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Unit 2: Boom to Bust Learning Targets 1 - 10.

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1 Unit 2: Boom to Bust Learning Targets

2 1. I can identify key women in the Women’s Movement.
Alice Paul Women’s suffragist

3 1. I can identify key women in the Women’s Movement.
Alice Paul National Woman’s Party adopted more militant strategy mass pickets, parades, hunger strikes win support of Congress/the President for amendment to US Constitution picketed the White House example of nonviolent civil disobedience charged with “obstruction of traffic” led a hunger strike while imprisoned force fed efforts led to passage of Nineteenth Amendment guaranteeing the right to vote (suffrage) for women

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5 1. I can identify key women in the Women’s Movement.
Margaret Sanger American birth control activist, sex educator, & nurse she popularized the term birth control opened the first birth control clinic in the United States established “Planned Parenthood” efforts contributed to: Griswold v. Connecticut (1965) a landmark case in which the SCOTUS ruled that the Constitution protected a right to privacy case involved a Connecticut law that prohibited the use of contraceptives by a vote of 7–2, the Supreme Court invalidated the law on the grounds that it violated the "right to marital privacy"

6 1. I can identify key women in the Women’s Movement.
Emma Goldman health and well being of humans in general 30,000,000 underfed 300,000 babies “sacrificed” in US per year women having a voice in decisions regarding their lives how many children? for what purpose? under what conditions? social war oppressed/disinherited vs. capitalism/the state

7 1. I can identify key women in the Women’s Movement.
Carrie Nation radical member of the temperance movement anti-alcohol promoted her viewpoint through vandalism attacked the property of alcohol-serving establishments (taverns) with a hatchet led to passage of 18th Amendment prohibition

8 2. I can discuss achievements that resulted from the Women’s Movement.
Prohibition Women’s Christian Temperance Union Francis Willard Carrie Nation 18th Amendment banned the manufacture, transport, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages repealed by 21st Amendment – 1933 19th Amendment – 1920 “The right of the citizens to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.”

9 2. I can discuss achievements that resulted from the Women’s Movement.
Birth control Margaret Sanger campaigned for birth control rights in the 1910’s wrote about sex education and women's health indicted for violating the Comstock Law since 1873 had banned birth control devices and information on birth control devices, sexually transmitted diseases, human sexuality, and abortion opened the first birth control clinic in the United States in 1916 activities had made birth control a matter of public debate

10 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
Nadir period of “worst race relations” in US History /2000’s a “reaction” against progress in race relations during Reconstruction if blacks are capable (or better than whites)… … then, ideas of racial superiority are wrong! generates fear among whites … … manifested in violence (the Nadir)!

11 “The Great Migration” “The Great Retreat”
3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s. “The Great Migration” “The Great Retreat” blacks migrate north b/c of: jobs in Northern cities WWI & WWII destruction of cotton crop boll weevil Nadir to escape racial hatred, violence, & threat of violence from KKK

12 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
Sundown Towns all-white towns where blacks were not allowed to live could work there but … … be out of town by sundown! violence/threat of violence to enforce (KKK) migration to northern cities in large enough numbers… … to provide safety growth of “suburbia” in 1950’s leads to … …“white flight” to suburbs and restricted covenants!

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18 How do you interpret the expressions of onlookers?
The lynching of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith, a large gathering of lynchers. August 7, 1930, Marion, Indiana. 1,000’s of copies sold for 50 cents a piece. How do you interpret the expressions of onlookers?

