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BIBLE ILLITERACY Presented by Todd B. Freese.

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1 BIBLE ILLITERACY Presented by Todd B. Freese

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4 Where is True North Okay everybody from where you are sitting, close your eyes and point to the direction you think is North, no peeking.

5 A BIBLE QUIZ 1.How many books are in the Old Testament? 2.What are the first five books of the Old Testament called? 3.What was the name of the mountain that Moses went to receive the law? 4.Name the first four books of the New Testament. 5.Name the First five books of the Old Testament 6.Who was the author of Proverbs? 7.Which book of the Bible is a story of two lovers and might make some of us blush? 8.What is the last book of the Old Testament? 9.Who wrote the book of Revelation? 10.Who wrote the majority of the New Testament?

6 Answers The Torah, the Pentateuch or the law 3.Sinai 4.Matthew, Mark, Luke and John 5.Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy 6.King Solomon 7.Song of Songs 8.Malachi 9.John 10. Paul

7 THE BIBLE IS THE CORE TO OUR SOCIETY 2 Timothy 3:16 All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: King James All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness NIV All Scripture is inspired by God and is useful to teach us what is true and to make us realize what is wrong in our lives. It corrects us when we are wrong and teaches us to do what is right. NLT

8 “It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible.” So great is my veneration of the Bible... I have for many years made it a practice to read through the Bible once every year. — Andrew Jackson, the seventh United States president (1829–1837), said, “Go to the Scriptures... the joyful promises it contains will be a balsam to all your troubles. That book... is the rock on which our republic rests.”6 Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

9 “The Bible was the foundation and blueprint for our Constitution, Declaration of Independence, educational system, and our entire history until the last [twenty] to [thirty] years.” If Americans do not understand the Bible, if they are Bible illiterate, then how can they understand the history and foundation of America? Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

10 In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength. —ROBERT E. LEE Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

11 92 percent of Americans say reading the Bible has a great deal or somewhat helped them feel at peace. —The Gallup Poll, December 1998 Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

12 96 percent of American households own or have a Bible. —Yankelovich Monitor, 2005 Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

13 According to a 2000 Gallup poll, about six in ten Americans (59 per­cent) say they read the Bible at least on occasion, with the most likely readers being women, nonwhites, older people, Republicans, and political conservatives. Readership of the Bible has declined from the 1980s overall, from 73 percent to 59 percent today. And the percentage of frequent readers, that is, those who read the Bible at least once a week, has decreased slightly over the last decade, from 40 percent in 1990 to 37 percent today. In terms of frequency of readership: 16 percent of Americans say they read the Bible every day, 21 percent say they it weekly, 12 percent say they read the Bible monthly, 10 percent say less than monthly, and 41 percent say that they rarely or never read the Bible. You can just feel the cold air of Bible illiteracy’s brisk winter settling in on America. Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

14 According to both The Gallup Organization and The Barna Group, older people are more likely to read the Bible than are younger people. Gallup reports that 50 percent of those over the age of sixty-five read the Bible at least weekly, compared to 27 percent of people between the ages of eighteen and twenty-nine. 36 percent of people in their thirties and forties read the Bible that frequently. Similarly, Barna statistics show that only 30 percent of twenty-some­things have read the Bible in the past week, compared to 37 percent of thirty-somethings, 44 percent of forty-somethings, 47 percent of fifty- somethings, and 55 percent of those aged sixty and above. Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

15 TOP TEN REASONS WE DON’T READ OUR BIBLES – DO THESE SOUND FAMILIAR? 10: I Don’t Know Where to Start 9: I Can’t Find What I Want in the Bible 8: The Bible Doesn’t Confirm What I Believe 7: I Hear the Bible at Church, So Why Do I Need to Read It for Myself 6: The Language of the Bible Doesn’t Make Sense to Me 5: The Bible Is Such a Big Book. I Could Never Read It All 4: The Bible Isn’t Relevant to My Life 3: The Bible Is Boring and Wasn’t Written to Me Anyway 2: Reading the Bible Isn’t a Priority in My Life 1: I Don’t Have Time to Read the Bible

