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G. HERBST 2012 Grammar Crammers 41-50. In, Into In  Indicates location  Ex: He was in the room. Into  Indicates motion  Ex: She walked into the room.

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Presentation on theme: "G. HERBST 2012 Grammar Crammers 41-50. In, Into In  Indicates location  Ex: He was in the room. Into  Indicates motion  Ex: She walked into the room."— Presentation transcript:

1 G. HERBST 2012 Grammar Crammers 41-50

2 In, Into In  Indicates location  Ex: He was in the room. Into  Indicates motion  Ex: She walked into the room.

3 Bring/Take Bring  Come to a place with someone or something  Ex: Make sure you bring that delicious cake when you swing by the birthday party. Take  To lay hold of something with one’s hands; to remove  Ex: Did you take a piece of her cake?

4 Contagious, Infectious Contagious  Of a disease: spread from one person or organism to another by direct or indirect contact  Ex: Many incurable diseases are highly contagious.  Of an emotion: likely to spread to and affect others  Ex: Her enthusiasm is contagious. Infectious  Of a disease: likely to be transmitted to people or organisms through the environment  Ex: Horses are more likely to become infected with --- when there are puddles of stagnant water and many mosquitos.  Of an emotion: like to spread or influence others in a rapid manner  Ex: His excitement infected the crowd with positive energy.

5 Amid, Among, Between Amid  Never amidst  Surrounded by; in the middle of  Ex: Our dream home was set amid magnificent rolling countryside. Among  Never amongst  Introduces more than two items  Ex: The funds were divided among Ford, Carter and McCarthy. Between  Introduces two items  Ex: The two siblings split the cake between themselves.  Ex: They kept the secret between him and her.

6 Ain’t This not a “real” word, but one that is simply colloquial in nature  Often used as a substitute for to be+not  Ex: INCORRECT: She ain’t going to go to the party. CORRECT: She isn’t going to go to the party. Do not use this word, ever, in any formal writing

7 Awful To be used only as an adjective Meaning very bad or unpleasant  Ex: Sulfur has an awful smell.  Ex: He made an awful speech. Do not use in colloquial phrases such as: You’ve got an awful lot to learn.  Instead, state: You still have much to learn.

8 Accept, Except Accept: to receive  Examples:  She was happy to accept the nomination as prom queen.  He accepted the gift from his friend. Except: to exclude  Examples:  I enjoy all vegetables except eggplant.  Everyone was invited to attend the conference except the students who were receiving an F in the class.

9 May, Might Difference is subtle  Both indicate that something is possible, but something that may happen is more likely than something that might happen Might  The likelihood of occurrence is a mighty stretch  Imagine something you'd almost never do, and then imagine someone inviting you to do it  Exceptions:  Might is the past tense of may  When you're talking about something not happening, it can be better to use might because people could think you’re talking about permission if you use may May  Use when the outcome is likely Examples:  You might clean your room, but you may call your friend later.  You might climb Mt. Everest someday, but you may go hiking in the foothills next weekend.

10 Could care less Proper phrase is “couldn’t care less”  HOWEVER “could care less” is overtaking “couldn’t care less” Meant to be used with an ironic or sarcastic tone

11 So, Very So  Intensifier  Should generally be avoided when using by itself  May be used with the word “that”  Examples:  Incorrect: I was so happy.  Correct: I was so happy that I jumped for joy. Very  Intensified  May be used by itself for emphasis  Use sparingly  Opt for more specific nouns, adjectives or phrases  Example: Instead of saying, “I was very hungry,” replace with “I was famished.”


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