19 "Well John - This is a token of a great day we had in Dallas, March 3, a negro was hung for an assault on a three year old girl. I saw this on my noon hour. I was very much in the bunch. You can see the negro hanging on a telephone pole. "

20 Charred corpse of Jesse Washington suspended from utility pole
Charred corpse of Jesse Washington suspended from utility pole. May 16, 1916, Robinson, Texas. The boy was beaten and dragged to the suspension bridge spanning the Brazos River. Thousands roared, "Burn him!" Bonfire preparations were already under way in the public square, where Washington was beaten with shovels and bricks. Fifteen thousand men, women, and children packed the square. They climbed up poles and onto the tops of cars, hung from windows, and sat on each other's shoulders. Children were lifted by their parents into the air. Washington was castrated, and his ears were cut off. A tree supported the iron chain that lifted him above the fire of boxes and sticks. Wailing, the boy attempted to climb the skillet-hot chain. For this the men cut off his fingers. The executioners repeatedly lowered the boy into the flames and hoisted him out again. With each repetition, a mighty shout was raised.

21 The lynching of Leo Frank. August 17, 1915, Marietta, Georgia.
Postcards of the lynched Leo Frank were sold outside the undertaking establishment where his corpse was taken, at retail stores, and by mail order for years. The owner of the property where the lynching occurred refused repeated offers to buy the tree from which Leo Frank was hung. The dean of the Atlanta Theological Seminary praised the murderers as "a sifted band of men, sober, intelligent, of established good name and character - good American citizens." The mob included two former Superior Court justices, one ex-sheriff, and at least one clergyman.

22 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
The lynching of Laura Nelson and her son, several dozen onlookers. May 25, 1911, Okemah, Oklahoma.

23 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
Lynching scene. Commercial Avenue jammed with spectators below the electrically lit Hustler's Arch. November 11, 1909, Cairo, Illinois.

24 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
The lynching of Lige Daniels. Onlookers, including young boys. August 3, 1920, Center, Texas.

25 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
The lynching of Rubin Stacy. Onlookers, including four young girls. July 19, 1935, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

26 "I bought this in Hopkinsville 15¢ each. They are not on sale openly
"I bought this in Hopkinsville 15¢ each. They are not on sale openly. I forgot to send it until just now I ran across it. I read an account of the night riders affairs where it says these men were hung without any apparent cause or reason whatever. A law was passed forbidding these to be sent thru the mail or to be sold anymore." Lynching's reported in the northern and foreign presses were damaging to southern political and economic interests. The author of the above message documented one of the earliest efforts by local or state governments to contain the damage done to its public image by outlawing the sale and distribution of lynching images. This inscription is dated only a few months after the May 27, 1908, amendment to U. S. Postal laws and Regulations forbidding the mailing of "matter of a character tending to incite arson, murder or assassination."

27 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
Southern trees bear a strange fruit, Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, Black bodies swinging in the Southern breeze, Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees Pastoral scene of the gallant south the bulging eyes and the twisted mouth scent of magnolia sweet and fresh then the sudden smell of burning flesh Here is a fruit for the crows to pluck for the rain to gather for the wind to suck for the sun to rot for the tree to drop Here is a strange and bitter crop "Strange Fruit" Among artistic works that grappled with lynching was the song “Strange Fruit“ written as a poem by Abel Meeropol in 1939 recorded by Billie Holiday

28 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
evidence of entrenched racism in society nationwide, not just in the South reflects retaliation for abolishing slavery reinforces the idea of racial superiority exhibits extreme ethnocentrism proving how much better whites were than blacks provided a warning to others to “keep their place” reveals undemocratic nature of society as those in power exert their will against perceived lesser groups reveals common hatred based on ignorance and fear

29 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
demonstrates hate-saturated mob mentality of vigilante justice anger, fear, ignorance being manifested provided a cruel form of entertainment witnessing others perceived as inferior suffer seemed “pleasantly overcome” with common occurrence desire to “hold on” to their values and pass them on to their children reflects threat to whites of newly acquired rights for blacks

30 3. I can analyze the change in race relations from the end of Reconstruction through the 1920’s.
demonstrates how government lost control of their people out of touch with their main duty protecting the rights of all people utilized lynching’s to “scare” blacks into submissiveness blacks possessed monetary value as slaves but once freed, viewed as worthless and their lives held no value to angry whites demonstrates intolerance of differences reveals “nativist” nature of society as immigrants and Jews also victimized sympathetic whites seen as “traitors” also