16 50 percent of born-again Christians believe that a person can earn salvation based upon good works. —The Barna Update, October 8, 2002 Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

17 America’s evangelical Christians are rightly concerned about the secular worldview’s rejection of biblical Christianity, we ought to give some urgent attention to a problem much closer to home—biblical illiteracy in the church. This scandalous problem is our own, and it’s up to us to fix it. —R. ALBERT MOHLER JR. (Note: Quick See Ephesians 2:8-9) Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

18 Teen Church Attendance First the good news: teenagers have healthier church attendance than do their parents. More than seven out of ten teens are engaged in some church-related activity in a typical week. The bad news is that when The Barna Group asked teens to estimate how likely they were to continue their church activity once they left home and were on their own, the numbers drop like a rock. This, of course, is not good news for the church and one of the reasons whey we must get serious about instilling a love for God and his Word in our young people. If they are the future of the church, what is the church’s future? Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

19 Twenty-Something Church Attendance A second surprise is with the next older demographic group— the twenty-somethings. From age twenty to twenty-nine, people make many of the decisions that shape their lives forever. For many allegiance to Christian churches is a casualty of their efforts to “create their own version of fulfillment.” The research shows that Americans aged twenty to twenty-nine are significantly less likely than any other age group to attend church, to donate to churches, or to read their Bible. Only three out of ten twenty-somethings (31 percent) attend church in a typical week, compared to four out of ten of those in their thirties (42 percent) and nearly half of all adults age forty and older (49 percent). That’s not good news for the church. Only 30 percent of twenty-somethings have read the Bible in the last week. The Barna Update, September 24, 2003

20 Senior Adult Church Attendance The third big surprise: older Americans are dropping out of church and organized faith activities in record numbers. Barna believes this is the result of two converging trends: the limited mobility and declining health of the spiritually devout Seniors generation and the of commitment among the less faith-driven Builders generation. Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

21 CHURCH ATTENDANCE In percent of Americans attend a church service on a given weekend In the early 1990’s the number was almost 50 percent The Barna Group, March 5, 2001

22 If you are a Christian, you should have the Bible “running out of your ears.” Most people only read a certain number of verses for some devotional thoughts, not to know what the book is actually saying. —J. I. PACKER Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

23 91 percent of Americans say reading the Bible has a great deal or somewhat “helped me find meaning in life.” —The Gallup Poll, December 1998 Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

24 We now live in a “post-Christian” America. The Bible has ceased to be a common base of moral authority for judging whether something is right or wrong, good or bad, acceptable or unacceptable. —ALAN CRIPPEN Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

25 83 percent of teenagers said moral truth depends on the circumstances; only 6 percent said moral truth is absolute. The Barna Update, February 12, 2002

26 When the Bible Was Discovered in a Library Martin Luther, the son of a Saxon miner, was born at Eisleben, Germany, on November 10, He entered the University of when he was seventeen. After graduation he began to study law. However, while he was walking outdoors in the summer of 1505, a lightning bolt struck near him as he was returning to school. Terrified, he cried out, “Help! Saint Anna, I’ll become a monk!” True to his word, Luther left law school and entered the Augustinian cloister in Erfurt on July 17, It was here that Luther happened on a Bible one day in the monastery library. His previous studies had left him quite unfamiliar with the Bible, so Luther began to read. He was taken prisoner by the Word of God; he couldn’t get enough of it and read it enthusiastically. Luther encountered the living God in his Word and this not only changed the monk’s life, but it also changed the landscape of Christendom. Surveys indicate that American Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Locations ). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

27 Illiteracy Leaves Life’s Key Questions Unanswered 1: How Can I Know the Truth? 2: Does God Really Exist? 3: Why Is There Evil? 4: Do All Religions Lead to God? 5: Why Am I Here? 6: Can God Ever Forgive Me? 7: What Happens After I Die? Kroll, Woodrow ( ). Taking Back the Good Book: How American Forgot the BIble and Why It Matters to You (Kindle Location 1495). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.

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