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[PROGRAM] Please use this document as a resource throughout the school year. If you have a question, check this manual first. *Adapted from the University.

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Presentation on theme: "[PROGRAM] Please use this document as a resource throughout the school year. If you have a question, check this manual first. *Adapted from the University."— Presentation transcript:

1 [PROGRAM] Please use this document as a resource throughout the school year. If you have a question, check this manual first. *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014

2 1. [PROGRAM PORTAL] [PROGRAM PORTAL] 2. Engineering Notebooks Engineering Notebooks 3. Intellectual property Intellectual property 4. ITAR/EAR ITAR/EAR 5. In Class In Class 6. [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] 7. Trac Wiki Trac Wiki 8. SVN SVN 9. Classroom lab & rules Classroom lab & rules 10. Inventory Use Policy Inventory Use Policy 11. Making meetings work Making meetings work 12. Sexual harassment Sexual harassment 13. At-risk At-risk 14. Material & Supplies Request Material & Supplies Request 15. Travel requests Travel requests 16. Professionalism and Termination Committees Professionalism and Termination Committees 17. Case Studies Case Studies Sections: [PROGRAM]

3 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 http://my [PROGRAM].ufl.edu/ Sign in with GatorLink account What’s in [PROGRAM PORTAL]? 1.News 2.Calendar (Google) 3.Project Information 4.Sponsor Information 5.Inventory SystemInventory System 6.Evaluations 7.Surveys 8.Assessments 9.Team Wiki 10.SVN Repository 11.Your Information (phone, email, etc.) Section 1: [PROGRAM PORTAL] Insert screenshots of Program Portal

4 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Be sure to update your info Insert screenshots of Program Portal Section 1: [PROGRAM PORTAL]

5 Why check [PROGRAM PORTAL]? Important groupings 1.News  On Evaluations, Surveys, Assessments open & close dates and times  Notes from the Director of [PROGRAM] 2.Calendar  to see when [PROGRAM] staff is available in the office or via email from 9am to 4pm  When [PROGRAM] lab is closed  When [PROGRAM] office is closed 3.Project Information  Project description, team contact information, coach contact information, door code for lab  Found under tab “My Team” 4.Sponsor Information  Contact information  Found under tab “My Team” 5.Inventory  Need an extra monitor, laptop, Oscilloscope, Analyzer, Caliper, Multimeter, universal counter? Grouping of evaluations, surveys, assessments 6.Evaluations 7.Surveys 8.Assessments  For you, your team, your coach, and the director as a track tool for you and your team’s direction, progress, and professional honesty  These affect your grade for both the coach and director contribution to your grade Grouping of Team Wiki & SVN Repository 9.Team Wiki  Tool for team to communicate with Coach and Sponsor Liaison-Company  Project management (Roadmap, Milestones, etc.)  Ticket system (bug tracking, tasks, etc.) 10.SVN Repository  SVN-your backup of all documentations 11.Your Information-Keep it updated *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 1: [PROGRAM PORTAL]

6 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Engineering Notebooks are documentation of the project Signatures rules Will be given to [PROGRAM] at end of class; sponsor will take it as well as a reference Not a Twitter page Must have in class and at all [PROGRAM] meetings Must have it when you speak to a vendor to use as reference for you, team, and sponsor Never staple or tape things into them Rules of pencil vs. pen Section 2: Engineering Notebooks Check out this helpful Google tutorial on how to make an Engineering Notebook: http://bit.ly/1fKOX24 http://bit.ly/1fKOX24 Put address as the [PROGRAM] office address : [PROGRAM ADDRESS] No page can be left blank; these notebooks can be put into patent submissions

7 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 3: Intellectual Property At some point you and your team will be seeking outside helper(s). Outside helper(s) can include but are not limited to: teaching assistants, graduate assistants, OPS workers, student workers, and other faculty per expertise, lab personnel, peer students, and outside [UNIVERSITY] members per expertise. 1.The team must discuss with your coach who will be helping with the project prior to receiving the help. 2.Remember the Non-Disclosure Agreement you signed. 3.Discuss with your coach what can and cannot be shared with the outside helper(s). 4.If team will have to disclose information to receive the help they need. Have your coach complete the following: a)Coach sends the list to [PROGRAM EMAIL] to state that coach approves the information disclosure to the outside helper(s) b)First and Last Name(s), [UNIVERSITY] email address(es) c)Include if you would like Outside Helper to have access to any of these: SVN, Wiki, or Lab Door Code

8 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 [PROGRAM NAME] 1.The undersigned, in consideration of the opportunity to participate in the [PROGRAM] Program at the [UNIVERSITY] (hereafter referred to as "UF"), hereby agrees as follows: 2.I understand that as a result of my work in the [PROGRAM] Program, intellectual property in the form of inventions, data, formulae, computer software specifications, products, processes, technologies, patents, copyrights, and other technical and product information (“Intellectual Property”) may be developed during the program. 3.I understand that [UNIVERSITY] and an [PROGRAM] Affiliate or Sponsor (“Partner”) have entered into an agreement to work jointly on an [PROGRAM] project provided by the Partner. That agreement specifies the party, (hereafter referred to as the “Owner”) that will own all intellectual property created as a result of the project. 4..I hereby assign to the Owner all of my rights and ownership interest to such Intellectual Property created as a result of and during my participation in the project. I agree to cooperate with the Owner, its assignee or designee in perfecting rights to such Intellectual Property, for example, by signing any documents that may be necessary to perfect the rights. I also understand that I am not entitled to receive any income from the sale or licensing of this Intellectual Property by the Owner. 5..I understand that in the event the Partner and/or a third party collaborating with Partner discloses to me information that is marked as confidential or proprietary, I will not, without express written consent of Partner or the third party, as the case may be, (1) disclose or publish any part of such information to others for a period of five (5) years from receiving the information; (2) make any use of such information for a five (5) year period except in the course of my participation in the [UNIVERSITY] [PROGRAM] Program. However, I further understand that I shall not be prevented from disclosing information when I can establish, by competent evidence, that such information: a.Was already known to me at the time of disclosure by Partner or a third party collaborator; or b.Was available to the public or otherwise was part of the public domain at the time of disclosure by Partner or a third party collaborator; or c.Became available to the public or otherwise became part of the public domain after the time of disclosure by Partner or a third party collaborator, but other than through my own acts or omissions in violation of this Agreement; or d.Was lawfully disclosed to me by a party not collaborating with Partner subsequent to the time of disclosure by Partner or a third party collaborator. 6.Immediately upon termination of my participation in the [PROGRAM] Program at [UNIVERSITY], I agree to return to[UNIVERSITY] all software, records, project notebooks, memoranda, information, data, programs, models and equipment of any nature in my possession or under my control pertaining to the program. Non-Disclosure Agreement ASSIGNMENT OF OWNERSHIP AND NONDISCLOSURE AGREEMENT You signed a non-disclosure agreement as well in [PROGRAM PORTAL] Section 3: Intellectual Property

9 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Academic 1.Terminated from [PROGRAM]class 2.[UNIVERSITY] Police arrest and/or investigation 3.Police arrest and/or investigation 4.Dean of Students, Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution hearings 5.Registration hold 6.Suspended from University a.prohibited from enrolling during suspended time period b.While suspended, a student is not eligible to transfer credits taken at another institution toward his/her [UNIVERSITY] degree. c.must comply with University re-enrollment plan unless told otherwise d.might not be allowed to enter institution system 7.Community service 8.Fines State and Federal 1.Federal, FBI, CIA, DEA, etc. offices arrest and/or investigation 2.Community service 3.Fines 4.Permit on your record 5.Jail time 6.Convicted of criminal, conspiracy, fraud and much more Section 3: Intellectual Property

