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 Bereavement › The state of having experienced a loss  Grief › is the generally passive and involuntary reaction to the state of bereavement  Mourning.

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Presentation on theme: " Bereavement › The state of having experienced a loss  Grief › is the generally passive and involuntary reaction to the state of bereavement  Mourning."— Presentation transcript:

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2  Bereavement › The state of having experienced a loss  Grief › is the generally passive and involuntary reaction to the state of bereavement  Mourning › The active process of coping with bereavement and grief  Thanatology › Study of Death and Dying

3  Kubler-Ross › Five-stage theory of the dying process (1969)  Denial  Anger  Bargaining  Depression  Acceptance

4  Kubler-Ross › Five-stage theory of the dying process (1969)  Developed for people who are dying  The theory also suggests that other individuals that are drawn into a dying person’s experiences (family and friends) may also experience similar “stages of adjustment”

5  More current experts believe that the grief process requires the individual to move between different phases or tasks  Some include:  Shock  Anger  Guilt  Fear  Depression  Reconstruction  Hope

6  Denial  Anger  Bargaining  Depression  Acceptance

7  Arthur Chickering › 7 vectors of Psychosocial Student Development  Developing competence  Managing emotions  Moving through autonomy towards interdependence  Developing mature interpersonal relationships  Establishing identity  Developing integrity  Developing purpose

8  Decrease of academic performance due to lack of study skills and ability to handle additional stresses  Students lacking in interpersonal competence may not be able to voice their needs to others or lack a support network to help them through the rough times  Students still learning how to manage their emotions may act out in ways they are not ready for. Common emotional reactions could come in the form of depressions, anger, loneliness, guilt and fear.  Students who have not achieved emotional interdependence may feel the loss of someone who they depended on for reassurance and emotional dependence  Students who have not developed mature interpersonal relationships and are bereaved may cling to relationships or withdraw from them  Students may have difficulty establishing their identity as a death loss may disrupt one’s sense of self and one’s place in the world  Students who are still developing their purpose may have difficulties after a major death loss. Students who do not have a direction may face greater grief. Students may also have trouble accommodating new family commitments  Students can develop integrity as they seek out religious or philosophical beliefs to cope with a death loss as they try to make sense of their experiences

9  A small study of 994 students  30 percent of students surveyed said that a family member died within the past 12 months  27 percent of students surveyed said that a close friend had died within the past 12 months

10  Approximately 25 of students have lost a loved one within the past 12 months  Only 4 percent of students at the counseling centers are diagnosed with “grief”

11  Physical Affects › Insomnia  Students in the first or second year of bereavement tend to suffer from lack of sleep  Lack of sleep leads to higher scores for complicated grief  Low energy leads to trouble dealing with normal physical activities such as climbing stairs

12  Behavioral Affects › Loss of patterns of conduct › Students will have trouble with:  Staying organized  Managing their time  Meeting deadlines

13  Cognitive Affects › Problems concentrating, studying, remembering › Grades drop in the first semester of bereavement

14  Emotional/Spiritual › Repressed emotions that weren’t dealt with may come up and become disruptive to the student’s life › Students suffering from bereavement will be looking for the answer to “why”

15  Counseling › Every major college campus  APU – www.apu.edu/counselingcenterwww.apu.edu/counselingcenter › Therapists – Group/Individual › Spiritual Leaders › Support Networks

16  Web Resources › Office of Mental Health – New York  http://www.omh.state.ny.us/omhweb/grief/ http://www.omh.state.ny.us/omhweb/grief/ › Helpguide.org  http://www.helpguide.org/mental/grief_loss.htm http://www.helpguide.org/mental/grief_loss.htm › University of Chicago – Virtual Pamphlets  http://counseling.uchicago.edu/vpc/virtulets.html http://counseling.uchicago.edu/vpc/virtulets.html › National Students of Ailing Mothers and Fathers Support Network  www.studentsofamf.org www.studentsofamf.org  http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/18424808 #24213663 http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/18424808 #24213663 › Grief Share – Online support network  http://www.griefshare.org/ http://www.griefshare.org/

17  Campus Level: › Create a network of interventions targeted at bereaved students. › Help create a support network that is counselor- led › Help create a support net work that is peer-led › Have faculty members serve as mentors for grieving students › Hold workshops › Market the prevalence of grief to the campus to help students feel less alone and normalize the grief

18  Servaty-Seib, H.L. (2004).Connections between counseling theories and current theories of grief mourning. Journal of Mental Health Counseling. 26, 125-145  Balk, D.E. (2008).Grieving: 22 to 30 percent of all college students. New Directions For Student Services. 121, 5-14.  Taub, D.J. and Servaty-Seib, H.L. (2008). Developmental and contextual perspectives on bereaved college students. New Directions For Student Services. 121, 15-26  Niemeyer, R.A., Laurie, A., Mehta, T., Hardison, H, & Currier, J.M. (2008). Lessons of loss: Meaning-making in bereaved college students. New Directions For Student Services. 121, 27-39.  Vickio, C.J. (2008) Designing and conducting grief workshops for college students. New Directions For Student Services. 121, 27-39.  Taub, D.J. and Servaty-Seib, H.L. (2008) Training faculty members and resident advisors to respond to bereaved students. New Directions For Student Services. 121, 51-62  Levine H. (2008) Suicide and its impact on campus. New Directions for Student Services. 121, 63-76  Hamilton, L.A. (2008) Guidelines for death notification in college student populations. New Directions for Student Services. 121, 77-86  Callahan, C.M., Fox, E.K. (2008) Student death protocols: A practitioner’s perspective. New Directions for Student Services. 121, 87-95  Fajgenbaum, D. (2007) College student Bereavement: University responses, programs, and policies, and recommendations for improvement. Georgetown University: Research conducted in fulfillment of Human Science Honors Thesis.


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