31 4. I can describe the Harlem Renaissance.
A literary and artistic flowering of African-American culture emanating from the Harlem section of New York City by 1930, 20% of African American’s live in north 200,000 in Harlem section of New York famous for talented actors, artists, musicians

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34 Chain Gang She-Ba

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36 God’s Trombones Dance

37 Idylls

38 Song Towers Tombstones Female

39 4. I can describe the Harlem Renaissance.
Countee Cullen Poet “Incident” “Once riding in old Baltimore Heart-filled, head-filled with glee, I saw a Baltimorean Keep looking straight at me Now I was eight and very small And he was no whit bigger, And so I smiled, but he poked out His tongue and called me, “Nigger.” I saw the whole of Baltimore From May until December; Of all the things that happened there That’s all that I remember.”

40 4. I can describe the Harlem Renaissance.
Countee Cullen Poet “For A Lady I Know” “She even thinks that up in heaven Her class lies late and snores While poor black cherubs rise at seven To do celestial chores.”

41 4. I can describe the Harlem Renaissance.
Langston Hughes an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist “I, Too, Sing America. I am the darker brother. They send me to eat in the kitchen When company comes, But I laugh, and eat well, And grow strong. Tomorrow, I’ll be at the table When company comes. Nobody’ll dare say to me, “Eat in the kitchen,” then. Besides, they’ll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed- I, too, am America.”

42 4. I can describe the Harlem Renaissance.
Langston Hughes “Cross” My old man’s a white man And my old mother’s black. If ever I cursed my old white man I take my curses back. If ever I cursed my old black mother And wished she were in hell, I’m sorry for that evil wish And now I wish her well. My old man died in a fine big house. My ma died in a shack. I wonder where I’m gonna die, Being neither white nor black?

43 4. I can describe the Harlem Renaissance.
Claude McKay If We Must Die If we must die, let it not be like hogs Hunted and penned in an inglorious spot, While round us bark the mad and hungry dogs, Making their mock at our accursed lot. If we must die, O let us nobly die, So that our precious blood may not be shed In vain; then even the monsters we defy Shall be constrained to honor us though dead O kinsman! We must meet the common foe! Though far outnumbered let us show us brave, And for their thousand blows deal one death blow! What though before us lies the open grave? Like men we’ll face the murderous, cowardly pack, Pressed to the wall, dying, but fighting back!

44 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
A New Culture 1920 census: more people in cities than rural areas city life: popular tastes, morals, mass consumption, at odds with … strict moral/religious codes of rural America

45 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Gender Roles, Family, and Education “flapper” were a "new breed" of young women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norm

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47 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Religion Modernism influenced by: changing role of women, Social Gospel, scientific mgmt emphasized historic/critical view of religion, bible accepted Darwin’s theories w/o abandoning faith Fundamentalism Protestant preachers in rural areas condemned modernists bible must be taken literally creation as explained in Genesis blamed liberal views of modernists as causing decline in morals!

48 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Scopes Monkey Trial – 1925 The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes John Scopes accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act made it unlawful to teach evolution in any state-funded school prosecuted by Tom Stewart William Jennings Bryan called as bible expert defended by Clarence Darrow found guilty fined $100 overturned on a technicality Butler Act remained until May 18, 1967, when it was repealed by the Tennessee legislature

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Clarence Darrow John T. Scopes

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51 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Popular heroes boxing – Jack Dempsey, Gene Tunney The “long count fight” 1927 150,000 spectators in Soldier Field 50 million radio listeners

52 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Popular heroes swimming - Gertrude Ederle swam English Channel "People said women couldn't swim the Channel, but I proved they could."

