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Managing Stress 8E Principles and Strategies for Health and Well-Being Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. Unless otherwise noted, all images were supplied by Brian.

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Presentation on theme: "Managing Stress 8E Principles and Strategies for Health and Well-Being Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. Unless otherwise noted, all images were supplied by Brian."— Presentation transcript:

1 Managing Stress 8E Principles and Strategies for Health and Well-Being Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. Unless otherwise noted, all images were supplied by Brian Luke Seaward. Credit: © Inspiration Unlimited. Used with permission.

2 Chapter 7 Stress Prone & Resistant Personalities

3 “Happiness is a decision... Optimism is a cure for many things.” — Michael J. Fox Photo © Jim Ruymen/UPI/Landov

4 Ms. Nien Cheng, Author, Life and Death in Shanghai

5 Are some people prone to stress while others are not? How does personality influence our interpretations of our life events? The following are examples of stress-prone and stress-resistant personalities.

6 Are some people prone for stress while others are not? How does personality influence our interpretations of our life events? The following are examples of stress-prone and stress-resistant personalities. While there are those who say you cannot change your personality, it is agreed that you can change personality traits to become more stress-resistant.

7 Type A Behavior

8 Type A Behavior What was once called the “hurry sickness” is now regarded as an aggressive-based personality

9 Type A Characteristics

10 1. Time Urgency

11 Type A Characteristics 1. Time Urgency 2. Polyphasia (Multi-tasking)

12 Type A Characteristics 1. Time Urgency 2. Polyphasia (multi-tasking) 3. Ultra-competitiveness

13 Type A Characteristics 1. Time Urgency 2. Polyphasia (multi-tasking) 3. Ultra-competitiveness 4. Rapid Speech Patterns

14 Type A Characteristics 1. Time Urgency 2. Polyphasia (multi-tasking) 3. Ultra-competitiveness 4. Rapid Speech Patterns 5. Manipulative Control

15 Type A Characteristics 1. Time Urgency 2. Polyphasia (multi-tasking) 3. Ultra-competitiveness 4. Rapid Speech Patterns 5. Manipulative Control 6. Hyperaggressiveness, Free-Floating Hostility

16 Hostility: The Lethal Trait of Type As

17 Social Influences on Type A Behavior 1. Interest in material wealth 2. The desire for immediate gratification 3. Competitiveness 4. People as numbers or objects to overcome

18 Social Influences on Type A Behavior 5. Secularization 6. Atrophy of the body and right brain 7. Television watching & technology

19 Did Someone Say Type D Personality?

20 Did Someone Say Type D Personality? Depression

21 Codependent Personality Traits

22 Codependency Behavior Traits

23 1. Ardent approval seekers 2. Perfectionists 3. Super-Overachievers 4. Crisis Manager 5. Devoted Loyalists 6. Self-Sacrificing Martyrs 7. Manipulators 8. Victims (Victim Consciousness) 9. Feelings of Inadequacy 10. Reactionaries Codependency Behavior Traits

24 1. External referencing 2. Lack of emotional boundaries 3. Impression management 4. Mistrust of one’s own perceptions 5. Martyr syndrome 6. Lack of spiritual health Codependency Behavior Traits

25 Helpless-Hopeless Personality

26 Locus of Control Internal vs. External

27 The Hardy Personality: Resiliency

28 1. Commitment 2. Control 3. Challenge

29 Resiliency 101 Positivity Creative Problem Solving Compassion and Gratitude Self-Care Humor Purpose in Life

30 Survivor Personality

31 Survivor Personality Biphasic Personality Traits

32 Sensation Seekers (Type R Personality)

33 Sensation Seekers (Type R Personality) People who examine the odds, take calculated risks and who live life to the fullest with confidence, self- efficacy, courage, optimism, and creativity.

34 Figure 6.4. While we may not be able to change our personality completely, we can change personality traits that tend to promote stress in our lives. Source: © Randy Glasbergen, used with permission from

35 Technology and Personality

36 Self-Esteem: The Bottom Line-Defense

37 Self-Esteem: The Bottom Line-Defense 1. The focus of action 2. The practice of living consciously 3. The practice of self-acceptance 4. The practice of self-responsibility 5. The practice of self-assertiveness 6. The practice of living purposely 7. The practice of personal integrity

38 Self-Esteem: The Bottom Line-Defense

39 Self-Esteem: The Bottom Line-Defense 1. Connectedness

40 Self-Esteem: The Bottom Line-Defense 1. Connectedness 2. Uniqueness

41 Self-Esteem: The Bottom Line-Defense 1. Connectedness 2. Uniqueness 3. Power (empowerment)

42 Self-Esteem: The Bottom Line-Defense 1. Connectedness 2. Uniqueness 3. Power (empowerment) 4. Models (mentors)

43 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem

44 1. Disarm the negative critic

45 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem 1. Disarm the negative critic 2. Give yourself positive affirmations

46 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem 1. Disarm the negative critic 2. Give yourself positive affirmations 3. Avoid self-guilt and “should haves”

47 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem 1. Disarm the negative critic 2. Give yourself positive affirmations 3. Avoid self-guilt and “should haves” 4. Focus on you and your identity

48 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem 1. Disarm the negative critic 2. Give yourself positive affirmations 3. Avoid self-guilt and “should haves” 4. Focus on you and your identity 5. Avoid comparisons

49 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem 1. Disarm the negative critic 2. Give yourself positive affirmations 3. Avoid self-guilt and “should haves” 4. Focus on you and your identity 5. Avoid comparisons 6. Diversify your interests

50 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem 1. Disarm the negative critic 2. Give yourself positive affirmations 3. Avoid self-guilt and “should haves” 4. Focus on you and your identity 5. Avoid comparisons 6. Diversify your interests 7. Improve your connectedness

51 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem 1. Disarm the negative critic 2. Give yourself positive affirmations 3. Avoid self-guilt and “should haves” 4. Focus on you and your identity 5. Avoid comparisons 6. Diversify your interests 7. Improve your connectedness 8. Avoid self-victimization

52 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem 1. Disarm the negative critic 2. Give yourself positive affirmations 3. Avoid self-guilt and “should haves” 4. Focus on you and your identity 5. Avoid comparisons 6. Diversify your interests 7. Improve your connectedness 8. Avoid self-victimization 9. Reassert yourself before and during stress

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