24 Differences Sonnet73 1st person Argument: ravages of time Tone: pensive & wistful Use of metaphor ---nature symbols ---3 levels of declining life : season→day→every minute To His Coy Mistress 1st person in presenting another man Argument: persuade her to have sex with him Tone: straightforward, passionate, immature Use of metaphor: exaggerative, playful, explicit

25 Examples 1. “Two hundred to adore each breast/ thirty thousand to the rest” (line15,16) 2. Mockery of idealized romantic poetry through crude or shocking imagery: “then worms shall try / That long preserved virginity” (line27,28) Logic: If→But→So

26 Works Cited esonnets/section5.rhtmlhttp://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/shak esonnets/section5.rhtml shakespeare/section10.htmlhttp://www.gradesaver.com/classicnotes/titles/ shakespeare/section10.html rces/a/sonnet73guide_3.htmhttp://shakespeare.about.com/od/studentresou rces/a/sonnet73guide_3.htm sonnets#Mr._W.H.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare%27s_ sonnets#Mr._W.H Marvell.html#Tophttp://www.cummingsstudyguides.net/Guides4/ Marvell.html#Top

27 Sonnet 73 1 st stanza That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.

28 That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. The speaker tells that his age is like the late autumn, which is soon changed into the winter. The speaker’s age

29 3th In me thou seest the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west, Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. 2 nd STANZA

30 3th In me thou seest the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west, Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. The speaker uses “twilight” to compare his life which is no longer bright but becoming weak. 2 nd stanza The speakers’ live

31 In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, As the death-bed whereon it must expire Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. 3 3rd stanza

32 In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, As the death-bed whereon it must expire Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. The speaker’s life is like the ashes, once were wood but now is burning out; and the ashes would put out the fire of life. 3 3rd stanza

33 Last stanza This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

34 Last stanza This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long. This—the speaker won’t live forever That—the listener’s youth, or the speaker? ? ?

35 Works Cited net73guide.htmhttp://shakespeare.about.com/od/studentresources/a/son net73guide.htm online.com/sonnets/73detail.htmlhttp://www.shakespeare- online.com/sonnets/73detail.html

36 Conclusion on sonnet 73 Beautiful sonnet Pursuing immortal love 死了都要愛

37 Reflective Question 1.What would left behind after death? (as immortal?) 2. Do you agree with our interpretation that love is immortal? Why?

38 Romeo and Juliet— Impulsive Love Leads to a Tragic Fate By Carol and Zora

39 Outline Plot overview Rhyme Pursue & Response Debate Courting sonnet J’s characters Romantic love

40 Plot Overview (Act I)-- Characters Place: Verona Romeo - The son and heir of Montague and Lady Montague. Juliet - The daughter of Capulet and Lady Capulet. Paris - A kinsman of the Prince (ruler of Verona), and the suitor of Juliet most preferred by Capulet. Benvolio - Montague’s nephew, Romeo’s cousin and thoughtful friend. Rosaline - The woman with whom Romeo is infatuated at the beginning of the play.

41 Plot Overview ( Act I) The Capulet and the Montague are feuding families. Romeo confides his love toward Rosaline after some prodding by Benvolio. Paris seeks Juliet’s hand in marriage. Paris went to a feast held by Capulet; Romeo and Benvolio went to the feast as well. Romeo sees Juliet from a distance and instantly falls in love with her. Romeo speaks to Juliet and kisses her. They kiss each other without knowing each others’ names. Both Romeo and Juliet feel anguished after knowing each other’s identities.

42 RHYME R [To J]: If I profane with my unworthiest hand (1) This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: (2) My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand (3) To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. (4) J: Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much (5) Which mannerly devotion shows in this (6) For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, (7) And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss. (8)

43 R: Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? (9) J: Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. (10) R: O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; (11) They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. (12) J: Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake. (13) R: Then move not, while my prayer’s effect I take. (14) ABAB  hand, this; stand, kiss CBCB  much, this; touch, kiss DEDE  too, prayer; do, despair FF  sake, take

44 R [To J]: If I profane with my unworthiest hand (1) This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: (2) My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand (3) To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. (4) J: Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much (5) Which mannerly devotion shows in this (6) For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, (7) And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss. (8) R: Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? (9) J: Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. (10) R: O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; (11) They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. (12) J: Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake. (13) R: Then move not, while my prayer’s effect I take. (14)

45 PERSUE ( R to J ) If I profane with my unworthiest hand (1) This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: (2) My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand (3) To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. (4) If I profane this holy shrine with my unworthiest hand, I will get punish. ( fine: like to pay some fine ) I want to kiss your hands to smooth the rough touch of my hands. shrine  J ’ s hands pilgrim  R ’ s lips profanation  touching the hand, kiss  to purge the sin Kinds of sophistry

46 JULIET’S RESPONSE Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much (5) Which mannerly devotion shows in this (6) For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, (7) And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss. (8) It is not your hands should be blamed, it shows great devotion when touching me. It is okay to touch hands, why kiss? pilgrim  R saint  J ( in sonnet used to pursue, woman often=saint or goddess ) J changes the metaphor from part to the personchanges palmer = pilgrim J plays on words

47 DEBATING R: Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? (9) J: Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. (10) R: O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; (11) They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. (12) J: Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake. (13) R: Then move not, while my prayer’s effect I take. (14) R: Both saint and pilgrim have lips, why they can’t kiss? J: Lips is something use for prayers. R: Let my lips do what hands do ( palm to palm = kiss ) J: ( do not agree, but do not refuse as well )

48 CONCEIT Definition: conceit is a kind of metaphor that does not happen in just one sentence. It gets developed and its meaning extended in different lines. Stanza 1: shrine  J ’ s hands pilgrim  R ’ s lips touching  profanation Stanza 2: pilgrim  R saint  J touching  a kiss of the palmer

49 COURTING SONNET  Courting with a sonnet  The first conversation between Romeo and Juliet

50 R: Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged. J: Then have my lips the sin that they have took. R: Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged! Give me my sin again. J: You kiss by the book. R: kissing you, my sin is purged J: Because of your kiss, sin is now on my lips R: Let me take my sin back! kiss by the book  1. You make a sonnet to kiss me 2. Your kissing skill is not good enough Actually they both want to kiss each other

51 Juliet’s Characters in Scene V Active Witty Promiscuous

52 Romantic Love in R&J( Kate’s Notes) 1. Sex: to show that love is never only spiritual. 2. The youth's impulsiveness 3. Fortune: the two lovers are star- crossed because of the feud between the two families. 4. Religion: like Platonic love, it is elevated as a religious love of the saint.

53 The Shared Sonnet Between R&J Creates a formal link between their love and destiny. A means of expressing impulsive love and linking it to a tragic fate.

54 Conclusion Stereotype Author’s age: -sonnet 73: 1609 (45, 7 years before death) -R & J: mid-1590s (20~30) 愛你愛到死

55 Reflective Question

56 Do you think R’s affection on J is true, or J is only a substitute for Rosaline? Why? Please compare J & the lady in Flea.

57 It’s over. Thank You


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