10 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 4: ITAR & EAR This information is very important for the course of your project and Federal Law. Noncompliance can result in criminal and civil penalties for the individual as well as the University. ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) ITAR - Controlled Defense Articles and Technical Data The scope of items controlled for export purposes within the ITAR is defined by the United States Munitions List (USML ) http://www.pmddtc.state.gov/regulations_laws/docum ents/official_itar/ITAR_Part_121.pdf http://www.pmddtc.state.gov/regulations_laws/docum ents/official_itar/ITAR_Part_121.pdf EAR (Export Administration Regulations) Request the Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) from the manufacturer Check the Commerce Control List (CCL) http://www.access.gpo.gov/bis/ear/ear_data.h tml http://www.access.gpo.gov/bis/ear/ear_data.h tml You, your Team, your Coach: When you are looking up vendors for your team project needs (articles, materials, supplies, data, software, hardware, etc.) remember to look for ITAR, EAR, ECCN, CCL, USML information and if the vendor is certified to sell/buy these items (vendor is responsible for displaying information). Get it in writing! A verbal of no ITAR, EAR, ECCN, CCL, USML will not be accepted. Have it emailed to [PROGRAM EMAIL], or faxed to [PROGRAM FAX #] only with the item number and vendor contact information. Look for alternatives before requesting any items to remove any issues of ITAR or EAR.

11 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) EAR (Export Administration Regulations) This information is very important for the course of your project and Federal Law. Noncompliance can result in criminal and civil penalties for the individual as well as the University. The purchasing staff at [PROGRAM] will put a Project STOP on any items being requested for purchase if they are ITAR and/or EAR. ITAR & EAR "Project Stop" needs to be taken very seriously. 1.ALL project work MUST STOP. a.No matter what anyone says b.Until [UNIVERSITY] Contracts & Grants Office, Department of Sponsored Research gives us the green light, you cannot do any work on your project 2.A re-scoping of the project to remove/avoid ITAR/EAR elements 3.This will change the outcome of the project timeline you are given a.Slowing your customer needs b.Slowing your grade outcome Section 4: ITAR & EAR

12 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 5: In Class  Participation ◦ If using laptop and other devices in class, you will be watched and shouldn't be on Facebook, Netflix, Hulu, etc. or doing other things that are not class-related. ◦ When instructor or [PROGRAM] staff ask you to put your device away, please do so  Attendance is taken in four forms for the attendance grade 1.Sign-in sheet 2.Headcount (whole class count and team count) 3.Clicker count 4.Email Program Director 24 hours prior to class about missing class (unless you have a medical reason; in that case, contact us as soon as possible)  interview confirmation e-mail  conference e-mail  [UNIVERSITY] official sporting event  Uploading to [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] ◦ all uploads due each week must be uploaded on the day of class by NOON ◦ uploads must be placed in your team folder (unless instructed to place in individual dropbox) ◦ Draft versions of the uploads are good (this way we know where your team is in the project) ◦ Name file: (team name)(upload name) [example: Icey.HOQ.xlsx, Icey.SLDR.docx]  Read the emails from [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] [PROGRAM] class ◦ class changes and updates ◦ new uploads that are due ◦ reminders about uploads or events ◦ other announcements

13 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 [PROGRAM COURSE LINK] ◦ Go to [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM]. ◦ Sign in with [UNIVERSITY] account. ◦ Check to see if your “Drop Box” folder is there! ◦ You will be using your “Drop Box” folder later to upload your Sexual Harassment Prevention Training, At-Risk Training Certificates, and Lab Safety. Section 6: [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] 1. Syllabus Weekly topics Deliverables In-class Activities (if you do them with project intention, they help you with your project) 2. Resources Weekly Schedule folders Assigned seating Lectures Videos Readings Links to other resources, videos, audios, URLs Team Folders Upload team deliverables How To Do Audio/Video Other resources Training Manual Professional Reference Manual 3. Discussions- post questions on how to do a deliverable or anything engineering technique related. *Do NOT post questions about grades* 4. Remember to check your emails and/or the Mail system 5. Individual Drop Box (upload individual deliverables) 6. Grades Insert screenshot here

14 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 What is a wiki?  A wiki ( i /ˈwɪki/ WIK -ee) is a website that allows the creation and editing of any number of interlinked web pages via a web browser using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor. [1][2][3] Wikis are typically powered by wiki software and are often used collaboratively by multiple users. i /ˈwɪki/ WIK -ee website interlinkedweb pagesweb browser markup languageWYSIWYG [1][2][3]wiki softwareused collaboratively  Examples include community websites, corporate intranets, knowledge management systems, and note services. The software can also be used for personal notetaking.intranetsknowledge management notetaking  Wikis serve different purposes. Some permit control over different functions (levels of access). For example, editing rights may permit changing, adding, or removing material. Others may permit access without enforcing access control. Other rules can be imposed for organizing content.  Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as "the simplest online database that could possibly work." [4] "Wiki“ is a Hawaiian word meaning "fast" or "quick". [5] Ward CunninghamWikiWikiWeb [4]Hawaiian [5] Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikihttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki Definition Section 7: Trac Wiki

15 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  Project management (deliverables, milestones, etc.)  Ticket system (bug tracking, tasks, etc.)  Post your work  Post your contact information  Post your team logo The Team Wiki is a tool for you and your team to communicate with your Coach and Sponsor Liaison-Company Your Coach and Sponsor Liaison-Company have access to your Team Wiki (so please limit non-disclosure data e- mails ) Section 7: Trac Wiki

16 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  Trac uses a simple wiki language; although developed for software projects, Trac works well for all kinds of projects.  Each team will have a Trac site to post: Contact information Meeting schedule Meeting agendas and minutes Weekly Status Memos Action Registers/Issue Logs Archive of links to research Recall: no enabling technical project data can be stored on public web sites [PROGRAM] uses Trac for team wikis Section 7: Trac Wiki *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Insert screenshot here

17 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Trac formatting and editing guides  The previous page was created from this mark-up language  Note: See WikiFormatting and TracWiki for help on editing wiki content.WikiFormatting TracWiki  A nice tutorial on getting started with Trac: Jump-box Jump-box Section 7: Trac Wiki *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Insert screenshot here

18 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Complete This Assignment  [Use this slide to insert your program’s assignment to assess how much the student learned in the preceding section] Section 7: Trac Wiki

19 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 How to use the SVN The Trac wiki is tightly integrated with a version control management system called Subversion (SVN) SVN will provide a repository of documents, source code, and other electronic technical content (such as pictures, spreadsheets, videos, presentations, etc.) All teams are required to use SVN as their project data repository. No exceptions. What Is Subversion? Subversion is a free/open source version control system (VCS). That is, Subversion manages files and directories, and the changes made to them, over time. This allows you to recover older versions of your data or examine the history of how your data changed. In this regard, many people think of a version control system as a sort of “time machine.” Subversion can operate across networks, which allows it to be used by people on different computers. At some level, the ability for various people to modify and manage the same set of data from their respective locations fosters collaboration. Progress can occur more quickly without a single conduit through which all modifications must occur. And because the work is versioned, you need not fear that quality is the trade-off for losing that conduit—if some incorrect change is made to the data, just undo that change. Source: http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.6/svn-book.pdfhttp://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.6/svn-book.pdf Section 8: SVN