53 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Popular heroes football Jim Thorpe an American athlete of mixed ancestry Native American and Caucasian very versatile won Olympic gold medals for the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon played American football also played professional baseball and basketball

54 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Popular heroes football Knute Rockne led his "Fighting Irish" to 105 victories, 12 losses, five ties three national championships five undefeated seasons without a tie

55 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Popular heroes baseball Babe Ruth one of the baseball’s most prolific hitters set career records for home runs (714 since broken first player to hit 60 home runs in one season

56 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Popular heroes golf Bobby Jones an American amateur golfer lawyer by profession won the "Grand Slam“ most successful amateur golfer retired at age 28 "It (championship golf) is something like a cage. First you are expected to get into it and then you are expected to stay there. But of course, nobody can stay there."

57 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Popular heroes flying Charles Lindbergh solo flight across Atlantic Ocean, Spirit of St. Louis 3,600 miles, 1927

58 5. I can describe the lifestyle of the 1920’s.
Prohibition Eighteenth Amendment inspired by wartime saving of grain/sober work force prohibits sale, manufacture, transportation of alcoholic beverages Volstead Act law enforcing prohibition defying the law fashionable in cities speakeasies, bootleggers, smuggled from Canada organized crime Al Capone millions in profits lead to prostitution, gambling, narcotics

59 6. I can analyze the causes of the Great Depression.
Causes of the Crash/Great Depression uneven distribution of income wages not keep pace w/ increased productivity/corp. profits top 5% receive 33% of income poorest 40% receive 10% of income top 1% income rose 75% American’s as a whole rose 9% most American’s not participate fully in economic advances of 1920’s many have not enough money to buy consumer items stock market speculation “get rich quick” fever pervades “buying on margin” borrow most of price of stock down payment as low as 10%

60 6. I can analyze the causes of the Great Depression.
Causes of the Crash/Depression excessive use of credit belief that boom was permanent installment buying “a dollar down and a dollar forever” modern advertising stimulated desire for: appliances cars overproduction of consumer goods increased productivity/use of credit spur volume of goods stagnant wages not allow purchase weak farm economy prosperity never reach farmers suffer from overproduction, high debt, low prices severe weather, long drought, etc… add to difficulties Dust Bowl

61 6. I can analyze the causes of the Great Depression.
Causes of the Crash/Depression government policies government faith in business no control/regulation laissez faire high tariffs protect industries hurt farmers, international trade global economic problems interdependence of nations due to industrial revolution, manufacturing, trade U.S. insists on loan repayment raises tariffs! Dawes Plan loans (inspired by greed) suspended after stock market collapse!!

62 10. I can explain the purpose of the New Deal.
Franklin D. Roosevelt program to alleviate problems of the Great Depression 3 R’s relief for the needy economic recovery financial reform

63 10. I can explain the purpose of the New Deal.
relief for the needy soup kitchens bread lines

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65 10. I can explain the purpose of the New Deal.
economic recovery public works projects Civilian Conservation Corps trees, lakes, parks, … Public Works Administration roads, bridges, courthouses Works Progress Administration hospitals, libraries, schools, make-work projects?

66 10. I can explain the purpose of the New Deal.
financial reform Glass-Steagall Act prohibited banks from “speculative” lending practices created Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insures bank deposits $5,000 then; $250,000 today Securities and Exchange Commission regulated stock market banned “buying on margin” & “insider trading” speculation

67 10. I can explain the ways in which the New Deal impacted society.
Expanded power of federal government infusion of millions of dollars into the economy creation of federal jobs increasing supply and demand participating in solving labor disputes Deficit spending spending more money than the government receives in revenue public works projects roads, bridges, schools, hospitals, courthouses, etc … defense spending Cold War, Korean Conflict, Vietnam, Persian Gulf, etc…

68 10. I can explain the ways in which the New Deal impacted society.
Social Security old-age insurance retirees age 65 or older and their spouses supplemental to private retirement plan funded through employer and employee contributions excluded: domestic servants, farm workers, hospital & restaurant workers, teachers (today) unemployment compensation funded through a tax on employers administered through the states aid to families with dependent children and the disabled aid to the blind, crippled, needy elderly, dependent mothers and children


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