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Defending the Nation “Put out that light!” Part II Press ‘ESC’ at any time to stop the presentation By Martin Williams.

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Presentation on theme: "Defending the Nation “Put out that light!” Part II Press ‘ESC’ at any time to stop the presentation By Martin Williams."— Presentation transcript:

1 Defending the Nation “Put out that light!” Part II Press ‘ESC’ at any time to stop the presentation By Martin Williams

2 To-Night’s Black-Out Times London: 7.56 p.m. to 6.12 a.m. Cardiff: 8.09 p.m. to 6.25 a.m. Swansea: 8.12 p.m. to 6.28 a.m. Haverfordwest: 8.16 p.m. to 6.32 a.m. Summer Time. Sun rises (London), 6.44 a.m.; sets 7.26 p.m. Moon rises, 1.27 a.m.; sets a.m. What is meant by a Black-Out?

3 During which season did this notice appear? What is meant by a Black-Out? To-Night’s Black-Out Times London: 7.56 p.m. to 6.12 a.m. Cardiff: 8.09 p.m. to 6.25 a.m. Swansea: 8.12 p.m. to 6.28 a.m. Haverfordwest: 8.16 p.m. to 6.32 a.m. Summer Time. Sun rises (London), 6.44 a.m.; sets 7.26 p.m. Moon rises, 1.27 a.m.; sets a.m.

4 “My dad was an ARP Warden in Pembroke Dock. We thought we were special when a sign was screwed to our door. It showed people where to go for help. All windows had to be taped up and black curtains put up at night as no light was to shine out of the windows to guide the enemy.” Jean Williams, schoolgirl in Pembroke Dock during World War Two Images courtesy of Swansea Heritage Net Discuss: how important a job do you think being an A.R.P Warden was?

5 “Well, you didn’t dare switch a light on until you’d actually shut the door, till you’d checked that all your curtains were closed, were shut right across, and your windows black. Otherwise you’d get a fierce shout from outside – ‘Put out that light!’ Estelle Clarke (young wife from Swansea), quoted in Wales at War by Phil Carradice (Gomer Press, 2003) “My father was an Air Raid Warden. As the war developed so all the younger men in the road had been called up. And he was about the youngest still there so he was the Air Raid Warden. Whenever there was a raid or when the air raid warning went he had to go outside straight away and walk the length of the road around it to make sure there were no lights showing – and that everyone was inside.” Dilys Owen, young lady living in South Wales during World War Two quoted in Wales at War by Phil Carradice (Gomer Press, 2003 ) According to these sources what was one the main jobs done by an Air Raid Warden?

6 In the County of Glamorgan Petty Sessional Division of Miskin Higher To __________________ of Aberdare You were (on the 10 th day of September 1941) convicted by the Court of Summery Jurisdiction sitting in Aberdare. Of Displaying a light from inside a roofed building. And were ordered to pay the sum of one pound. This is taken from an original document. How does this document further emphasise the importance placed upon Black-Outs ?

7 Image reproduced with the kind permission of Swansea Heritage Net What do you think these objects are? What would they have been used for?

8 What problems do you think people faced because of Black-Outs?

9 Gomer Press have kindly agreed to allow NGfL Cymru to use part of Chris Stevens’ text ‘A Wartime Scrapbook’. The following files are taken from the CD Rom that accompanies the text. Click on the links for the relevant PDF Activity Files. Blackout Facts Exercise

10 “Early raiders had dropped flares to seaward of the town, and then the shower of incendiaries (something that causes fires) was the prelude to several hours of attack. Men, women and even children tackled these incendiaries, and prevented many fires. Some, alas, paid for their pluck and heroism with their lives, like the two A.R.P. messenger boys who were dealing with incendiaries when a big bomb fell nearby and buried them in debris, from which they never emerged alive. Wave after wave of bombers dropped their loads, and to civil defence workers and firewatchers alike time lost its meaning.” An “Evening Post” Reporter ( ), quoted in ‘All that was left was the coalshed…’ (Swansea Museum Services, 1997) How dangerous a job could being an Air Raid Warden be? Photograph used with the kind permission of Phil Carradice

11 Air Raid Wardens END To-Night’s Black-Out Times London: 7.56 p.m. to 6.12 a.m. Cardiff: 8.09 p.m. to 6.25 a.m. Swansea: 8.12 p.m. to 6.28 a.m. Haverfordwest: 8.16 p.m. to 6.32 a.m. Summer Time. Sun rises (London), 6.44 a.m.; sets 7.26 p.m. Moon rises, 1.27 a.m.; sets a.m.


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