20 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Getting Started With SVN  In order to use SVN effectively, you will need to install an SVN client on your computer  PC users: download and install TortoiseSVN from Tigris.org  http://tortoisesvn.ti gris.org/ http://tortoisesvn.ti gris.org/  Mac OS: download and install SmartSVN by WANdisco  http://www.smartsv n.com/ http://www.smartsv n.com/  SVN is covered in depth in the book http://svnbook.red- bean.com/en/1.6/svn-book.pdf http://svnbook.red- bean.com/en/1.6/svn-book.pdf  Once you have TortoiseSVN installed, you are ready for your first SVN checkout  An excellent tutorial by Michael Ratchinsky (Jarden's Garden): YouTube. It explains how to install TortoiseSVNYouTube ◦ how to create a working copy, also known as a checkout. ◦ how to add files and folders to your checkout. ◦ how to delete files from your checkout. ◦ how to commit your changes. ◦ how to update your checkout. Section 8: SVN

21 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Repository  Server-side  Contains all versions Checkout  Local copy (client- side)  One version at a time Section 8: SVN

22 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Creating a checkout The only way to interact with the (remote) REPOSITORY is through a CHECKOUT! 1. Checkout (borrow) Section 8: SVN

23 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Creating a checkout When you create a CHECKOUT (local copy) of the repository, it’s like you borrowed a book from the library:  You can write on the pages, rip pages out, and glue new pages in. 1. Checkout (borrow) 2. Modify, Add, Delete Section 8: SVN

24 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Creating a checkout For everyone else to see the changes you made, you must COMMIT the changes back to the REPOSITORY, like checking in your book. 1. Checkout (borrow) 2. Modify, Add, Delete 3. Commit (check-in) Section 8: SVN

25 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 A scenario involving multiple editors. Harry Sally Section 8: SVN

26 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 8: SVN

27 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 8: SVN

28 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 8: SVN

29 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 8: SVN

30 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Subversion prevents overwriting files: Resource Locking Atomic Transactions Smart Merging Conflict Editing (manually) Section 8: SVN

31 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Other actions: Update [to revision X] Revert (local changes) Resolve conflicts Section 8: SVN

32 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 See also: http://svnbook.red-bean.com Section 8: SVN

33 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 8: SVN  [Use this slide to insert your program’s assignment to assess how much the student learned in the preceding section]

34 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 9: Classroom/Lab Rules Wi-Fi Access  How do you get [PROGRAM] wireless? Send Mac address to [EMAIL ADDRESS] Safety  Get acquainted with the office tool boxes and what they have in them  Remember there is surveillance video of the lab; do not answer door.  Keep in mind the NDA(s) you signed and Intellectual Property rules. Shipping If your sponsor is sending you something, please have them send it to [PROGRAM ADDRESS]

35 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  Non life-threatening injuries: ◦ Get to the first aid kit in [LOCATION] ◦ Report injury to [PROGRAM] Director  Life-threatening injuries: ◦ Exposure to hazardous substances ◦ Immediately flush the area for 15 min. (emergency shower or eye wash); or ◦ Seek fresh air ◦ Call 9-1-1 ◦ Notify [PROGRAM] Director  Report any damages done to [PROGRAM] and [UNIVERSITY] property Section 9: Classroom/Lab Rules

36 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  When the Fire Alarm goes off, please evacuate the building.  If a fire starts: ◦ Fire Extinguisher is located in [LOCATION]  Pull  Aim  Squeeze  Sweep  Find the Fire Alarm Pull Station in [LOCATION] by the glass door.  Do not use the elevator  Follow the illuminated “EXIT” signs to exit the building Section 9: Classroom/Lab Rules

37 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 9: Classroom/Lab Rules

38 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 1. No Food or Drink in [PROGRAM] classroom, conference rooms and lab. 2. Have your[UNIVERSITY]ID with you at all times. 3. Keep noise level to a professional ‘inside’ sound (voices, music, videos, conference calls, meetings, etc.). 4. Clean-ups should follow the completion of any operation (all classroom, conference room, lab users must clean up after themselves). 5. Lab equipment is to be safely operated and maintained according to manufacturer’s directions. 6. Lab appliances are plugged directly into electrical outlets (extension cords cannot be used as a permanent power supply). 7. Closed-toed shoes in lab at all times. 8. Watch your step, plug outlets on floors, white board wheels, cords for other uses. 9. Non-[PROGRAM] (students, staff, faculty, and other people) must be pre-approved by [PROGRAM DIRECTOR], Coach, and Sponsor, and have signed the Non-Disclosure Agreement and understand Intellectual Property before they are allowed to enter the classroom-lab. 10. Non-[PROGRAM] (students, staff, faculty, and other people) that do enter this classroom-lab are considered trespassing by [UNIVERSITY] Police Department.[UNIVERSITY] Physical Plant and[UNIVERSITY] Police Department staff may enter the lab. 11. If you are not a [UNIVERSITY] authorized personnel allowed to enter this door, [UNIVERSITY] Police Department will be called [UNIVERSITY POLICE PHONE #] and/or 911. 12. Don't answer a knock on the door. If you have sponsors coming to meet please coordinate accordingly by email to [PROGRAM DIRECTOR], Coach, and [PROGRAM] staff of their arrival date, time. 13. Surveillance cameras are in use. Do You Hear a Knock? Don’t answer. If you are worried about your safety, please dial [PROGRAM PHONE #] or 911 Section 9: Classroom/Lab Rules

39 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 The [PROGRAM] program has a limited amount of equipment and tools available to assist project teams in completion of their projects. This equipment use policy was developed to ensure the equipment is available and operable for as many teams as possible. Please do your part by treating the equipment as if it belonged to you. Section 10: Equipment Use Policy & Inventory 1.Request equipment using the [PROGRAM] Equipment Catalogue which you can access online through [PROGRAM PORTAL]. 2.You may move equipment from the [PROGRAM] lab to another location on campus only if the location where it will be used is indicated on the request form and approved prior to pick up. 3.Equipment must be maintained in good working condition as it was when you received it. 4.Important: Read the manual! Get training before you use any unfamiliar equipment. Observing safety precautions can prevent death or permanent injury. 5.Only trained users may operate the equipment. 6.Pick up equipment: a.In [LOCATION] at the time(s) set forth in the confirmation E-mail and by the date designated. If you fail to pick up on time, then the equipment will be returned to inventory so others may request its use. b.Confirmation e-mail states the inventory item is in your locker, please, sign paperwork and return to [PROGRAM] office. 7.Keep all equipment secured and stored at the location you indicated at all times. 8.Use equipment ONLY for the purpose needed for the team project. It is not to be used by anyone not on or not working with the team 9.Please, report any inoperative, lost, or broken equipment to [PROGRAM EMAIL] right away (be aware there might be costs for replacing or repairing equipment) 10. If you require more time, you must receive approval by e-mail from the [PROGRAM] Staff. Failure to get an extension will NOT be tolerated. 11.Equipment Return: a.You will have a certain amount of time depending on which item you check out; check-in due dates will vary. b.Any equipment found to be inoperative when [PROGRAM] staff receives it requires immediate notification to Director of [PROGRAM]. c.Equipment return time will be during working hours; otherwise, a prior set appointment return time will be needed.

