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LITERARY TERMS Know them, use them, LOVE them! Hyperbole A figure of speech in which exaggeration is used for emphasis or effect, as in I could sleep.

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Presentation on theme: "LITERARY TERMS Know them, use them, LOVE them! Hyperbole A figure of speech in which exaggeration is used for emphasis or effect, as in I could sleep."— Presentation transcript:

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2 LITERARY TERMS Know them, use them, LOVE them!

3 Hyperbole A figure of speech in which exaggeration is used for emphasis or effect, as in I could sleep for a year or This book weighs a ton.

4 Introduction Author’s use colorful exaggerations to add interest to a story. “I’m so hungry I could eat a horse!” is much more interesting than “I’m hungry.”

5 Getting a shot in my arm stung. Getting a shot in my arm stung like a bee.

6 These books are heavy. These books are heavy as lead.

7 The queen’s dress is red. The queen’s dress is red as a cardinal.

8 I was angry. I was angry as an old wet hen.

9 It rained hard. It rained cats and dogs.

10 Activity: Rewrite these sentences with a more interesting hyperbole. The music was loud. The garden is pretty. The tired man snored loudly. The flowers grew quickly. I ate so much lunch my tummy is full.

11 Michelle Gaines

12 What is an idiom? words, phrases, or expressions that are not interpreted logically or literally unusual expressions that are either grammatically incorrect or have a meaning that cannot be comprehended through contextual clues

13 It ’ s Raining Cats and Dogs!!!! It ’ s raining cats and dogs means: a.Cats and dogs are falling from the sky. b.It ’ s raining very hard. c.It ’ s not raining much at all. d. The weather is horrible. a. c. d. b. HINT: I can ’ t go outside because it ’ s raining cats and dogs and I would get soaked!

14 Skeletons in Your Closet Skeletons in your closet means: a.Your closet is full of skeletons. b.You are hiding something in your closet. c.You have secrets or something that you don ’ t want anyone to know. d.You are not afraid of anything. a. b. c. d. Hint: Why shouldn ’ t you be able to answer all of my questions? Don ’ t tell me you have skeletons in your closet!

15 Shake a leg means: a.A dance move used in the Shag. b.Shake your leg to get a bug off of it. c.Hurry up! d.You are doing the Hokey Pokey. Hint: We ’ re going to be late for the plane if you don ’ t shake a leg! a.a. b. d.d. c.c.

16 To break the iceTo be the first to say or do something hoping that others will join you To have a chip on your shoulder Describes a person who is angry and defensive or who is always ready to argue or fight Hold your horsesBe patient; wait a minute Over the hillOld or too old to do something On cloud nineVery happy or excited Pulling your legTeasing you Common Idioms and their meanings:

17 IMAGERY The “word pictures” that writers create to help evoke an emotional response. –W–Writers use sensory details, or descriptions that appeal to one or more of the five senses: sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell.

18 An image is a word or phrase that appeals to one of our senses. Images can help us create a mental picture hear a sound feel texture or temperature taste a sweet, sour, or salty flavor What Is an Image?

19 And straightway like a bell Came low and clear The slow, sad murmur of the distant seas, And in the hush of waters was the sound Of pebbles rolling round, For ever rolling with a hollow sound. And bubbling sea-weeds as the waters go Swish to and fro Their long, cold tentacles of slimy grey. —from “ The Shell ” by James Stephens Listen to this excerpt of “ The Shell ” by James Stephens and imagine the scene he describes. What Is an Image?

20 Which words appeal to the sense of hearing? sight? touch? What Is an Image? And straightway like a bell Came low and clear The slow, sad murmur of the distant seas, And in the hush of waters was the sound Of pebbles rolling round, For ever rolling with a hollow sound. And bubbling sea-weeds as the waters go Swish to and fro Their long, cold tentacles of slimy grey. —from “ The Shell ” by James Stephens Quick Check [End of Section]

21 Poets and painters both create vivid images. Painters choose from a palette of colors to create different textures and moods in their works. Poets also have a palette—a palette of words—from which they choose just the right words to create a sensory experience for the reader. Imagery in Poetry

22 Poets use imagery to speak to our deepest feelings—joy, sorrow, wonder, love emphasize certain qualities of the subject create a mood Out on the land White Moon shines. Shines and glimmers against gnarled shadows, All silver to slow twisted shadows Falling across the long road that runs from the house. —from “ Baby Face ” by Carl Sandburg Imagery in Poetry

23 How does the imagery affect your emotions? Explain. What mood does the poet create through his use of imagery? Imagery in Poetry Quick Check The Loon by Lew Sarett A lonely lake, a lonely shore, A lone pine leaning on the moon; All night the water-beating wings Of a solitary loon. With mournful wail from dusk to dawn He gibbered at the taunting stars,— A hermit-soul gone raving mad, And beating at his bars. [End of Section]

24 Images can be drawn from all sorts of things we observe in life. For each category, create two images—one pleasant and one unpleasant. Try to include images that appeal to all five senses. ImagesPleasantUnpleasant Animal images Flower images Water images Sky images Earth images City images Country images Practice

25 Making Inferences

26 Inference Take what you know and make a guess! Draw personal meaning from text (words) or pictures. You use clues to come to your own conclusion. Take what you know and make a guess! Draw personal meaning from text (words) or pictures. You use clues to come to your own conclusion.

27 Make an Inference! What does this image tell me?

28 Question… What did I already know that helped me make that inference? Did I use picture or written clues? What did I already know that helped me make that inference? Did I use picture or written clues?

29 Help Me Make an Inference!

30 More Questions… Did you use words, graphs, or picture clues to help you make a guess about what that cartoon meant?

31 Try Again! Can he draw more than tigers? Look up words you don’t know! Can he draw more than tigers? Look up words you don’t know!

32 Make 1 more Inference

33 How Do Good Readers Make Inferences? They use: 1.Word/text clues 2.Picture clues 3.Define unknown words 4.Look for emotion (feelings) 5.Use what they already know 6.Look for explanations for events 7.ASK themselves questions! They use: 1.Word/text clues 2.Picture clues 3.Define unknown words 4.Look for emotion (feelings) 5.Use what they already know 6.Look for explanations for events 7.ASK themselves questions!

34 Make Another Inference Miss White has recess duty. Jacob finds a frog, picks it up, and runs over to show it to Miss White. Miss White screams, jumps, and runs as fast as she can into the school. What can you infer from this passage? What are the “clues” in this passage? Miss White has recess duty. Jacob finds a frog, picks it up, and runs over to show it to Miss White. Miss White screams, jumps, and runs as fast as she can into the school. What can you infer from this passage? What are the “clues” in this passage?

35 Irony

36 The following slides contain one of the following types of irony. As you view the slides, decide which type of irony you think is being used in the slide. kDramatic Irony: The reader or audience knows something the character does not. kVerbal Irony: The writer or speaker says one thing, but really means something completely different. The statement takes on a double meaning. kSituational Irony: What is expected to happen is the opposite of what occurs. The following slides contain one of the following types of irony. As you view the slides, decide which type of irony you think is being used in the slide. kDramatic Irony: The reader or audience knows something the character does not. kVerbal Irony: The writer or speaker says one thing, but really means something completely different. The statement takes on a double meaning. kSituational Irony: What is expected to happen is the opposite of what occurs.

37 Irony 1 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.

38 Irony 2 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.

39 Irony 3 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.

40 Irony 4 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.

41 Irony 5 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.

42 Irony 6 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.

43 Irony 7 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.

44 Irony 8 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.

45 Irony 9 kWhat type of irony? kExplain. kWhat type of irony? kExplain.


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