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AN INDUSTRY REVIEW THE OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM PLANNING A GO-TO-MARKET PLAN Utility EE Programs for Data Centers and IT MARK BRAMFITT, P.E. BRAMFITT CONSULTING.

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Presentation on theme: "AN INDUSTRY REVIEW THE OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM PLANNING A GO-TO-MARKET PLAN Utility EE Programs for Data Centers and IT MARK BRAMFITT, P.E. BRAMFITT CONSULTING."— Presentation transcript:

1 AN INDUSTRY REVIEW THE OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM PLANNING A GO-TO-MARKET PLAN Utility EE Programs for Data Centers and IT MARK BRAMFITT, P.E. BRAMFITT CONSULTING 1

2 What is this sector all about? ICT: Information and Communications Technology Distributed Information Technology (like desktops and mobile technologies) Data Centers: everything from server closets to utility-scale stand-alone facilities ICT accounts for 3.7% of global energy use. Distributed IT accounts for a lot, with 2 billion PCs expected to be in use in Data Centers account for ~1.5% of US energy use 10 Billion or more mobile devices are expected to be sold globally in the next decade, as we move from “wired” to wireless internet era 2

3 Energy Issues Abound “Over the next five years, power failures and limits on power availability will halt data center operations at more than 90% of all companies.” AFCOM Data Center Institute’s Five Bold Predictions, 2006 “By 2008, 50% of current data centers will have insufficient power and cooling capacity to meet the demands of high density equipment.” Gartner press release, 2006 “Survey of 100 data center operators: 40% reported running out of power, cooling capacity and, to a lesser extent, space without sufficient notice.” Aperture Research Institute 3

4 It Turned Out Not To Be So Dire While some portions of the sector – notably utility-scale centers – did grow significantly in past three to five years, the sector as a whole idled through the economic decline EPA study by Jonathon Koomey; , use doubled Updated this year for The New York Times: 2005/10 growth only 36% 4

5 Data Center Definitions Server closet – <200 square feet Server room – <500 square feet Localized data center – <1,000 square feet Mid-tier data center – <5,000 square feet Enterprise data center – >5,000 square feet “Utility Scale” data centers – MW 5

6 From Closets to… 6

7 “Datacenters” Come in all Shapes and Sizes 2,580,369 Source: IDC Special Study, Data Center of the Future, Michelle Bailey, et. al. Filing Information: April 2006, IDC #06C4799 7

8 Over Half of Servers Are Outside Datacenters Source: IDC Special Study, Data Center of the Future, Michelle Bailey, et. al. Filing Information: April 2006, IDC #06C4799 Servers in “Satellite Server Rooms” 57% Servers in “Corporate Datacenters” 43% 8

9 Almost All are Satellite Server Rooms “ Satellite Server Rooms” 99.3% “Corporate Datacenters” 0.7% Source: IDC Special Study, Data Center of the Future, Michelle Bailey, et. al. Filing Information: April 2006, IDC #06C4799 9

10 Opportunities… Customers are facing power capacity issues in their existing data centers as they face IT growth The cost of energy over the life of a piece of IT equipment often exceeds its purchase price Utility-scale data center deployments are hampered by availability of power capacity For SMBs and small commercial facilities, IT energy use can be a significant portion of office energy use Some utility-scale operators are competing on the basis of energy efficiency 10

11 Spotlight On Efficiency Industry taking action o IT manufacturers o Infrastructure equipment manufacturers Industry associations active Utilities, governments initiating programs 11

12 Potential Energy Savings: Data Centers 20-40% savings possible Aggressive strategies – better than 50% savings Short paybacks – one to three years common Potential to extend life, capacity of existing data center infrastructure But there is no silver-bullet technology to get there – in fact, there are thirty plus BBs! 12

13 Airflow management Free cooling – air or water Adjust environmental conditions/controls Centralized air handlers Low pressure drop systems Equipment efficiency Cooling plant optimization Close-coupled cooling Direct liquid cooling Heat recovery UPS, transformer efficiency High voltage distribution Premium efficiency motors Direct Current power Standby generation Right sizing/ redundancy Lighting – efficiency and controls On-site generation Electrical Power supply efficiency Power management Virtualization/consolid ation Load shifting Multiuser computing/thin client Storage (many strategies) ENERGY STAR ® -rated equipment IT Efficiency Measures Cooling 13

14 And Don’t Forget Desktops Great set of energy efficiency measures that are fully vetted EnergyStar ® -rated equipment Network power management software Thin client Shared PCs Refresh 14

15 Energy-Efficient IT Equipment ENERGY STAR ® products o Desktop computers, laptops, printers o Monitors o Enterprise servers o Storage (pending) o Uninterruptable power supplies (pending) 15

16 A FULLY-INTEGRATED PROGRAM, SPANNING THE GAMUT OF EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OPTIONS, CAN CERTAINLY BE DONE. THERE ARE CHALLENGES THOUGH, AND A PHASED APPROACH IS RECOMMENDED What Role for Utilities? 16

17 End-to-end Program Portfolio Key activities for a comprehensive program portfolio Customer Education and Training Marketing and Vendor Outreach Customer Outreach Technical Assistance Incentive and Rebate Program Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification 17

18 Rebates and Incentives Deemed savings (rebate) programs are few and far between, and may best be applied mid- or upstream. Deemed savings (rebate) programs  Some IT equipment classes and measures Calculated incentives for retrofit projects Retrocommissioning or tune-up service programs (for data center airflow management measures) New construction incentives 18

19 Utility Program Obstacles (No Offense…) Lack of suitable program manager/champion EM&V risk for some technologies and portfolio components Poor visibility into vendor sector Lack of utility cooperation for mid/upstream programs Availability of competent engineering support Availability of competent/experienced ESPs 19

20 What to do? A phased approach can get you in the market fairly quickly Phase One (Year 1)  Offer deemed rebates for selected measures (desktop and virtualization)  Offer customer training sessions (invite vendors and your account reps!)  Do vendor outreach – speak at their events  Identify qualified technical support contractors  Consider issuing RFP for ESP services for Phase Two  Consult with your EM&V group early and often 20

21 Next… Move to a robust portfolio deployment Phase Two (Year Two)  Offer incentives for retrofit projects – consider limiting measures  Offer airflow management retrocommissioning program, either through ESPs or qualified vendors  If your market needs it, offer a new construction incentive program  Ramp up your internal staff – this portfolio requires close program management 21

22 MARK BRAMFITT, P.E GOUGH STREET, #100 SAN FRANCISCO, CA PHONE Interchange information technology  utilities  data centers  energy efficiency  demand response  smart grid  program design  training  strategic engagement  impact 22

23 And Now… Let’s hear from a program manager and ESP who has shown the capability of running programs for the data center and information technology sector… 23


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