40 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  Organization ◦ Agenda ◦ Note keeper ◦ Time keeper  Full participation  Safety to speak, listen, and collaborate  Policies  Meeting Minutes  List of Attendees  Tasks, Progress, Deadlines  Roles  Consensus of agenda  Decisions made  New items  Action Items (Assignments)  Upload on SVN for your Coach, Liaison, Sponsors  Upload to [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] in team folder Section 11: Making Meetings Work Reduce your minutes workload with an agenda Post your project status prior to agenda creation 1-minute verbal status report during meeting Capture your meeting minutes by having each person from team have an agenda item to record -Or- Assign a scribe (rotate in someone new every few weeks) One person with a laptop so notes can be taken down faster GoToMeeting and Skype are online meeting source, check with sponsor for other online meeting sources Professionalism Policies be prepared prior to meeting no-interruption policy time limit speaking policy personal attacks and put-downs prohibit keep time and finish on time say 'yes, and' instead of 'no & but' Things not to do (remember your professionalism) hold side conversations talk, text, play on your device work on homework or unrelated tasks

41 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Sexual Harassment Prevention Certificate [Contact your University to see how students may obtain Sexual Harassment Prevention Certificate.] Section 12: Sexual Harassment Prevention Training

42 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 At-Risk Certificate [Contact your University to see how students may obtain At-Risk Certificate.] Section 13: At-Risk Training

43 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Materials & Supplies Request Your own out-of-pocket purchases will not be reimbursed by [PROGRAM]. No purchases can be done on your own, so the items must be requested and then approved by your coach and/or the [PROGRAM] Director. Then the [PROGRAM] staff will order the items. Before requesting a purchase; consider the following: 1.Have you done enough research/decision making/justification for this purchase? 2.Are there alternative materials and/or supplies? 3.Are these items available locally? 4.Was this the best price for value? 5.Are there alternative vendors? 6.Location of vendor is important during the winter months – shipping, building of parts, or parts being delivered to vendor in the states that are affected by the winter weather could delay your order. (Please think ahead.) 7.Make sure you are actually ready to order. Once the approval email is received, ordering occurs rapidly. 8.Can you get a free sample? If so, follow How to do a Materials & Supplies Request Section 14: Materials & Supplies Request

44 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 How to Do a Materials & Supplies Request What is needed in the body of the email: 1.Vendor name 2.Vendor website 3.Vendor phone 4.Vendor contact (if applicable) 5.Item name a)Include item description b)And item cost 6.Only attachments permitted are vendor quotes and drawings for vendor 7.Justification (we will not order or request a justification if it’s not there-it is your team’s responsibility to keep track of this.) We might need to contact you if we have a question or if we need clarification on your justification prior to ordering. Please make sure your email address and phone number are up-to-date in [PROGRAM PORTAL] Once the email request has been approved and sent to [PROGRAM EMAIL] the items requested will be ordered. [PROGRAM] will notify you if there is any lead time on your order. You have two email options: Email coach the order for approval and then have the coach forward request to [PROGRAM EMAIL] with “approved” on top line in the body of the email. OR Email [PROGRAM EMAIL] and Cc: coach and ask for approval from coach, coach will then have to reply all and write “approved” in top line in the body of e-mail **If coach is not available please ask the [PROGRAM] Director to approve the purchase request.** Section 14: Materials & Supplies Request

45 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 1.sponsor wants to buy it 2.to be used in our prototype 3.best technology on hand Will be rejected and you will need to resubmit a more detailed justification. [PROGRAM] Director and Coach will be alerted to rejected justification. 1.router with 5 ports 2.need power 3.communication between devices 4.cord grips 5.connectors 6.used in mounting 7.sulfur acid Will be sent back with questions and you will need to resubmit a more detailed justification 1.product will be used in both test and final product. These are main components the heat sensor; which complies with the sponsor need specs of 100-400 degree detection, humidity level, and mounting capability. 2.The shield will protect prototype, housing material, and team members working on unit in the event of a breakage in hose, or valve. N 3.Need to use chip as a debugger and controller to interface with PC, logic analyzer. This chip runs 12C, SPI and ADC interfacing which our testing will be checking on and following our house of quality requirements: interface must debug at buffer 1 million, without logging into console 4.acid used in lab operations, test soil content, for the filtering and visualization of size of contents. 5.Art clay used to build mock up models of prototype consistent in size, weight, height to make guidelines for future setting, testings. This will help imitate actual prototype at a lower cost and can be viewed in ultraviolet microscope needed to test fluid movement around clay. Will be accepted and ordered STOP PROCEED WITH CAUTION GOOD TO GO Justifications Examples Section 14: Materials & Supplies Request

46 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Your items will be inside your team locker. Please use your door codes to open locks on lockers. Your team will be notified only if pickup is in [PROGRAM OFFICE LOCATION]. Section 14: Materials & Supplies Request

47 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Before Traveling ask your team and sponsor: What are the goals for this travel visit? Is it critical that all team members travel? Can the goals of this travel be done in another way (via video conference)? Can video of the process from a liaison engineer be sent to the team? Is this a travel to a conference, who on the team can committee to travel? If you still need to travel: 1.Email all travel requests to [PROGRAM EMAIL] 2.You are representing the [UNIVERSITY]'s official business during travel. Please, uphold the [UNIVERSITY] honor, policy, and rules. 3.Assign a Team Travel Contact who will do all the travel with the [PROGRAM] Program Assistant. Team Travel must include the following: 1.Names of team members who are traveling 2.Purpose of travel 3.What each team member's job is during the travel 4.Date/time departure 5.Date/time return 6.Driver name(s) (teams with 7 or more including coach traveling will need a second driver) hotel and flight (if needed); please include in e-mail 4. For liability purposes all travel needs to be approved prior to travel (even if it is local). The [PROGRAM] Director is the only approver for using your personal vehicle during [PROGRAM] travel. (If approved, you will be paid back only for mileage, tolls, and parking. NO FUEL CHARGES WILL BE PAID BACK.) Section 15: Travel

48 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 All food will be paid by [PROGRAM], unless sponsor provides your meal(s) during travel $6.00 breakfast, $11.00 lunch, $19.00 dinner=$36.00/day. One day travel will not cover meals by the [UNIVERSITY]. If Coach, or team member pays for meal the meal will be covered to the payee. If Sponsor pays for meal the meal will not be covered. All receipts (taxi, bus fare, tolls, parking, gas) must be obtained, kept, & turned in to the [PROGRAM] Program Assistant in [LOCATION]. Please leave receipts in folder on door with your first and last name and team name on each receipt Expense report will be made, approved,and ready for the traveler's signature. After the expense report is approved, the [PROGRAM] Program Assistant will e-mail your team leader to say the travel expense reports are ready to be signed. Reimbursement check will be deposited into your [UNIVERSITY] paycheck if currently a [UNIVERSITY] employee OR your reimbursement check will be ready for you to pick up in [PROGRAM OFFICE LOCATION]. [PROGRAM] Program Assistant will email your team to say reimbursement has been issued and is ready to be picked up. Check must be cashed before Fall or Spring semester classes are done. Grade may be withheld on account of lack of professionalism if you fail to cash check. Section 15: Travel

49 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  The [PROGRAM] Professionalism committee is comprised of 2 [PROGRAM] faculty members, the team member’s Coach, Director, and a Counseling and Wellness Center member who will meet and formalize a plan for behavioral and professional improvement for the student. This meeting will be called if any of the [PROGRAM] Professional Competency Model competencies are hindering you and/or your team. If the improvements are not met the next step is the Termination Policy.[PROGRAM] Professional Competency Model competencies  The process is that there is a time period of investigation. Then a meeting is set. Team member or team needs to bring their Engineering notebooks to the meeting. Engineering notebooks might be held by committee Section 16: Professionalism and Termination Professionalism Committee Report any unprofessionalism on the part of a team member, coach, liaison, [PROGRAM] staff, vendor staff, and people you come in contact with during your [PROGRAM]-[UNIVERSITY] business you may contact any of the [PROGRAM] staff, [PROGRAM] coaches, and/or [PROGRAM] Director.

