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ReadWriteServe Programs of the Center for Adolescent Literacies at UNC Charlotte ReadWriteServe Tutor Training.

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Presentation on theme: "ReadWriteServe Programs of the Center for Adolescent Literacies at UNC Charlotte ReadWriteServe Tutor Training."— Presentation transcript:

1 ReadWriteServe Programs of the Center for Adolescent Literacies at UNC Charlotte ReadWriteServe Tutor Training

2 What is ReadWriteServe? ReadWriteServe--Partnership for Literacy Action Initiatives brings together UNC Charlotte and community- based resources to address increasingly complex literacy needs of students and their families in the Southeastern U.S. through service, research and community-based programs that are culturally relevant and focused on community needs. RWS supports literacy and reading tutors working with students at different levels and in differing contexts. We offer a structured but flexible approach to tutoring that relies on tutors to make decisions about the needs of learners.

3 RWS Tutors Provide Homework Help Reading Support Mentoring A note about our terminology: Tutors-----UNC Charlotte student /staff volunteers Learners----the grades K-12 students receiving tutoring A note about our terminology: Tutors-----UNC Charlotte student /staff volunteers Learners----the grades K-12 students receiving tutoring

4 The RWS Commitment Set a time commitment that is reasonable and stick with it. We ask that you commit to meeting with a learner once a week if possible. Whatever your schedule, please keep your commitment to our student partners. Be ethical and responsible in all that you do in your work with student partners. You are mentors and role models.

5 Have questions? Need help? Check out the ReadWriteServe Tutor Blog at rwstutoring.wordpress.com Get tutoring tips Learn about upcoming events and trainings Ask questions & join a conversation

6 Before we get started… 3 Three things you want to learn today 2 Two things you want us to know about you 1 One thing you believe about reading

7 Jumping Right In Do’s & Don’ts of Tutoring

8 Scenario #1: What’s a Tutor to Do? You begin tutoring with a book. What do you do?

9 Scenario #1: What’s a Tutor to Do?

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11 You’ve just begin working with Alex, a 2 nd grade student who struggles a bit with reading. You sit down with Alex and open up Flat Stanley at Bat, an I Can Read Level 2 book. What do you say? What do you NOT say? What do you do? What do you NOT do? How do get started in tutoring Alex?

12 DO’S: Tutoring Tips Let the child hold the book and turn the pages Let the child set the pace Take time to look and talk—look at the pictures and talk about the book Listen, listen, listen Talk about their ideas and check your predictions from the picture walk “What did you like?” Talk about other good books and reading

13 Get to know each other Ice breaker & information

14 Assessment Overview of Tutoring Meeting the Learner Setting Expectations Evaluating the Learner Planning Tutoring Sessions

15 Formal vs. Informal Assessment INFORMAL ASSESSMENTFORMAL ASSESSMENT  Observations of the learner  Interviews or conversation with the learner (what the learner says he or she wants and needs)  Listening to a learner read or work a problem  Learner think-aloud with class work, homework, a book  Input from teachers and parents  Student retellings of a text  Standardized tests (End-of-Grade and End-of-Course tests)  Ability tests (IQ)  Teacher created tests and quizzes

16 Informal Assessment Assessment gives us information about what learners strengths and areas of need—what they can do and what they need help with. Here are some informal methods of assessment: Interview Learner Surveys 5-finger assessment Read Alouds Retellings

17 Our Approach: Guided Learning Our basic approach is to meet a learner at his or her point of need. You might help the learner with homework or in reading and writing. Most tutoring can be broken into this sim ple framework: Before Reading & Learning During Reading & Learning After Reading & Learning

18 Guided Reading & Learning Guided Reading & Learning is a type of instruction in which a tutor guides at student (learner) through the process of reading. Tutors are mentors to students. They help students (learners) move from reading with help to reading independently.

19 Instructional Sequence Rationale Before Reading & Learning Pre-reading & Learning To establish purpose, activate background knowledge, motivate & engage learner. Pre-reading activities  Previewing a book: Book Walk or Picture Talk  KWL  Talk about the subject or text During Reading & Learning Reader-Text Interactions Scaffold reading and learning. Make learning active. During-reading activities  Shared reading: Choral or Part Reading  Reread for fluency  Say Something  Think Pair Share  Double Entry Journal After Reading & Learning Post reading & Learning To extend and elaborate ideas from the text Post-reading activities  Retellings and discussion  Journaling  Concept Maps  Mini-lessons (teaching concepts & strategies)

20 Example 1: Sam in 7 th Grade Instructional SequenceActivitiesComments/Notes Before Reading & Learning To establish purpose, activate background knowledge, motivate & engage learner. Preview book—book walk KWL Talk about text or subject Pre-view Social Studies homework (worksheet) and pre-read textbook with Sam. Point out headings, subheads, and key words. During Reading & Learning Guided reading and learning. Make learning active. Shared reading: Choral or parts Reread for fluency Use Strategies --ThinkPairShare --DE Journal, etc Use Say Something strategy while reading text to help Sam verbalize what he is reading. Post ideas on sticky notes to help answer questions. After Reading & Learning To extend and elaborate ideas from the text Retellings & discussion Journaling, concept maps Mini Lessons Guide Sam in answering questions on worksheet. Check to see if he is using headings/subheads and notes to help answer questions.