50 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 The Termination committee is comprised of the same people as the Professionalism Committee. [PROGRAM] has a detailed procedure for terminating students whose participation or lack of participation on the project team jeopardizes the ability of the project team to successfully meet the academic goals of the [PROGRAM] program and/or the sponsored project goals. Detrimental team member behaviors include, but are not limited to, lack of participation in team activities, refusal to complete required deliverables on time, insubordination towards the project coach, project sponsor, liaison engineer, [PROGRAM] Director or an [PROGRAM] staff member, unprofessional conduct during project travel, extremely poor team member evaluations, and poor attendance. Students who exhibit these behaviors or embody these characteristics will meet with their project coach and be provided with a written description of the unacceptable actions/behaviors and an action plan for correcting the unacceptable behavior. Progress on the action plan will be monitored and if satisfactory progress is made, then the student may continue with [PROGRAM]. Otherwise, the coach will collect peer feedback and consult with the [PROGRAM] Director to determine a course of action. The offending student will meet with the coach and [PROGRAM] Director to determine if the student can continue with [PROGRAM]. Fall semester: If the student is terminated, then the student will receive an appropriate grade, up to and including a failing grade, and will not be allowed to register for the following [PROGRAM] semester, nor have access to any of the [PROGRAM] facilities or project team resources. Spring semester: If a student is terminated, then the student will receive a failing grade and will have access to [PROGRAM] facilities and project team resources revoked. Section 16: Professionalism and Termination

51 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Section 16: Professionalism and Termination *Adapted from the University of Florida’s Office of Human Resource Services “Leadership Competency Model

52 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Competency Definition Advocacy Conveys confidence in ability to be successful, especially at challenging new tasks Supports and promotes faculty, staff, and sponsors’ and peers’ interests. Supports fair treatment and opportunity for all Takes the lead and champions an idea or position Emotional Intelligence Knows self and understands that own mindset and behavior can affect others Senses others' feelings and perspectives and responds accordingly Controls and filters emotions in a positive way Effectively manages relationships Humility Is approachable Shares credit Admits mistakes Shows respect for others Realizes that personal success is connected to team success Integrity Models, fosters, and reinforces ethical behavior in self and others in all business activities and decisions Maintains trust about confidential and sensitive information Follows through on commitments Role Model Sets an example for others by exemplifying professional behavior Maintains consistency between words and actions Stays current on practices and trends in area of skills Fosters a commitment to and appreciation for diversity Self-care Advocates for himself or herself Manages outside relationships so they don’t affect his or her work Is honest about his or her ability to get the work done Maintains healthy eating, sleeping, and self-care habits (working out, going out with friends, staying in touch with family) Seeks help for mental, physical, or emotional fatigue Transparency Tells the truth Provides accurate information in a timely manner Explains decisions to instill trust Facilitates access to information Ensures that motives are clear (no hidden agendas) Build Trust Section 16: Professionalism and Termination *Adapted from the University of Florida’s Office of Human Resource Services “Leadership Competency Model

53 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Competency Definition Coaching/Mentoring Identifies and nurtures talents in others Provides open, honest feedback, reinforcing and redirecting behaviors as needed Addresses communication and performance issues promptly Delegates responsibility and authority to the lowest appropriate level Removes barriers by providing the right tools and resources as well as accurate information needed to achieve goals Adjusts team leader position style to best serve the team Collaboration Seeks and encourages diverse opinions and input from others Shares knowledge and information Encourages and receives cooperation from others Fosters teamwork Creates culture that encourages sharing Facilitative Decision- Making Effective group interactions Builds consensus Reacts appropriately -doesn't over- or under-react to a situation Knows when to close a discussion and move to a decision Willing to assert authority when necessary Seeks and values input when making decisions Resolve Willing to state an opinion, have a conversation, or make a decision even if there may be opposition or difficulty Gives people candid and helpful feedback Approaches challenging tasks with a willing attitude Talent Appreciation Assesses current and future needs based on goals and budget realities Understands and uses effective communication techniques to express one’s skills Values diverse skills Cultivate Talent Section 16: Professionalism and Termination *Adapted from the University of Florida’s Office of Human Resource Services “Leadership Competency Model

54 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Competency Definition Accountability Articulates high standards and ensures self and others execute to those standards Is consistent Fosters culture of responsibility within and between work units Execution Determines creative processes to get things done Organizes and mobilizes people, resources, and activities to achieve success, within budget and on time Establishes and maintains commitment to goals Follows tasks through to completion and takes responsibility for results Fair and Legal Management Maintains a fair and legal work environment Understands and complies with university, state, and federal requirements Maintains understanding of Nondisclosure Agreements Understands and complies with the At Risk and Sexual Harrassment trainings and policies and [UNIVERSITY] Student Conduct and Honor codes Financial Management Uses cost-benefit thinking to set priorities Manages budget within set parameters Understands [PROGRAM] financial processes Judgment Learns from mistakes Practices good listening skills Can perceive situation and respond accordingly Makes timely and sound decisions *Adapted from the University of Florida’s Office of Human Resource Services “Leadership Competency Model Generate Alignment Section 16: Professionalism and Termination

55 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Competency Definition Communication Clearly and effectively expresses self, using both formal and informal methods Actively listens to others. (Active listening involves not just hearing what the other is saying, but consciously trying to understand him/her by asking questions, providing feedback, and deferring judgment.) Regularly invites dialogue and candid feedback from others Ensures minority opinions are heard Plans and delivers impactful, persuasive communications Delivers proactive communications on key issues Maintains visibility Problem-solving Recognizes the group consensus of the problem to work on Ability to discuss questions and engage feedback Gathers resources needed to work on a problem Looks for creative and innovative solutions Organizational Aptitude Understands the sponsor’s requirements and goals Understands how to navigate the organization’s goals Operates effective communications within the organization Strategic Thinking Develops goals and communicates professional and engineering creativity Sets clear expectations and priorities Thinks proactively and discusses concepts to achieve goals Seeks out diverse perspectives when developing strategy Create and Communicate Vision Section 16: Professionalism and Termination *Adapted from the University of Florida’s Office of Human Resource Services “Leadership Competency Model

56 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  Now that you’ve thoroughly read the class syllabus and all the preceding slides in this document, you’re ready to do some Case Studies.  These are designed to prepare you for real-life [PROGRAM] scenarios that could possibly happen.  This is an appropriate time to review the Student Honor Code [INSERT LINK TO UNIVERSITY HONOR CODE].  For each case study, think about your response before moving forward. Section 17: Case Studies

57 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 In Class 1. Attendance Attendance 2. Classwork Classwork 3. Inappropriate Lab Conversations Inappropriate Lab Conversations 4. Lab Clean-Up Lab Clean-Up 5. Lockers Lockers 6. Unfinished Work Unfinished Work [PROGRAM] Travel 7. Alcoholic Beverages Alcoholic Beverages 8. Unsuitable Mingling Unsuitable Mingling 9. TSA Regulations TSA Regulations Purchasing 10. Non-Approved Purchases Non-Approved Purchases 11. Last-Minute Requests Last-Minute Requests 12. Same-Day Orders Same-Day Orders 13. Delayed Deliveries Delayed Deliveries 14. Conflict of Interest Conflict of Interest At-Risk 15. Uncomfortable Comments Uncomfortable Comments 16. Teammate Behavior Teammate Behavior 17. Team Arguments Team Arguments Business 18. Gender Roles Gender Roles 19. Cell Phones Cell Phones 20. Lab Phone Lab Phone 21. Sponsor = Client Sponsor = Client Safety 22. Proper Use of Tools Proper Use of Tools 23. Broken Equipment Broken Equipment 24. Open-Toed Shoes Open-Toed Shoes Intellectual Property 25. Non-[PROGRAM] Students Non-[PROGRAM] Students 26. Project STOP Project STOP 27. Product Safety Product Safety Section 17: Case Studies

58 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ One of your friends in the [PROGRAM] program says they can’t make it to class today. They ask you to sign in for them on the attendance sheet. There are more than 100 students in the class, so maybe no one will notice. What do you do? Back to Case Studies TOC Section 17: Case Studies