21 Example 2: Rachel in 3 rd Grade Instructional SequenceActivitiesComments/Notes Before Reading & Learning To establish purpose, activate background knowledge, motivate & engage learner. Preview book—book walk KWL Talk about text or subject Introduce new books and Do a picture walk of the book that Rachel chooses to read. Have her make predictions. Point out a few words. New books: Three Questions, Lion and the Mouse, Strega Nona During Reading & Learning Guided reading and learning. Make learning active. Shared reading: Choral or parts Reread for fluency Use Strategies --ThinkPairShare --DE Journal, etc Guide reading. Ask recall questions and check for comprehension (“Does that make sense?”). Reread sections as needed to build fluency. Find 4 to 5 words to teach After Reading & Learning To extend and elaborate ideas from the text Retellings & discussion Journaling, concept maps Mini Lessons Ask: “Tell me about what you just read?” Teach the new words and review sight words.

22 Scenario #2: Planning for Sam Instructional SequenceActivitiesComments/Notes Before Reading & Learning To establish purpose, activate background knowledge, motivate & engage learner. Preview book—book walk KWL Talk about text or subject During Reading & Learning Guided reading and learning. Make learning active. Shared reading: Choral or parts Reread for fluency Use Strategies --ThinkPairShare --DE Journal, etc After Reading & Learning To extend and elaborate ideas from the text Retellings & discussion Journaling, concept maps Mini Lessons

23 Scenario #2: Planning for Sam You’ve been working with Sam, a 5 th grade student who loves science but struggles a bit with reading. Sam has difficulty remembering what he reads and finds new words challenging. Plan a lesson for Sam using Fossils as your book. It’s one he’s picked out and seems like it’s not too difficult.

24 Scenario #2: Planning for Sam

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26 Instructional SequenceActivitiesComments/Notes Before Reading & Learning To establish purpose, activate background knowledge, motivate & engage learner. Preview book—book walk KWL Talk about text or subject During Reading & Learning Guided reading and learning. Make learning active. Shared reading: Choral or parts Reread for fluency Use Strategies --ThinkPairShare --DE Journal, etc After Reading & Learning To extend and elaborate ideas from the text Retellings & discussion Journaling, concept maps Mini Lessons

27 Lesson Activities & Mini-lessons Here are some useful lesson activities and mini-lesson ideas: Book Walk or Picture Talks Guided Reading & Learning Dictating Stories or LEA Word Families & Word Sorts Sight Word practice Teaching Strategies

28 Book Walks & Picture Talks Tutors guide students through a book by looking at the cover, title page, and pictures in the book. Point out a few key words and ask the learner questions like, “What do you think is going on in the book?” and “What do you think will happen?” During the guided reading and learning session (the heart of the tutoring process), the tutor can check with the learner to confirm predictions.

29 Basics of the Book Walk, Picture Talk Start with the cover. Look at the picture Read the title and author Ask, “what do you think this book is about?” Take a picture walk. Without reading the words ask the child to turn the pages one at a time. Point to the pictures and ask, “What do you think is happening?” Use the 5 “W” and “H” questions

30 Basics of the Book Walk, Picture Talk Take a picture walk. Use the 5 “W” and “H” questions What is happening on this page? Where do you think they are going? How do you think it will end? Will they get to the house? Repeat what the child said but in your own words Add a bit more information

31 If time allows…try a book walk If you have a book available, do a quick book walk or picture talk with a partner. Talk about pictures Make predictions Point out the title and a few words you think are important to the story

32 Picking Texts to Read Comprehension Word Work: Vocabulary & Sight Words Fluency Decoding

33 Picking Texts to Read You can use any type of text to tutor from; however, if you get a chance to read for enjoyment, pick a good book (one that your student picks) that is not too difficult and enjoy reading for pleasure. Together with the student, you can choose reading material that interests the student and is at an appropriate reading level. One method for choosing a book is the five finger method. Remember Whenever possible, pick books that are interesting to the learner For tutoring, pick books are that at their Instructional Level (not too easy, not too hard) For independent (personal) reading, pick books at the Independent Level.