59 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ One of your friends in the [PROGRAM] program says they can’t make it to class today. They ask you to sign in for them on the attendance sheet. There are more than 100 students in the class, so maybe no one will notice. What do you do?  Never sign the attendance sheet for someone who is not in class.  As someone who is preparing to be a professional engineer, you need to display integrity at all times. Signing for someone else or asking someone else to sign for you is a dishonest act.  Not only is this an honesty issue, but it is also against class policy. Attendance is an element of professionalism, and if someone in the class is not taking attendance seriously, there are bigger issues that need to be resolved. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

60 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ During class, you and your team are asked to work on an activity. Your teammate John refuses to work on the activity, and he simply sits back and lets the rest of the team do all of the work. This becomes a repetitive problem, and your other teammates constantly complain about it, but they have never said anything to John. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

61 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ During class, you and your team are asked to work on an activity. Your teammate John refuses to work on the activity, and he simply sits back and lets the rest of the team do all of the work. This becomes a repetitive problem, and your other teammates constantly complain about it, but they have never said anything to John. What do you do?  Confront John about it and remind him that the [PROGRAM] class is centered around working in a team environment--just the way it will be in the professional engineering world.  If it continues to be a problem, notify an [PROGRAM] staff member and the Director. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

62 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ One of your teammates constantly talks about non-[PROGRAM] related topics (relationships, sports, gossip, etc.) when your team meets in the classroom. It is distracting you and your other teammates, but so far no one has said anything. You feel uncomfortable because you want to get along well with all of your team, but you also want to do well on your project. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

63 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ One of your teammates constantly talks about non-[PROGRAM] related topics (relationships, sports, gossip, etc.) when your team meets in the classroom. It is distracting you and your other teammates, but so far no one has said anything. You feel uncomfortable because you want to get along well with all of your team, but you also want to do well on your project. What do you do?  Remember, the whole classroom lab can hear you. It is an open space.  Kindly remind your teammate that the classroom lab is a place to learn new concepts, practice professionalism, and work to solve real-world engineering problems by collaborating with your team on your project.  The classroom lab is not a place to vent about relationships or gossip about classmates, [PROGRAM] staff, or professors. (Again, remember everyone can hear you.)  There’s nothing wrong with trying to be conversational/social and maybe getting off topic for a few minutes; just remember this is a professional meeting, so don’t talk about non-[PROGRAM] related topics for too long.  If your teammate continues to be distracting, even after you’ve explained this to them, please notify your team’s coach.  If it still doesn’t change, notify an [PROGRAM] staff member and the Director. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

64 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You and your teammates are working on your prototypes in the classroom lab. When it’s time to go, one of your teammates leaves their equipment lying on the table and leaves the room. You’re not the one who made the mess, and you see an [PROGRAM] lab assistant working nearby. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

65 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You and your teammates are working on your prototypes in the classroom lab. When it’s time to go, one of your teammates leaves her equipment lying on the table and leaves the room. You’re not the one who made the mess, and you see an [PROGRAM] lab assistant working nearby. What do you do?  Never ask a student assistant or other [PROGRAM] employee to clean up after you or your teammates in the classroom lab--it is not their job to do so. If you see one of your teammates leaving tools or other supplies out, be sure to ask them to please put them back where they belong.  However, if you see someone outside of your team leave something out, and you don’t know that person’s locker/don’t have access to it, feel free to let an [PROGRAM] staff member know, so they can put it back in the correct place. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

66 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You’re in the [PROGRAM] lab working on your project, and it’s pouring rain outside. You don’t want to haul your lunch, book bag, and gym clothes around with you out in the storm. Your team’s locker is pretty empty today, and you could use it to store your belongings just for the afternoon. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

67 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You’re in the [PROGRAM] lab working on your project, and it’s pouring rain outside. You don’t want to haul your lunch, book bag, and gym clothes around with you out in the storm. Your team’s locker is pretty empty today, and you could use it to store your belongings just for the afternoon. What do you do? Lockers are for [PROGRAM] class projects only. You may not store your lunch, book bag, gym clothes, other class projects, or anything else that is not directly related to your [PROGRAM] class project. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

68 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 The [PROGRAM] Director asks you to turn in your Preliminary Design Report, but you've only spent an hour on it, and it's nowhere near where you want it to be. It's not the best representation of what you're capable of. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

69 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 The [PROGRAM] Director asks you to turn in your Preliminary Design Report, but you've only spent an hour on it, and it's nowhere near where you want it to be. It's not the best representation of what you're capable of. What do you do? Hand it in, even if it's a work in progress. [PROGRAM] just wants to see where you are in the process. When you don't hand it in, it looks like you're not doing any work at all- which is worse. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

70 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You and your team have just been invited to visit your sponsor in Jacksonville. While on the trip, your sponsor takes you and your team out for dinner, offers to pay for everything, and encourages you to order whatever you like. During dinner, your sponsor drinks a beer and offers to order a round of drinks for the whole team. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

71 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You and your team have just been invited to visit your sponsor in Jacksonville. While on the trip, your sponsor takes you and your team out for dinner, offers to pay for everything, and encourages you to order whatever you like. During dinner, your sponsor drinks a beer and offers to order a round of drinks for the whole team. Do you accept? What do you do? The professional action is to not drink because you must remember you are on an 8-month interview with this sponsor, and your actions are being watched and noted. While you may feel it is appropriate to mirror your sponsor’s behavior, it might not actually work for you in the long run. Also, keep in mind who is driving. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

72 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ A professional engineer you met at the System Level Design Review invites you to network and mingle with his colleagues after work at their favorite bar. You know this is an opportunity to make a good impression with professionals in your field, and it might help you land a job after graduation, but you’re not sure if a bar is the appropriate place to meet. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

73 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ A professional engineer you met at the Senior Level Design Review invites you to network and mingle with his colleagues after work at their favorite bar. You know this is an opportunity to make a good impression with professionals in your field, and it might help you land a job after graduation, but you’re not sure if a bar is the appropriate place to meet. What do you do?  Whether or not you go largely depends on what type of establishment you are invited to. If it is a strip club or other unsavory/unprofessional place (use your judgment), do not go because you are on [UNIVERSITY] business travel. If you aren’t sure, just call the place ahead of time to see what type of establishment it is and to see if there are any special events happening that night that you might not want to be a part of.  The professional behavior is to not drink while networking with potential future employers. Once again, see this as an 8-month interview for a job after graduation. You do not want to do anything that may compromise your reputation.  Instead of giving out your personal information, ask for their business card, and tell them you will email them your resume. Do not give them your cell phone number this early on because you miss out on the opportunity to send them your professional information (resume). Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

74 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 You and your team are going to fly to visit a sponsor and you need your government-issued ID according to TSA regulations. The flight is soon, and you just realized your government-issued ID is back home and you don't have time to get it. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

75 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 You and your team are going to fly to visit a sponsor and you need your government-issued ID according to TSA regulations. The flight is soon, and you just realized your government-issued ID is back home and you don't have time to get it. What do you do?  Remember communication is important. Tell your team and your coach. Contact the [PROGRAM] Director or the Program Assistant immediately and let him or her know. If there is enough time, [PROGRAM] can get the ID overnighted to you.  One of the consequences may be that you will not be able to go on the trip.  [PROGRAM] will lose funding if you do not go on the trip; therefore, you may not be able to go on future trips. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

76 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You and your team are meeting with your sponsor to discuss your project. Your sponsor tells you to purchase a part for your prototype, even though your coach, [PROGRAM] Director, and [UNIVERSITY] do not know about it. Your sponsor tells you that you have to do it, and assures you it is okay because it is a project-related expense and the sponsor’s company will pay for it. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

77 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You and your team are meeting with your sponsor to discuss your project. Your sponsor tells you to purchase a part for your prototype, even though your coach, [PROGRAM] Director, and[UNIVERSITY] do not know about it. Your sponsor tells you that you have to do it, and assures you it is okay because it is a project-related expense and the sponsor’s company will pay for it. What do you do?  Do not purchase it. Never do anything the sponsor tells you to do unless it has been approved by [PROGRAM] and [UNIVERSITY]. If a sponsor is being demanding and asking you to break the rules, notify an [PROGRAM] staff member and the Director immediately.  Also, keep in mind that you should never purchase anything without prior approval because your own out-of-pocket purchases will not be reimbursed by [PROGRAM]. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

78 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ Your sponsor sends you an email stating you must tell the [PROGRAM] staff that the sponsor needs an item overnighted to be received tomorrow. You know you’re not supposed to make last-minute purchasing requests, but you want to do a good job for your sponsor. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

79 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ Your sponsor sends you an email stating you must tell the [PROGRAM] staff that the sponsor needs an item overnighted to be received tomorrow. You know you’re not supposed to make last-minute purchasing requests, but you want to do a good job for your sponsor. What do you do? Let your sponsor know that you will do the best you can. But remind your sponsor that the [PROGRAM] staff have multiple responsibilities and cannot always accommodate last-minute requests or requests to get something done sooner. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

80 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You emailed the [PROGRAM] Program Assistant with a purchase request, and in the email you stated that the item had to be ordered that same day. It’s been 2 hours, and you still haven’t gotten a response. You have a deadline approaching, and you’re getting anxious. A teammate says you should go to the Program Assistant’s office right away because it is urgent. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

81 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You emailed the [PROGRAM] Program Assistant with a purchase request, and in the email you stated that the item had to be ordered that same day. It’s been 2 hours, and you still haven’t gotten a response. You have a deadline approaching, and you’re getting anxious. A teammate says you should go to the Program Assistant’s office right away because it is urgent. What do you do?  Here is the process you should follow when you make any sort of request of an [PROGRAM] staff member:  Check the Purchasing Excel Sheet in [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] in Announcements  If you are unable to wait for this to be posted, you can call or email.  When calling, be professional and patient. Try not to leave 10 messages in 30 minutes. Remember the [PROGRAM] staff members have many requests coming from many students, sponsors, coaches, etc.  Special note on purchase requests: [PROGRAM] will try to fulfill orders on the same day, but due to a large amount of requests, this isn’t always possible. This is why it is important to plan ahead when purchasing items.  Remember, because of ITAR and EAR contractual limitations, sometimes the process may be slowed down, and there is nothing [PROGRAM] can do to speed it up. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

82 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ Your team’s purchase request was approved, and the Program Assistant ordered the item. It’s been two weeks, and the item still has not arrived. You and your team are frustrated because you expected the delivery time to be about 4 days. You find out that the vendor ran out of a part that was needed, and it will take 3 weeks to get the part that is essential to building the item you purchased. Your coach keeps hounding you about getting the item in immediately, and you are worried this will affect your grade. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

83 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ Your team’s purchase request was approved, and the Program Assistant ordered the item. It’s been two weeks, and the item still has not arrived. You and your team are frustrated because you expected the delivery time to be about 4 days. You find out that the vendor ran out of a part that was needed, and it will take 3 weeks to get the item, which is essential to building the item you purchased. Your coach keeps hounding you about getting the item in immediately, and you are worried this will affect your grade. What do you do?  You should explain to your coach that sometimes, due to circumstances completely out of your (or anyone else in [PROGRAM]’s) hands, there will be roadblocks in getting the item in a timely manner. If your coach, sponsor, or someone on your team repeatedly harasses you about speeding up the purchasing process, even after you’ve explained this to them, please notify an [PROGRAM] staff member.  You should not:  Hound the vendor. They will contact [PROGRAM] if this happens.  Call the [PROGRAM] staff repeatedly and demand the process be hurried along  Try to go around the [PROGRAM] policy and purchase the item yourself. (Not only would you be violating [UNIVERSITY] and [PROGRAM] policy, but you also would not be reimbursed for the out-of-pocket purchase.) Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

84 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Your Sponsor wants you to buy an item from a specific vendor because he has a friend who works there. However, this vendor is more expensive than alternative ones, and this vendor makes it more difficult to get the item specifications you need. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

85 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Your Sponsor wants you to buy an item from a specific vendor because he has a friend who works there. However, this vendor is more expensive than alternative ones, and this vendor makes it more difficult to get the item specifications you need. What do you do? The codes of ethics for engineering compel you to avoid conflicts of interest. In this case, your Sponsor being friends with the vendor is a conflict of interest. Instead, you should choose a vendor that is the best deal—the one with the lowest cost possible for the quality you need. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

86 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You’re visiting your sponsor for the first time and are eager to make a good first impression. When your sponsor approaches you, he/she says, “Wow, you are the hottest [PROGRAM] student I’ve ever seen.” You’re surprised at this greeting and feel very uncomfortable, but you’re afraid of offending your sponsor. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

87 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You’re visiting your sponsor for the first time and are eager to make a good first impression. When your sponsor approaches you, he/she says, “Wow, you are the hottest [PROGRAM] student I’ve ever seen.” You’re surprised at this greeting and feel very uncomfortable, but you’re afraid of offending your sponsor. What do you do?  Obviously, this is an inappropriate and unacceptable comment.  Say something like, “That’s not something I’m comfortable with. Thank you, but please keep this on a professional level.”  Then please notify an [PROGRAM] staff member of the incident. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

88 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You notice a change in behavior in one of your teammates lately. They haven’t been getting along well with the team, and they’re constantly showing aggressive/irritable behavior (slamming things, refusing to talk to people, etc.) They won’t tell anyone what’s going on. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

89 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You notice a change in behavior in one of your teammate’s lately. They haven’t been getting along well with the team, and they’re constantly showing aggressive/irritable behavior (slamming things, refusing to talk to people, etc.) They won’t tell anyone what’s going on. What do you do?  Talk to your Coach and/or the Director, and let them know what’s been happening with the team member. Let the Coach and Director handle the situation.  Don’t ignore the problem, even if you aren’t sure what to do to help, someone else might. There may be something deeper and more serious going on in your teammate’s life. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

90 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  Two team members are upset with each other about the deliverable for their project. They’re raising their voices, and the next thing you know, they’re throwing objects and yelling things that may instigate a fight. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

91 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  Two team members are upset with each other about the deliverable for their project. They’re raising their voices, and the next thing you know, they’re throwing objects and yelling things that may instigate a fight. What do you do?  Please find an [PROGRAM] staff member immediately and let them know what’s happening.  If it’s bad enough, exit the lab for your own safety and call University Police [UNIVERSITY POLICE PHONE #]  If it’s really bad, call 911.  If you feel uncomfortable calling either place, call the Director’s cell phone. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

92 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You and your team are in the [PROGRAM] lab on a conference call with your sponsor. While discussing how to delegate tasks, your sponsor says you should let the girl in the group do all the secretarial work. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

93 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You and your team are in the [PROGRAM] lab on a conference call with your sponsor. While discussing how to delegate tasks, your sponsor says you should let the girl in the group do all the secretarial work. What do you do?  Tell them that’s an inappropriate request.  The above comment is just an example of the various inappropriate comments like this that, unfortunately, still exist in the real world. Be prepared to respond to them with poise and professionalism. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

94 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  You and your team are having a meeting, when a teammate’s cell phone goes off. Your teammate answers it and starts having a conversation with a family member while you and your team are trying to discuss your project. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

95 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014  You and your team are having a meeting, when a teammate’s cell phones goes off. Your teammate answers it and starts having a conversation with a family member while you and your team are trying to discuss your project. What do you do?  If you feel comfortable enough, simply ask that person to take the call another time. If you don’t really know the person, you can ask an [PROGRAM] staff member or your coach to deal with the problem.  No cell phones during meetings. Don’t text on your cell while someone’s trying to talk to you. Don’t answer a call in the middle of the lab. Again, everyone can hear you.  Don’t talk about personal issues on your cell phone in the classroom lab. This isn’t the place to do that.  If you are distracting someone, be aware you are taking away valuable time for that person to be productive. Would you want someone to do that to you? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