34 Picking books at the right level “Just right” book but when time is short use these strategies for finding a book that isn’t too challenging: Ballpark it! Working with a struggling 3 rd grader? Pick a book that looks like a 1 st or 2 nd grader could read it. Don’t worry. Just read it! Don’t worry if it is a “just right” book. Read aloud and talk with the child. Five Finger Rule. A quick and simple way to match a book to a kid.

35 Five Finger Rule As you or the child reads a page from a book, have them put a finger on any words they don't understand. The number of fingers used helps indicate the reading level. 0-1 fingers - too easy (Independent level) 2-3 fingers - just right (Instructional level) 4-5 fingers - too hard (Frustration level) Too easy is okay. Too hard isn’t. Remember that this is just a “quick & dirty” test.

36 Scenario #3: Struggling Reader

37 Scenario #3: Struggling Reader What do you see as this child’s reading challenges? What can we do in our tutoring to help her?

38 What to focus on in tutoring There are four key areas that we most often focus on in literacy tutoring. Comprehension Word Work: Vocabulary & Sight Words Fluency Decoding

39 Comprehension Comprehension is the “so what” of reading. Readers who comprehend understand and can answer questions about what they’ve read. Here are some strategies that help with comprehension: Say Something Double-entry Journal ThinkPairShare KWL Talking Drawings

40 Comprehension Strategies Say SomethingDouble-entry Journal Take turns reading and… Make a prediction Ask a question Clarify something you read Make a comment Make a connection Thoughts about the text before I read Thoughts after I read

41 Comprehension Strategies KWL ChartThinkPairShare What I KNOW WANT to know What I LEARNED By yourself, think about __________________ Share your thoughts with a partner or tutor Write down some new things you learned Works great with math problems

42 If time allows… Take a couple minutes and review pages 23 through 27 in your RWS Tutor Handbook. Think about the comprehension strategies and how you might use them. Look back at the lesson plan you created (if we had time) and think about strategies you might add. What strategies could you have used in tutoring in the past? Which strategies do you think you’d use in the future.

43 Word Work Sight words are the most common words that make up our spoken and written language. Fifty percent of all text is made up of the most common 100 sight words. Vocabulary refers to the meanings of words, not their spelling or pronunciation. Vocabulary is important to a reader’s success because comprehension breaks down when readers encounter too many words they do not know. Vocabulary words are new words that students must learn.

44 Sight Words Sight words are common words that a reader should recognize on "sight." These important words are also referred to as "high-frequency words.” Sight words are a group of common words with a high- frequency of use that readers must know on sight, instantly, and automatically in order to develop into an efficient and smooth reader. Some examples of these important words are a, is, the, of, and, that, in, you, I, and to. We include a copy of the list of Dolch Sight Words in the back of this handbook on page 55.

45 Vocabulary Vocabulary strategies help readers with words they don’t know and need to learn. We don’t expect them to have to memorize these words like we hope readers will do with sight words. Readers need strategies to include but go beyond teaching definitions and include pictures and connections to the real world. Do’sDon’ts Teach words that matterTeach words just because a learner doesn’t know it Teach a few words at a timeTeach 10, 15, 20 words (lists) at a time Teach words that the student will see and use again Teach words that you are unsure of

46 Sight Words & Vocabulary Repetition is the key to teaching sight words. Try this: Play Sight Word bingo Make sight word flash cards and review them each Here are some strategies that help teach vocabulary. Note that they move beyond simply teaching definitions. Vocabulary Cards Vocabulary Self-Awareness Chart How Well Do I Know These Words Teach common pre-fixes and root words

47 Vocab Cards & How Well Do I Know

48 Vocabulary Self-Awareness Chart

49 If time allows… Take two minutes and review pages 28 through 32 in your RWS Tutor Handbook. Think about the vocabulary strategies and how you might use them. Try your hand at creating a vocabulary card for a content area term like solar or cylinder.

50 Fluency Fluency is the ability to read accurately, effortlessly, at the appropriate pace, and with expression. Because fluent readers do not have to concentrate on figuring out the words, they can focus their attention on what the text means. In other words, fluent readers recognize words and comprehend at the same time. Less fluent readers, however, must focus their attention on figuring out the words, leaving them little attention for understanding the text.

51 Fluency Strategies Here are some strategies to help with fluency: Rereading. This is one of the best ways to help improve fluency. Echo Reading. Echo reading is a rereading strategy designed to help students develop expressive, fluent reading. In echo reading, the tutor reads a short segment of text (sentence or phrase), and the student echoes back the same sentence or phrase while following along in the text. Paying Attention to Punctuation. Some students read through periods. Point out end punctuation, model reading it, and have the learner reread.

52 Phonics & Decoding Phonics has to do with looking at the letters of a word, figuring out what sounds those letters make, and putting the sounds together to read the word. During phonics instruction we teach children the letter or letters that make each sound. Phonics instruction can also focus on patterns, such as the –ight pattern and all of the words that you can make from that pattern (flight, knight, light, might, night, plight, right, sight, and tight). Spelling is similar to phonics except that instead of reading, you are writing.