96 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ After a meeting in the classroom lab, you realize you had promised your mom you’d give her a call this morning, but you forgot your cell phone at your apartment. There is an [PROGRAM] lab phone on the desk nearby. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

97 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ After a meeting in the classroom lab, you realize you had promised your mom you’d give her a call this morning, but you forgot your cell phone at your apartment. There is an [PROGRAM] lab phone on the desk nearby. What do you do?  It would be considered an unprofessional move to use the phones for personal, non-emergency phone calls. The phones are there for you to call team members running late, sponsors, coaches, and vendors. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

98 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Your sponsor calls and emails to check in on your team more frequently than other teams’ sponsors do. You’re having a very busy week and your sponsor has emailed and called you, but you don’t feel like it’s fair. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

99 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Your sponsor calls to check in on your team more frequently than other teams’ sponsors do. You’re having a rough week and your sponsor has emailed and called you, but you don’t feel like it’s fair. What do you do? Many professional engineering codes of ethics instruct you to always be professional with your client. Your sponsor IS your client. Sometimes they will contact you more often, or have a hand in the project more, than another team’s sponsor. That’s not out of line— that’s just their style. You need to maintain contact with them be professional toward them at all times. Treat them as you would treat a client in the real world. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

100 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You see a soldering iron is plugged in and left with equipment in the classroom lab. Neither you nor anyone on your team left it there. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

101 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You see a soldering iron is plugged in and left with equipment in the classroom lab. Neither you nor anyone on your team left it there. What do you do?  In this case, you should notify an [PROGRAM] staff member.  If there isn’t any [PROGRAM] staff around, please safely unplug the soldering iron and send an [PROGRAM] staff member an email notifying them of the incident.  Remember the [UNIVERSITY] Safety Rules and the Environmental Health & Safety Rules Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

102 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ During a team meeting in the classroom lab, your teammate Carla tries to fix a paper jam by pulling the jammed paper out of the printer. By doing this, she accidentally breaks part of the printer, and it won’t work. You see her walk away from it and leave class without telling anybody what happened. You’re running late for your next class. You weren’t the one who broke the printer, and you think an [PROGRAM] staff member will probably find it and fix it anyway. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

103 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ During a team meeting in the classroom lab, your teammate Carla tries to fix a paper jam by pulling the jammed paper out of the printer. By doing this, she accidentally breaks part of the printer, and it won’t work. You see her walk away from it and leave class without telling anybody what happened. You’re running late for your next class. You weren’t the one who broke the printer, and you think an [PROGRAM] staff member will probably find it and fix it anyway. What do you do?  Please, tell an [PROGRAM] staff member any time something is broken--even if you are not the one who broke it. It is as simple as sending an email to one of the [PROGRAM] staff members. Do not assume an [PROGRAM] staff member will find the broken item and fix it. You need to notify someone. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

104 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ Gerald walks into the lab wearing flip-flops and approaches a teammate who is soldering. The teammate turns to say hello and drips hot metal from the soldering iron onto Gerald’s toes. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

105 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ Gerald walks into the lab wearing flip-flops and approaches a teammate who is soldering. The teammate turns to say hello and drips hot metal from the soldering iron onto Gerald’s toes. What do you do?  Call the Director and then 911.  Have the [PROGRAM] staff come in and help.  The above situation is just one of the reasons open- toed shoes are not allowed in the lab. It is for everyone’s safety.  If you see someone wearing open-toed shoes in the lab, remind them it’s not safe to wear that in the lab, and it’s against the rules. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

106 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You’re walking with a friend who is not an [PROGRAM] student, and you remember you need to pick up an item from your team’s locker in the [PROGRAM] lab. It’ll only take a minute, and there’s no one else in the lab. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

107 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You’re walking with a friend who is not an [PROGRAM] student, and you remember you need to pick up an item from your team’s locker in the [PROGRAM] lab. It’ll only take a minute, and there’s no one else in the lab. What do you do?  Do not invite your friend inside the [PROGRAM] lab, even if it’s only for a few minutes. Anyone not on the approved list is never allowed inside the [PROGRAM] lab.  In the [UNIVERSITY] Non-Disclosure paperwork, allowing someone to be privy to information in the lab is breaking the non-disclosure agreement.  Remember, some sponsors have additional non- disclosure agreements. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

108 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You email the Program Assistant with a purchase request, but a few days later, you get an email from an [PROGRAM] staff member saying a “Project Stop” has been placed on the item because it was either ITAR or EAR. You are told you must stop all project work until given the green light. Your teammates, however, are worried because of all the project deadlines, and they do not want to fall behind. Some of your teammates suggest you go ahead and secretly work on some things for the project. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

109 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 ◦ You email the Program Assistant with a purchase request, but a few days later, you get an email from an [PROGRAM] staff member saying a “Project Stop” has been placed on the item because it was either ITAR or EAR. You are told you must stop all project work until given the green light. Your teammates, however, are worried because of all the project deadlines, and they do not want to fall behind. Some of your teammates suggest you go ahead and secretly work on some things for the project. What do you do?  Do not work on the project. It doesn’t matter what anyone else tells you, according to federal law, you must stop all project work until given the green light by the [UNIVERSITY] Contracts & Grants office. To do otherwise would be a violation of federal law.  This is the reason it is important to look for alternative purchases before requesting items to remove any issues of ITAR or EAR. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

110 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Your sponsor company is Lookie Cookies, Inc. and your team project is to design the most cost-efficient packaging that will minimize the amount of breakage and maximize the amount of freshness of their cookies. Your team has found the least expensive way to do this, but the adhesive you plan to use to seal the packaging contains an additive called Toluene, which you’ve heard causes harm to the environment. Your team hasn’t considered how the packaging may potentially hurt the environment or your customers. However, your sponsor seems pleased with the design, and you’ve met all your deadlines. What do you do? Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

111 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 Your sponsor company is Lookie Cookies, Inc. and your team project is to design the most cost-efficient packaging that will minimize the amount of breakage and maximize the amount of freshness of their cookies. Your team has found the least expensive way to do this, but the adhesive you plan to use to seal the packaging contains an additive called Toluene, which you’ve heard causes harm to the environment. Your team hasn’t considered how the packaging may potentially hurt the environment or your customers. However, your sponsor seems pleased with the design, and you’ve met all your deadlines. What do you do? Many professional engineering codes of ethics compel you to make sure what you build is safe for those who use it. Safety of the product is of utmost importance. When you’re designing anything, you must consider if it could potentially do harm to the user or to the environment. Additionally, you must consider intellectual property and the safety of the product. Section 17: Case Studies Back to Case Studies TOC

112 *Adapted from the University of Florida IPPD program Professional Manual © 2014 1. [PROGRAM PORTAL] [PROGRAM PORTAL] 2. Engineering Notebooks Engineering Notebooks 3. Intellectual property Intellectual property 4. ITAR/EAR ITAR/EAR 5. In Class In Class 6. [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] [LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM] 7. Trac Wiki Trac Wiki 8. SVN SVN 9. Classroom lab & rules Classroom lab & rules 10. Inventory Use Policy Inventory Use Policy 11. Making meetings work Making meetings work 12. Sexual harassment Sexual harassment 13. At-risk At-risk 14. Material & Supplies Request Material & Supplies Request 15. Travel requests Travel requests 16. Professionalism and Termination Committees Professionalism and Termination Committees 17. Case Studies Case Studies Sections: Integrated Product and Process Design


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