53 Decoding English has many irregular words. Consider these two: Ate and Eight However there are many word patterns you can teach. Here are a few: Spelling Rules. Late: the /e/ makes the /a/ say it’s name Word Families. –ight words, -ate words (late, fate, crate), -ad words (mad, bad, had) Note: Don’t spend too much time on decoding. Be sure to help with comprehension, vocabulary and fluency.

54 Decoding/Phonics Strategies Word Family Sorts Sticky-note Word Family Books

55 Tutoring Scenario You’ve just begun tutoring a new learner, Jose, a fifth-grader. You observe the following: ◦ Jose reads the words on the page well but as he says, “I just don’t get it.” You ask Jose to read aloud and his reading sounds fine but when you ask him to do a retelling he has little to say. ◦ He also says that some of the words in his science book are difficult. What can you do?

56 Reading with Learners There are many ways to organize reading—read aloud, partner reading, silent reading. Here are some different ways to organize reading when you work with a student: Read Aloud (oral reading). Have the student read aloud to you. Buddy Reading. You and the student take turns reading sections of a text and talking about it. Great questions include: “What do you think will happen next?” or “Does that make sense?” Choral Reading. Another good strategy for struggling readers is to read a text aloud together in unison. Silent Reading. Yes, this works in tutoring as well—especially for older students. You and the student read a text to an agreed upon stopping point and then discuss the passage. Not all reading has to be out loud. Read aloud is useful but can be uncomfortable for some learners.

57 Getting to Know the Learner Setting Expectations Evaluating the Learner Our Approach (Planning)

58 Getting to Know the Learner At the first meeting or two, the tutor and learner need to get to know one another. This initial session is an important step towards building a positive rapport that will underlie the tutoring and learning experience. Use this first meeting to: Establish rapport Setting expectations Get to know your learner

59 Ice Breakers Ice Breakers are games or activities we use to get to know a learner or “break the ice.” Here are a few of these activities: Acrostic Name Poem The Memory Game Two facts and a lie

60 Acrostic Name Poem NAMEAbout me… CCurious and loves to learn HHappy and has lots of friends RReally loves science IInterested in music and wants to play guitar SSports fanatic

61 Setting Expectations It’s important to establish expectations between the tutor and learner. You can do this through discussion or if you prefer, you can use the Literacy PALS Tutor-Learner Agreement that is in the back of your Literacy PALS Handbook. The main points are that both Tutor and Learner agree to: Come prepared to all tutoring sessions Arrive on time Listen and talk with each other Be respectful of each other

62 More than the sum of its parts Once in the land of Serenity there ruled a king called Kay Oss. He wanted to be liked by all his people. So onx day thx bxnxvolxnt dxspot dxcidxd that no onx in thex country would bx rxsponsiblx for anything. Zll of thx workerxrs rxstxd from thxir dzily lxbors. "Blxss Kzy Oss," thxy xxclzimxd. Now, thx lzw mzkxrs wxrx vxry wvsx. But zs wvsx zs wthxy wxrx, thxy dxcvdxd thzt thx bxst form of govxernmxnt wzs nonx zt zll. Zs tvmx wxnt qo, thx kvngdqm og Kzy qss bxgzn tq splvt zt thx sxzms znd vt lqqkxd lvkx thvs: Bex dqufghj klzm nqxp qqt rqst vqxwxxz bqxc dqf ghzj kqlxmnxp. The Kingdom Of Kay Oss

63 A word about mentoring

64 A word on mentoring Mentors are guides. They lead us along the journey of our lives. We trust them because they have been there before. They embody our hopes, cast light on the way ahead, interpret arcane signs, warn us of lurking dangers, and point out unexpected delights along the way. Student mentoring is defined as a one-to-one relationship between a youth and an adult that occurs over a prolonged period of time. The mentor provides consistent support, guidance, and concrete help to a student who is in need of a positive role model. Students involved in the mentoring program may be going through a difficult and/or challenging situation, a period of life in which they need extra support, or they may simply need to have another significant adult present in their life. The goal of student mentoring is to help students involved in the mentoring program to gain the skills and confidence to be responsible for their own futures

65 Web based resources like our websites and blogs Who to contact for help

66 Resources for Tutors The Center for Adolescent Literacies offers the following resources: RWS Tutoring website https://tutoring.uncc.edu/ RWS Tutoring blog Center for Adolescent Literacies website

67 Need help? Have questions? ReadWriteServe Programs are a part of the Center for Adolescent Literacies at UNC Charlotte. If you have questions or need our help, call or us: Dr. Bruce TaylorJean Vintinner


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